Harbor Hills, New York

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Harbor Hills, New York
A welcome sign at an entrance to Harbor Hills on June 11, 2021.
A welcome sign at an entrance to Harbor Hills on June 11, 2021.
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York.
Location in Nassau County and the state of New York.
Harbor Hills, New York is located in New York
Harbor Hills, New York
Harbor Hills, New York
Location within the state of New York
Coordinates: 40°47′19″N 73°44′56″W / 40.78861°N 73.74889°W / 40.78861; -73.74889Coordinates: 40°47′19″N 73°44′56″W / 40.78861°N 73.74889°W / 40.78861; -73.74889
Country United States
State New York
County Nassau County, New York
TownNorth Hempstead
Area
 • Total0.2 sq mi (0.5 km2)
 • Land0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation
72 ft (22 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total575
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
11023
Area code(s)516
FIPS code36-32094
GNIS feature ID0952189

Harbor Hills is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) located on the Great Neck Peninsula within the Town of North Hempstead in Nassau County, on the North Shore of Long Island, in New York, United States. The population was 575 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

In 1956, the Town of North Hempstead approved the construction of the community's swimming pool and its bathhouses, and approved of the creation of the Harbor Hills Park District, which was created specifically for the community's new park complex project.[1] The contract was awarded to Great Neck-based Schumacher & Forelle, which bid $169,500 (1956 USD) for the pool's construction, and promised to do the work in 110 days. The project was paid for by the hamlet's roughly 175 residents.[1]

The community's pool would be reconstructed between 1986 and 1989, and again was paid for by the hamlet's residents.[2] This controversial project led to a lawsuit filed by residents over the payments and unexpected rises in taxes, which the Harbor Hills Civic Association charged were due to North Hempstead overpaying, expanding the project, and failing to properly communicate with or notify the locals.[2][3][4]

Geography[edit]

U.S. Census map of Harbor Hills.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2), of which, 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (35.29%) is water.[5]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 563 people, 181 households, and 165 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 5,043.2 per square mile (1,976.1/km2). There were 186 housing units at an average density of 1,666.1/sq mi (652.9/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.27% White, 0.36% African American, 2.13% Asian, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.24% of the population.

There were 181 households, out of which 47.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 85.6% were married couples living together, 4.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 8.3% were non-families. 7.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.11 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the CDP, the population was spread out, with 32.1% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 29.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $153,181, and the median income for a family was $153,619. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $35,156 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $62,054. About 3.4% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Town representation[edit]

As Harbor Hills is an unincorporated hamlet, it has no government of its own, and is instead governed directly by the Town of North Hempstead in Manhasset.[7][8]

Harbor Hills is located in the Town of North Hempstead's 5th district, which as of September 2021 is represented on the Town Board by Lee R. Seeman (D–Great Neck).[8]

Representation in higher government[edit]

Nassau County representation[edit]

Harbor Hills is located in Nassau County's 10th Legislative district, which as of September 2021 is represented in the Nassau County Legislature by Ellen W. Birnbaum (D–Great Neck).[7][9]

New York State representation[edit]

New York State Assembly[edit]

Harbor Hills is located in the New York State Assembly's 16th Assembly district, which as of September 2021 is represented by Gina Sillitti (D–Manorhaven).[7][10]

New York State Senate[edit]

Harbor Hills is located in the New York State Senate's 7th State Senate district, which as of September 2021 is represented in the New York State Senate by Anna Kaplan (D–North Hills).[7][11]

Federal representation[edit]

United States Congress[edit]

Harbor Hills is located in New York's 3rd congressional district, which as of September 2021 is represented in the United States Congress by Tom Suozzi (D–Glen Cove).[7][12]

United States Senate[edit]

Like the rest of New York, Harbor Hills is represented in the United States Senate by Charles Schumer (D) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D).[13]

Politics[edit]

In the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the majority of Harbor Hills voters voted for Hillary Clinton (D).[14]

Education[edit]

School district[edit]

Harbor Hills is located entirely within the boundaries of the Great Neck Union Free School District.[7][15] As such, all children who reside within Harbor Hills and attend public schools go to Great Neck's schools.[7][15]

Library district[edit]

Harbor Hills is located within the boundaries of the Great Neck Library District.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Sign Harbor Hills Pool Contract". Newsday. April 25, 1956 – via ProQuest.
  2. ^ a b Marquard, Bryan K. (September 11, 1991). "Call for Legal Action in Pool Project: Zwirn seeks $122,817 from consulting firm". Newsday – via ProQuest.
  3. ^ Chicurel, Judy (April 7, 1991). "A private community in Great Neck to seek court action". The New York Times – via ProQuest.
  4. ^ Eisenberg, Carol (August 15, 1990). "Probe of $1.3M Pool Repair Urged: Town paid exorbitant fees, expanded project, civic leader charges". Newsday – via ProQuest.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h "Long Island Index: Interactive Map". www.longislandindexmaps.org. Retrieved 2021-08-05.
  8. ^ a b "Town of North Hempstead - Councilwoman Lee R. Seeman (5th District)". northhempsteadny.gov. Retrieved 2021-09-12.
  9. ^ "District 10 - Ellen W. Birnbaum | Nassau County, NY - Official Website". www.nassaucountyny.gov. Retrieved 2021-09-12.
  10. ^ "Gina L. Sillitti - Assembly District 16 |Assembly Member Directory | New York State Assembly". nyassembly.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  11. ^ "NY Senate District 7". NY State Senate. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  12. ^ "Suozzi Declares Victory In NY 3rd Congressional District Race". Huntington, NY Patch. 2020-11-17. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  13. ^ "U.S. Senate: Contacting U.S. Senators". www.senate.gov. Retrieved 2021-07-22.
  14. ^ Welch, Will (2017-11-08). "How Long Island Voted". Newsday. Retrieved 2021-06-23.
  15. ^ a b "Composite School District Boundaries Shapefiles". NCES. Retrieved 2020-10-23.