Harvey Miguel Robinson

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Harvey Miguel Robinson
Born Harvey Miguel Robinson
(1974-12-06) December 6, 1974 (age 43)
Allentown, Pennsylvania
Criminal penalty Death
Criminal status On Death Row
Conviction(s) Murder
Details
Victims 3
Span of crimes
1992–1993
Country United States
Location(s) Pennsylvania
Weapons Stabbing
Date apprehended
December 6, 1993

Harvey Miguel Robinson (born December 6, 1974) is an American serial killer currently imprisoned on death row in Pennsylvania. He is one of the youngest serial killers in American history. He was 18 years old when he was apprehended for his crimes. He is also the first serial killer in the history of Allentown, Pennsylvania.[1]

Background[edit]

Robinson's father was an alcoholic who physically and emotionally abused Robinson's mother. The father eventually left the family. His father was later incarcerated for beating his girlfriend to death.

Before the murders, Robinson had frequently stolen female underwear.

Crimes[edit]

The rape/murder victims were:[2]

  • Joan Burghardt, a 29-year-old nurse's aide (August 1992)
  • Charlotte Schmoyer, a 15-year-old newspaper carrier for The Morning Call (June 1993)[3] - Schmoyer was a student at Louis E. Dieruff High School.[4]
  • Jessica Jean Fortney, a 47-year-old grandmother (July 1993)

Between the murders of Burghardt and Schmoyer, Robinson was arrested for burglary and served eight months in prison. After the murder of Schmoyer, he almost got apprehended when he was pulled over for a speeding violation. But Robinson received his speeding ticket and left.

Capture[edit]

Denise Sam-Cali was one of two of Robinson's victims who survived. The other was a five-year-old girl Robinson stalked for days; Robinson then broke in to her home and raped and choked her, then left her for dead. Sam-Cali managed to break free of Robinson's grip and run outside. Robinson attempted to attack her again, but fled. Eventually, the police used Sam-Cali as bait to lure Robinson in to capture him. A shootout erupted between Robinson and a police officer. Robinson fled, but he was wounded. He went to the hospital, where he was arrested.

Aftermath[edit]

Robinson was sentenced to death for his crimes. As of April 2006, his execution had been stayed. He was later resentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of Joan Burghardt because he was 17 when the crime was committed.[5] As of 2010 Robinson was to face another jury to decide the penalty for Charlotte Schmoyer.[2] On December 14, 2012, Robinson agreed to waive his appeal rights in the Schmoyer case in exchange for a life sentence.[6] In December 2013, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court upheld Robinson's death penalty in the Fortney murder.[7]

In the media[edit]

The story of Robinson's crime spree was depicted in the 1996 film titled No One Could Protect Her, with Joanna Kerns playing the part of surviving victim Denise Sam-Cali.[8]

Part of the story of Robinson's crime spree had also been told in the Investigation Discovery show Your Worst Nightmare.[1]

He was also depicted on A&E Killer Kids Show.

He was also depicted on ID Most Evil Show, in 3° Season Chapter 6 "Fantasy Killers".

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sheehan, Daniel Patrick (15 February 2006). "Victim, kin of dead keep killer in past". The Morning Call(Allentown, Pennsylvania). 
  2. ^ a b Warner, Frank (6 April 2010). "Convicted killer granted delay in retrial". The Morning Call(Allentown, Pennsylvania). 
  3. ^ Snyder, Susan (1993-06-11). "Call Carrier's Death Affects Many Students". The Daily Call. Retrieved 2017-08-11. 
  4. ^ Casler, Kristin (1993-06-11). "`It's The Worst Nightmare I Could Imagine' Parents Struggle To Cope With Loss Of Daughter". The Daily Call. Retrieved 2017-08-11. 
  5. ^ Garlicki, Debbie (26 April 2006). "Robinson resentenced for murder". The Morning Call(Allentown, Pennsylvania). 
  6. ^ McEvoy, Colin (December 14, 2012). "Allentown serial killer spared death penalty after waiving appeal rights". The Express-Times. Easton, Pennsylvania: Advance Publications. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  7. ^ McEvoy, Colin (December 31, 2013). "Allentown serial killer's death penalty verdict upheld". The Express-Times. Easton, Pennsylvania: Advance Publications. Retrieved May 15, 2016. 
  8. ^ Internet Movie Database listing for No One Could Protect Her

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]