Hardboiled Rose

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hardboiled Rose
Directed by F. Harmon Weight
Written by Darryl F. Zanuck (story)
Robert Lord (screenplay)
Joseph Jackson (titles)
Starring Myrna Loy
William Collier, Jr.
John Miljan
Cinematography William Rees
Edited by William Holmes
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. (as Warner Brothers Production)
Release date
March 30, 1929
Country United States
Language English

Hardboiled Rose (1929) is a 62-minute part-talkie released by Warner Bros. and starring Myrna Loy, William Collier, Jr. and John Miljan.

Plot[edit]

A Southern belle (Loy) must work in a gambling house to pay off her father's debts, which drove him to suicide. She then meets a man who sweeps her off her feet and takes her away from it all.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

This was Loy's second starring role in a movie, after Turn Back the Hours (1928). Hardboiled Rose would become Myrna Loy's last part-talkie. After this movie Myrna Loy would make all-talking movies, with some filmed in Technicolor. Loy's early talkies in Technicolor were The Desert Song (1929, Warner Brothers' first movie released in color), The Show of Shows (1929) and Under a Texas Moon (1930, the second all color-all talking movie to be filmed outdoors).

In 1933, Loy's Warners contract ended and she signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. In 1934, Myrna Loy made two movies with MGM that would make her a big star for the next 20 years, Manhattan Melodrama and The Thin Man.

Sound[edit]

According to TV Guide.com's review of Hardboiled Rose, the talking sequences were added to the movie later in production. All studios were converting to sound, so major studio releases had to be at least a part-talkie.

Film preservation[edit]

The film elements for Hardboiled Rose still survive, but the soundtrack which was recorded on Vitaphone discs, is lost except the fourth reel disc.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]