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Hatari (band)

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Hatari
Iceland-Hatari-ESC2019-002.jpg
Hatari performing at the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 in Tel Aviv, Israel
Background information
OriginReykjavík, Iceland
Genres
Years active2015 (2015)–present (present)
LabelsSvikamylla ehf.
Websitehatari.is
Members
  • Klemens Nikulásson Hannigan
  • Matthías Tryggvi Haraldsson
  • Einar Hrafn Stefánsson

Hatari (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈhaːtarɪ]; transl. "Hater")[1][2] are an Icelandic techno, industrial and punk rock band from Reykjavík.[3][4] The band consists of Klemens Nikulásson Hannigan, Matthías Tryggvi Haraldsson and Einar Hrafn Stefánsson, and has released one extended play as well as four singles. Hatari represented Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 with their song "Hatrið mun sigra", finishing 10th in the final.

History

Hatari was formed in 2015 by Klemens Nikulásson Hannigan and Matthías Tryggvi Haraldsson, and was later joined by Einar Hrafn Stefánsson.[3][5] Throughout 2016, they performed five times, including appearances in Reykjavík, at Eistnaflug, at LungA Festival, and at Norðanpaunk, prior to their break-out performances at Iceland Airwaves, held at Kex Hostel in Reykjavík, on 31 October and 6 November 2016.[5][6] Hatari's debut extended play (EP), named Neysluvara, was released through Svikamylla ehf. via Spotify and Bandcamp on 31 October 2017.[7] Leading up to the EP's release, the band also released music videos for two songs from the EP, "Ódýr" and "X".[7][8]

On 21 December 2018, Hatari announced that the board of directors of Svikamylla ehf. had passed a resolution to dissolve the band.[9] However, Hatari was already shortlisted to appear at Eurosonic Noorderslag, a music event held in the Netherlands.[10] Simultaneous to the dissolution announcement, Hatari released the music video for a new single, "Spillingardans".[9] In January 2019, Hatari was confirmed as one of the ten acts competing in Söngvakeppnin 2019, Iceland's national selection for its entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, with their new song "Hatrið mun sigra".[11] Hatari won Söngvakeppnin 2019 in March that year, and thus represented Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest in May.[3] In the lead-up to the competition, Hatari made headlines with a number of political statements over the Israeli occupation of Palestine and other antics, resulting in Jon Ola Sand, the executive supervisor of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), warning them that they had reached the limit of the EBU's patience, and would be disqualified should they choose to bring its political statements to the stage.[12] However, when Iceland's televote score was announced at the end of the final, members of Hatari held up banners displaying the flag of Palestine.[13] At the same time, Hatari's Instagram account posted images of the flag.[13] In response, the EBU issued a statement following the event, saying that the Eurovision Song Contest reference group would discuss any consequences.[13] Overall, Hatari received 234 points in the final, finishing 10th.[14] They followed the contest by announcing a collaboration with Palestinian singer Bashar Murad for their next single.[15][better source needed]

Members

Hatari consists of cousins and vocalists Klemens Nikulásson Hannigan and Matthías Tryggvi Haraldsson (both aged 25–26),[16] and producer and drummer Einar Hrafn Stefánsson.[3][2] Klemens is the son of Nikulás Hannigan, the head of the trade office division at Iceland's Ministry for Foreign Affairs, and Rán Tryggvadóttir, a lawyer for legal firm LMB Mandat.[17] Matthías is the son of Haraldur Flosi Tryggvason, the owner of LMB Mandat and brother of Rán, and Gunnhildur Sigrúnar Hauks, an artist.[17] Einar is the son of Stefán Haukur Jóhannesson, the Icelandic ambassador stationed in London.[17] Contributors to Hatari include choreographers Sólbjört Sigurðardóttir, Sigurður Andrean Sigurgeirsson and Ástrós Guðjónsdóttir.[2][18]

Discography

Extended plays

Title Details
Neysluvara
  • Released: 31 October 2017
  • Label: Svikamylla ehf.
  • Format: Digital download

Singles

Title Year Peak chart position Album
ICE
"Ódýr" 2017 Neysluvara
"X"
"Spillingardans" 2018 Non-album singles
"Hatrið mun sigra" 2019 1[citation needed]
"—" denotes a release that did not chart or was not released in that territory.

