Harry Vallon

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Vallon circa 1915

Harry Vallon was a New York City gambler and mob informant. He turned state's evidence and testified against the gunman in the murder of Herman Rosenthal, and also against Charles Becker, under a promise of immunity from the district attorney.[1] He testified as one of four mob informants, along with Bridgey Webber, Jack Rose, and Sam Schepps at the Becker-Rosenthal trial.[2] Based upon his testimony, Charles Becker, along with the four gunmaen involved in the murder, were convicted and sentenced to death.[3] In 1936 he was threatened with rearrest in the case.[4]

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  1. ^ "People v. Becker". Northeastern Reporter. 1915. ... and Harry Vallon, who turned state's evidence and testified not only against the gunmen, but also against the defendant, Becker, under a promise of immunity from the district attorney, given with the sanction of the court. ... 
  2. ^ "Becker Informers Now Ready To Flit. Schepps West for Vaudeville, Webber to Europe, Rose and Vallon Won't Tell". New York Times. November 21, 1912. Retrieved 2010-12-10. Becker's Lawyer Serves Notice of Appeal. Sam Schepps, "Bridgey" Webber, Jack Rose, and Harry Vallon, whose stories convicted Charles Becker and the four ... 
  3. ^ "Harry Vallon Released. "Bridgie" Webber's Brother Stops Prosecution in Foreclosure Case". New York Times. December 7, 1913. Retrieved 2010-12-10. Harry Vallon, one of the informants against Lieut. Charles Becker, who was arrested at Monticello on Thursday on a charge of grand larceny in the first degree, was discharged here to-day by Justice Niven on account of the refusal of the complainant, Charles Webber, brother of "Bridgie" Webber, to prosecute. ... 
  4. ^ "Dodge Refuses to Grant Lawyer's Request in Rosenthal Case". New York Times. September 10, 1936. Retrieved 2010-12-13. District Attorney William C. Dodge notified Henry H. Klein, a lawyer, yesterday, that he would not cause the rearrest of two of the principal witnesses for the State in the slaying of Herman Rosenthal, the gambler, twenty-four years ago, unless Mr. Klein could furnish new evidence justifying such action. ... Jack Rose and Harry Vallon, who had received immunity for their testimony, be rearrested and the case against them resubmitted to the grand jury on a murder ...