Haute-Corse

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Haute-Corse
Department
Coat of arms of Haute-Corse
Coat of arms
Location of Haute-Corse in France
Location of Haute-Corse in France
Coordinates: 42°28′N 9°12′E / 42.467°N 9.200°E / 42.467; 9.200Coordinates: 42°28′N 9°12′E / 42.467°N 9.200°E / 42.467; 9.200
Country France
Region Corsica
Prefecture Bastia
Subprefectures Calvi
Corte
Government
 • President of the General Council François Orlandi (PRG; since Jan. 20th, 2015)
Area1
 • Total 4,666 km2 (1,802 sq mi)
Population (1999)
 • Total 141,603
 • Rank 93rd
 • Density 30/km2 (79/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Department number 2B
Arrondissements 3
Cantons 15
Communes 236
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Haute-Corse (French pronunciation: ​[ot.kɔʁs]; Corsican: Corsica suprana) (English: Upper Corsica) is a former department of France, consisting of the northern part of the island of Corsica. It and the other Corsican department, Corse-du-Sud, merged on 1 January 2018 with the single collectivity of Corsica, with territorial elections coinciding with the dissolution of the separate councils.[1] The people living in the former department are called "Northerners" (Supranacci).

History[edit]

Map of Haute-Corse

The department was formed on 15 September 1975, when the department of Corsica was divided into Upper Corsica (Haute-Corse) and South Corsica (Corse-du-Sud). The department corresponds exactly to the former department of Golo, which existed between 1793 and 1811.

On 6 July 2003, a referendum on increased autonomy was voted down by a very thin majority: 50.98 percent against to 49.02 percent for. This was a major setback for French Minister of the Interior Nicolas Sarkozy, who had hoped to use Corsica as the first step in his decentralization policies.

Geography[edit]

The former department is surrounded on three sides by the Mediterranean Sea and on the south by the department of Corse-du-Sud.

Tourism[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morgane Rubetti (1 December 2017). "Corse : cinq questions pour comprendre les élections territoriales". Le Figaro. Retrieved 2 December 2017.

External links[edit]