Hausa–Fulani

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Hausa–Fulani is a term unique only to Nigeria which collectively refers to the Hausa and Fulani as a people. The two are grouped together because since the Fulani War their histories have become even more intertwined within Nigeria. Although through migration into Hausaland, the Fulani have been part and parcel of Hausa society both as settled and nomadic Fulani since the 1400s.

A significant portion of the Hausa and Fulani societies, especially outside Nigeria are opposed to the use of the hyphenated term, which has been made popular most especially in recent times by its increased use in mass media.[1] Though more than half of all the Fulani in Nigeria have mixed with the Hausa through inter marriage.

The Hausa and Fulani together account for about 33.7% of Nigeria's population according to the CIA World Factbook.[2] Nigeria's other major ethnic groupings are the Yoruba and Igbo.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "Caravans Across the Desert: Marketplace". AFRICA: One Continent. Many Worlds. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County Foundation. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-05-06.
  2. ^ "Ethnic Groups". The World Factbook. CIA. Retrieved 2013-05-21. Listing of ethnic groups including percent of total population