Havers (automobile)

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1913 Havers Six-44 "Knickerbocker Speedster"

The Havers was an automobile built in Port Huron, Michigan by the Havers Motor Car Company from 1911 until 1914. The company was established by brothers Fred and Ernest Havers in 1910, with the first cars being manufactured within the Port Huron Engine & Thresher Company's premises. In 1912 Havers bought the old E-M-F factory (also in Port Huron) and moved production there.[1] The factory suffered a disastrous fire on 7 July 1914, destroying almost everything apart from the offices.[2] While originally planning to resume production within a month, Havers were unable to sway their creditors who forced the company into bankruptcy.[1]

The Havers were conventional in design, except they had a long chassis. All were equipped with L-head six-cylinder engines built by Continental, the 1914 engine being of 6.2 L capacity producing 55 hp (41 kW). The 1913 Model 6-55 Speed Car with two passengers sold for $2,250. In September 1913, the 1914 Havers Six-60 was introduced. It was largely unchanged from the preceding Six-55, aside from having a bored and stroked engine.[3] The windshield and fenders were also redesigned, along with numerous other detail improvements.

Models[edit]

Model(year) Engine HP Bore x Stroke Wheelbase
Six (1911) 331 cu in (5,430 cc) inline-six[4] 44 3 34 in × 5 in (95.3 mm × 127.0 mm) 115 in (2,921 mm)
Six-44 (1912) 36/44 122 in (3,099 mm)
Six-44 (1913) 44 122 in (3,099 mm)[4]
Six-55 (1913) 377 cu in (6,178 cc) inline-six 55 4 in × 5 in (101.6 mm × 127.0 mm) 128 in (3,251 mm)
Six-44 (1914) 331 cu in (5,430 cc) inline-six[4] 40 3 34 in × 5 in (95.3 mm × 127.0 mm) 122 in (3,099 mm)
Six-60 (1914) 421 cu in (6,899 cc) inline-six[3] 60[4] 4 18 in × 5 14 in (104.8 mm × 133.4 mm) 128 in (3,251 mm)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "1912 Havers Six-44". ConceptCarz. Archived from the original on 2014-09-26.
  2. ^ "Fire Damages Havers Factory". Automobile Topics. XXXIV (9): 707. 1914-07-11.
  3. ^ a b "Havers 6-60 Has Larger Motor for 1914". The Automobile. XXIX (12): 522. 2013-09-18.
  4. ^ a b c d Kimes, Beverly (1996). standard catalog of American Cars 1805-1942. Krause publications. p. 684. ISBN 0-87341-428-4.