Hatikva Quarter

Coordinates: 32°03′N 34°47′E / 32.050°N 34.783°E / 32.050; 34.783
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A street in Hatikva

Hatikva Quarter (Hebrew: שכונת התקווה, Shkhunat Hatikva) is a working class neighbourhood in southeastern Tel Aviv, Israel.

History[edit]

The quarter was founded in 1935, named for "Mount Hope" ("Har HaTikva" in Hebrew), a farm built in 1853 by Protestant Prussian and American Protestants and abandoned. Johann Steinbeck was the grandfather of John Steinbeck and abandoned the colony in 1858 after Arab attackers killed his brother and raped his brother's wife and mother-in-law.[1][2] It became part of the Tel Aviv municipal area after the 1948 Arab–Israeli War.

Shelter hit during the First Gulf War
Beit Dani community center

On 19th January 1991 during the First Gulf War a shelter just in front of Beit Dani was directly hit by an Iraqi Scud rocket. Although the shelter was used by the neighbours regularly, just on this day after the alarm the lock malfunctionned. So, because of this empty shelter no one was hurt or killed.[3] To commemorate the escape an iron memorial (named "Angel of peace") with 3 wings was erected in 1992 in front of Beit Dani, inscribed at the bottom with biblical words in Hebrew ("covering with their wings" (Exodus 25:20)).

Bnei Yehuda Tel Aviv football club played at the Hatikva Neighborhood Stadium until moving to Bloomfield Stadium. The headquarters of the Israeli Labor Party is located there.[4]

Duhl Center for the Performing Arts

The Shevah Mofet school is located on the site of the Steinbeck farm house.[5]

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lior Friedman (5 April 2009). "The mountain of despair". Haaretz. Retrieved 13 January 2014.
  2. ^ ""ענבי זעם" מאת ג'ון סטיינבק | סטיינבק, שכונת התקווה". Haaretz (in Hebrew). 2011-02-09. Retrieved 2018-06-12.
  3. ^ George N. Lewis; Steve Fetter; Lisbeth Gronlund (1993). Casualties and Damage from Scud Attacks in the 1991 Gulf War, Cambridge (Mass.), p. 43
  4. ^ Akiva Eldar (26 December 2002). "People and Politics / Fenced in". Haaretz. Retrieved 13 January 2014.
  5. ^ Tel Aviv municipality http://tel-aviv.millenium.org.il/NR/exeres/747CE319-2E55-49F6-9DED-1B9C50FF0476,frameless.htm

32°03′N 34°47′E / 32.050°N 34.783°E / 32.050; 34.783