Haysfield Airport

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Haysfield Airport
Haysfield
Summary
Owner ALFRED BASSLER
Operator ALFRED BASSLER
Serves Clarksville, Maryland
Location Clarksville, Maryland
Built 1974
Occupants 27
Elevation AMSL  m / 420 ft
Coordinates 39°14′N 76°56′W / 39.233°N 76.933°W / 39.233; -76.933Coordinates: 39°14′N 76°56′W / 39.233°N 76.933°W / 39.233; -76.933
Map
MD24 is located in Maryland
MD24
MD24
Location of airport in Maryland
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
13/31 732 2,400 Grass

Haysfield Airport - MD24 was an airport located in Howard County, Maryland

History[edit]

Haysfield Airport started operations in 1974.[1] The airport was founded by Alfred Bassler. Bassler's father owned a large strategic parcel and airfield where Howard Research Associates intended to build the development of Columbia, Maryland. Bassler exchanged land to avoid capital gains for a 504-acre Hayland farm in nearby Clarksville, Maryland where he established Haysfield Airport and a tree nursery.[2] At its peak the airfield hosted 50 aircraft onsite. The airfield faced regular zoning battles throughout its history.[3][4] There were efforts to convert the airport to public use, but the NSA and Maryland Aviation Administration opposed the plan.[5]

After the September 11th attacks, a series of highly restrictive airspace changes now called the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Special Flight Rules Area overlapped the field slowing business.[6] In 2013, the airfield closed by the Bassler family corporation in a 5 to 3 vote in order to create the 159 unit Walnut Creek housing development.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MD24 - Haysfield Airport". SkyVector. Archived from the original on May 29, 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  2. ^ Barnhardt, Laura (19 May 1996). "Farmers: town's forgotten pioneers In 1960s, they sold land to Rouse, making Columbia possible". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved April 14, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Bassler wins appeal for airfield zoning". The Baltimore Sun. 9 June 1982. 
  4. ^ "Zoners allow airstrip amid corn fields". The Baltimore Sun. 28 July 1975. 
  5. ^ Nelson, Erik (January 5, 1995). "Pact for new airport would keep Haysfield rustic". The Baltimore Sun. 
  6. ^ "Baltimore-Area Flight Limits Frustrate Pilots, Choke Small Airports' Business". Tribune Business News. 21 July 2003. 
  7. ^ Holzberg, Janene (19 December 2013). "Clarksville's Basslers say goodbye to family farm, Haysfield Airport". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved April 14, 2016.