Haynes International

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Haynes International
Public company
Traded as NASDAQHAYN
S&P 600 SmallCap Index
Founded 1912
Founder Elwood Haynes
Headquarters Kokomo, Indiana
Key people
Mark Comerford, President & CEO[1]
Products Corrosion-Resistant Alloys
High-Temperature Alloys
Revenue IncreaseUS$579.56 million (FY 2012)[2]
IncreaseUS$50.15 million (FY 2012)[2]
Total assets IncreaseUS$626.93 million(FY 2012)[2]
Total equity IncreaseUS$301.10 million(FY 2012)[2]
Number of employees
1,072 (2006)
Website www.haynesintl.com

Haynes International Inc. is a manufacturer of metal alloys employing more than 1,070 employees worldwide with sales of $434.4 million in 2007 with eight plants around the world. The corporation is headquartered in Kokomo, Indiana. The company specializes in corrosion resistant, and high-temperature alloys for the aerospace, chemical, and gas turbine industries.[3]

History[edit]

The company was founded in 1912 as Haynes Stellite Works by Elwood Haynes in Kokomo, Indiana. In the late 1880s Haynes started experimenting with various alloys to create a metal that would resist corrosion. After creating new alloys from nickel and chromium he had them patented and started building a foundry in 1912.[4] In 1920 the company was sold to Union Carbide. Haynes is now a publicly traded company.[5]

Hastelloy[edit]

Three check valves in corrosion-resistant Hastelloy

Hastelloy is a registered trademark name of Haynes International, Inc. The trademark is applied as the prefix name of a range of 22 different highly corrosion-resistant metal alloys, loosely grouped by the metallurgical industry under the material term “superalloys” or “high-performance alloys”.

The predominant alloying ingredient is typically the transition metal nickel. Other alloying ingredients are added to nickel in each of the subcategories of this trademark designation and include varying percentages of the elements molybdenum, chromium, cobalt, iron, copper, manganese, titanium, zirconium, aluminum, carbon, and tungsten.

The primary function of the Hastelloy super alloys is that of effective survival under high-temperature, high-stress service in a moderately to severely corrosive, and/or erosion-prone environment where iron-based alloys would fail, including the pressure vessels of some nuclear reactors, chemical reactors, distillation equipment, and pipes and valves in chemical industry. Although a super alloy, Hastelloy experiences degradation due to fabricating and handling. Electropolishing or passivation of Hastelloy can improve corrosion resistance.[6]

The following Hastelloy alloys have been produced; however, production of some may have been discontinued:

Composition of various hastelloy alloys (percent)
Alloy Co Cr Mo W Fe Si Mn C Ni Others
B-2 1* 1* 28  – 2* 0.1* 1* 0.01* Balance  –
B-3 3* 1.5 28.5 3* 1.5 0.1* 3* 0.01* 65 min. Al-0.5*, Ti-0.2*
C-4 2* 16 16  – 3* 0.08* 1* 0.01* Balance Ti-0.7*
C-2000 2* 23 16  – 3* 0.08*  – 0.01* Balance Cu-1.6
C-22 2.5* 22 13 3 3 0.08* 0.5* 0.01* Balance V-0.35*
C-276 2.5* 16 16 4 5 0.08* 1* 0.01* Balance V-0.35*
G-30 2* 30 5.5 2.5 15 1* 1.5* 0.03* Balance Nb-0.8*, Cu-2*
N 0.2* 7 16 0.5* 5* 1* 0.8* 0.08* Balance Al+Ti-0.5*, Cu-0.35*
W 2.5* 5 24  – 6 1* 1* 0.12* Balance V-0.6*
X 1.5* 22* 9* 0.6* 18.5* 0.5* 0.5* 0.1* Balance  –
  • 1 The undiluted deposited chemical composition of covered electrodes of some of these alloys may vary beyond the limits shown.[7]
  • *Maximum

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Directors and Executive Officers". Haynes International, Inc. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Haynes International, Inc (HAYN)-Key Statistics". Yahoo! Finance. 
  3. ^ "Haynes International Company Information". hoovers.com. Retrieved 21 June 2016. 
  4. ^ "Elwood Haynes". infoplease.com. 
  5. ^ "EDGAR Search Results-Haynes International Inc". Exchange Securities Commission. 
  6. ^ Hastelloy Electropolishing and Passivation .
  7. ^ "Fabrication of Hastelloy Corrosion Resistant Alloys". haynesintl.com. Retrieved 21 June 2016. 

External links[edit]