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Recipient Result Ref.
2017 Grapevine Music Awards Best Live Performance Hatari Won [19]
2018 Grapevine Music Awards Best Live Performance Hatari Won [20]
Icelandic Music Awards Song of the Year – Rock "Spillingardans" Nominated [21][22]
Performer of the Year Hatari Won

References

  1. ^ "Bondage clad underground techno band becomes Iceland's Eurovision entry". Iceland Monitor. 3 March 2019. Archived from the original on 4 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Holley, Rob (12 March 2019). "Hatari interview: 'We're the pink elephant in the room'". The Independent. Archived from the original on 15 March 2019. Retrieved 12 March 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d Rasmus (2 March 2019). "Iceland: Hatari wins Söngvakeppnin 2019 with "Hatrið mun sigra"". Eurovisionworld. Archived from the original on 6 March 2019. Retrieved 4 March 2019.
  4. ^ Bjornsson, Anna Margret (24 March 2019). "Eurovision: Iceland embraces Hatari's bleak message for Israel contest". BBC News.
  5. ^ a b Stína (4 December 2016). "5 reasons why Hatari won Iceland Airwaves". Reykjavík on Stage. Archived from the original on 12 February 2019. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  6. ^ Cohen, Hannah Jane; Daly, Ciarán (8 January 2017). "Best Live Band: Hatari". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 30 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  7. ^ a b Friðriksson, Gauti (7 August 2018). "Artist Spotlight: Hatari". Guide to Iceland Now. Archived from the original on 30 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  8. ^ Fontaine, Paul (27 October 2017). "Iceland's Most Compelling Band Releases New Video". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 30 March 2019. Retrieved 11 March 2019.
  9. ^ a b Rogers, John (21 December 2018). "Bondage-Synth-Punk Trio Hatari Announce Final Gig After Failing To Dismantle Capitalism". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 12 February 2019. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  10. ^ Rogers, John (13 March 2019). "Six Times Icelandic Eurovision Stars Hatari Trolled The World". The Reykjavik Grapevine.
  11. ^ Kristiansen, Wivian Renee (27 January 2019). "Who are the Söngvakeppnin 2019 artists?". ESCXtra.
  12. ^ Fontaine, Andie (16 May 2019). "Hatari Have "Reached The Limits" Of EBU's Patience Over Repeated Political Statements". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 17 May 2019. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  13. ^ a b c Rogers, John (19 May 2019). "Hatari And Madonna Show Palestinian Flags At Eurovision In Tel Aviv". The Reykjavík Grapevine.
  14. ^ Rasmus (19 May 2019). "Duncan Laurence from Netherlands wins Eurovision Song Contest 2019". Eurovisionworld.
  15. ^ Kelly, Emma (20 May 2019). "Iceland's Hatari confirm collaboration with queer Palestinian artist after Eurovision protest". Metro.
  16. ^ Holmes, Oliver (13 May 2019). "'Hate will prevail': Icelandic BDSM band put Eurovision and Israel in a bind". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 16 May 2019. Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  17. ^ a b c "Hatari's drummer is the son of Iceland's ambassador to the UK". Iceland Monitor. 6 March 2019.
  18. ^ Erlingsdóttir, Margrét Helga (9 March 2019). ""Hreyfingar geta sagt svo miklu meira en orð"" ["Movements can say so much more than words"]. Vísir (in Icelandic). Archived from the original on 6 March 2019. Retrieved 13 March 2019.
  19. ^ Yamasaki, Parker (8 January 2017). "It's The Winners Of The Fifth Annual Grapevine Music Awards!". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 12 February 2019. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  20. ^ Rogers, John (4 January 2018). "Grapevine Music Awards: Best Live Band – Hatari". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 12 February 2019. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  21. ^ Fontaine, Andie (21 February 2019). "The Nominees For The Icelandic Music Awards Are Here". The Reykjavík Grapevine. Archived from the original on 25 February 2019. Retrieved 25 February 2019.
  22. ^ Gunnarsson, Davíð Roach (13 March 2019). "Íslensku tónlistarverðlaunin verða afhent í Eldborgarsal Hörpu í kvöld í 37 flokkum. Hátíðin verður í beinni útsendingu sem hefst 18:30 á RÚV2 og 19:50 á aðalrás RÚV, en kynnir er Saga Garðarsdóttir" [The Icelandic Music Prize will be presented in Eldborgarsalur Harpa tonight in 37 categories. The festival will be broadcast live, starting at 18:30 on RUV2 and 19:50 on the main channel of RÚV, which will introduce Saga Garðarsdóttir.]. RÚV (in Icelandic).

External links