Harold Palin

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Harold Palin
Personal information
Full name Harold Palin
Nickname Moggy
Born July→September 1916
Warrington, Lancashire, England
Died September 1990 (aged 73–74)
Warrington, Cheshire, England
Playing information
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 16 st 0 lb (102 kg)
Position Fullback, Loose forward
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
Feb 1936–≤40 Warrington
≤1940–47 Swinton
1947–Apr 51 Warrington 150 32 436 3 974
1951–52 Halifax
1952–53 Keighley 31 1 112 227
Total 181 33 548 3 1201
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1947–48 England 2 1 0 0 3
1947 Great Britain 2 2 0 0 6

Harold 'Moggy' Palin (July→September 1916[1] — September 1990 (aged 73–74)) born in Warrington, Lancashire, was an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s playing at representative level for Great Britain, and England, and at club level for Warrington (Captain) (twice), Swinton, Halifax and Keighley, as a Fullback, or Loose forward/Lock, i.e. number 1, or 13, during the era of contested scrums, he died in Warrington, Cheshire. Harold Palin's nickname of 'Moggy' was given to him as a child due to cat-like abilities, however he was not particularly fond of the nickname.

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Harold Palin won caps for England while at Warrington in 1947 against Wales, in 1948 against France,[2] and won caps for Great Britain while at Warrington in 1947 against New Zealand (2 matches).[3]

Championship Final appearances[edit]

Harold Palin was Captain, and played Loose forward/Lock in Warrington's 15-5 victory over Bradford Northern in the Championship Final during the 1947–48 season at Maine Road, Manchester.[4]

Challenge Cup Final appearances[edit]

Harold Palin played Loose forward/Lock, scored a drop goal, and 4-conversions in Warrington's 19-0 victory over Widnes in the 1950 Challenge Cup Final during the 1949–50 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 6 May 1950, in front of a crowd of 94,249.[5]

County Cup Final appearances[edit]

Harold Palin played Fullback in Swinton's 5-4 victory over Widnes in the 1940 Lancashire County Cup Final first-leg during the 1939–40 season at Naughton Park, Widnes on Saturday 20 April 1940, played Fullback in the 16-11 victory over Widnes in the 1940 Lancashire County Cup Final second-leg during the 1939–40 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 27 April 1940, played Loose forward/Lock, and scored a conversion in Warrington's 8-14 defeat by Wigan in the 1948 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1948–49 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 13 November 1948,[6] and played Loose forward/Lock, and scored a conversion in Warrington's 5-28 defeat by Wigan in the 1950 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1950–51 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 4 November 1950.[7]

Playing career[edit]

Harold Palin made his début for Keighley, played Fullback, and scored 4-conversions in the 17-11 victory over Castleford at Wheldon Road on Saturday 27 September 1952, by the end of 1952–53 season he had beaten Keighley's 46-year-old "most goals in a season" record that was previously set by Bob Walker during the 1906–07 season, after landing his 81st conversion in the last match of the season at York, Harold Palin was later sent off by the referee, he played eight matches during the 1953–54 season and following the arrival of Bert Cook from Leeds, Harold Palin retired from playing aged 37.[8]

Honoured at Warrington Wolves[edit]

Harold Palin is a Warrington Wolves Hall of Fame inductee.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  3. ^ "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  4. ^ "History of Warrington Rugby League Club". britishrugbyleague.blogspot.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "Wembley dream team". warringtonguardian.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  6. ^ "1948-1949 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "1950-1951 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "The Rock and Roll 50s". keighleyrugbyheritage.info. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  9. ^ "Hall of Fame at Wire2Wolves.com". wire2wolves.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 

External links[edit]