Hazlet, New Jersey

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Hazlet, New Jersey
Township of Hazlet
North Centerville section of the township
North Centerville section of the township
Map of Hazlet Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Hazlet Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hazlet, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hazlet, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°25′32″N 74°10′07″W / 40.425627°N 74.16869°W / 40.425627; -74.16869Coordinates: 40°25′32″N 74°10′07″W / 40.425627°N 74.16869°W / 40.425627; -74.16869[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
CountyMonmouth
IncorporatedFebruary 25, 1848 as Raritan Township
RenamedNovember 28, 1967 as Hazlet Township
Named forDr. John Hazlett
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorMichael F. Glackin (R, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • AdministratorDennis Pino[5]
 • Municipal clerkEvelyn A. Grandi[6]
Area
 • Total5.67 sq mi (14.68 km2)
 • Land5.57 sq mi (14.42 km2)
 • Water0.10 sq mi (0.26 km2)  1.76%
Area rank265th of 565 in state
19th of 53 in county[1]
Elevation33 ft (10 m)
Population
 • Total20,334
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
19,664
 • Rank127th of 566 in state
10th of 53 in county[13]
 • Density3,659.4/sq mi (1,412.9/km2)
 • Density rank174th of 566 in state
18th of 53 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)732[16]
FIPS code3402530690[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882120[1][19]
Websitewww.hazlettwp.org

Hazlet is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. It is located in the New York Metropolitan Area and is a bedroom community of New York. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,334,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 1,044 (-4.9%) from the 21,378 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 598 (-2.7%) from the 21,976 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Hazlet is part of the Bayshore Regional Strategic Plan, an effort by nine municipalities in northern Monmouth County to reinvigorate the area's economy by emphasizing the traditional downtowns, dense residential neighborhoods, maritime history, and the natural environment of the Raritan Bayshore coastline.

History[edit]

What is now Hazlet Township was originally incorporated as Raritan Township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 25, 1848, from portions of Middletown Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Holmdel Township (February 23, 1857), Matawan Township (also February 23, 1857, now Aberdeen Township), Keyport (March 17, 1870), Keansburg (March 26, 1917) and Union Beach (March 16, 1925). The township was renamed "Hazlet Township" as of November 28, 1967, based on the results of a referendum held on November 7, 1967.[21] Hazlet derives its name from Dr. John Hazlett, who had an estate in Raritan Township near the Keyport-Holmdel Turnpike, now Holmdel Road.[22][23]

Hazlet was the site of the last drive-in movie theater in New Jersey, the Route 35 Drive-In, which closed in 1991,[24] until the Delsea Drive-In in Vineland reopened in 2004.[25]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 5.67 square miles (14.68 km2), including 5.57 square miles (14.42 km2) of land and 0.10 square miles (0.26 km2) of water (1.76%).[1][2] Hazlet is roughly 37 miles (60 km) south of Manhattan and 56 miles (90 km) northeast of Philadelphia.

Unincorporated communities located partially or completely within Hazlet include Centerville, Mechanicsville, North Centerville, South Keyport, Tiltons Corner, Van Marters Corner and West Keansburg.[26]

The township borders Aberdeen Township, Holmdel Township, Keansburg, Keyport, Middletown Township and Union Beach.[27][28][29]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18504,198
18602,979*−29.0%
18703,443*15.6%
18803,89113.0%
18901,368−64.8%
19001,52411.4%
19101,5833.9%
19201,659*4.8%
19301,568*−5.5%
19401,6626.0%
19502,76366.2%
196015,334455.0%
197022,23945.0%
198023,0133.5%
199021,976−4.5%
200021,378−2.7%
201020,334−4.9%
Est. 201919,664[12][30][31]−3.3%
Population sources:
1850-1920[32] 1850-1870[33]
1850[34] 1870[35] 1880-1890[36]
1890-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census counted 20,334 people, 7,140 households, and 5,526.360 families in the township. The population density was 3,659.4 inhabitants per square mile (1,412.9/km2). There were 7,417 housing units at an average density of 1,334.8 per square mile (515.4/km2). The racial makeup was 91.93% (18,694) White, 1.48% (301) Black or African American, 0.07% (15) Native American, 3.40% (691) Asian, 0.01% (3) Pacific Islander, 1.58% (322) from other races, and 1.51% (308) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.87% (1,601) of the population.[9]

Of the 7,140 households, 33.4% had children under the age of 18; 63.0% were married couples living together; 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present and 22.6% were non-families. Of all households, 19.3% were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.26.[9]

22.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 23.9% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 92.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 89.3 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,415 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,891) and the median family income was $102,743 (+/- $5,511). Males had a median income of $71,710 (+/- $5,920) versus $53,371 (+/- $2,532) for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,051 (+/- $1,340). About 1.2% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[42]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 21,378 people, 7,244 households, and 5,802 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,802.3 people per square mile (1,468.7/km2). There were 7,406 housing units at an average density of 1,317.2 per square mile (508.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.17% White, 1.10% African American, 0.06% Native American, 3.39% Asian, 1.13% from other races, and 1.15% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.87% of the population.[40][41]

There were 7,244 households, out of which 37.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.2% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.9% were non-families. 17.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.32.[40][41]

In the township the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the township was $65,697, and the median income for a family was $71,361. Males had a median income of $51,776 versus $32,439 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,262. About 2.3% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.6% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Hazlet is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[43] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][44] The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are elected annually by the Committee from among its five members at a reorganization meeting held each January.

As of 2020, members of the Hazlet Township Committee are Mayor Michael F. Glackin (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2022; term as mayor ends 2020), Deputy Mayor Tara Clark (R, term on committee ends 2021; term as deputy mayor ends 2020), Scott Aagre (R, 2022), James "Skip" McKay (R, 2021) and Michael Sachs (R, 2020; elected to serve an unexpired term).[3][45][46][47][48][49]

In January 2019, former councilmember Michael Sachs was selected to fill the council seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by Susan Kiley until she resigned to take office on the Monmouth County Board of chosen freeholders.[50] Sachs served on an interim basis until the November 2019 general election, when he was chosen to serve the balance of the term of office.[47]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Hazlet Township is located in the 6th Congressional District[51] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[10][52][53]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Sixth Congressional District is represented by Frank Pallone (D, Long Branch).[54][55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[57][58]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 13th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver) and in the General Assembly by Gerard Scharfenberger (R, Middletown Township) and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township).[59][60]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[61] As of 2020, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2022; term as freeholder director ends 2021),[62] Freeholder Deputy Director Susan M. Kiley (R, Hazlet Township, term as freeholder ends December 31, 2021; term as deputy freeholder director ends 2021),[63] Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township, 2020),[64] Nick DiRocco (R, Wall Township, 2022),[65] and Patrick G. Impreveduto (R, Holmdel Township, 2020)[66].

Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon (R, 2020; Ocean Township),[67][68] Sheriff Shaun Golden (R, 2022; Howell Township),[69][70] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (R, 2021; Middletown Township).[71][72]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 13,685 registered voters in Hazlet Township, of which 3,679 (26.9%) were registered as Democrats, 2,606 (19.0%) were registered as Republicans and 7,388 (54.0%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[73]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 51.8% of the vote (4,844 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 46.6% (4,365 votes), and other candidates with 1.6% (148 votes), among the 9,430 ballots cast by the township's 13,851 registered voters (73 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 68.1%.[74][75] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 54.0% of the vote (5,732 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 43.5% (4,618 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (139 votes), among the 10,617 ballots cast by the township's 14,345 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.0%.[76] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 56.2% of the vote (5,756 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 42.7% (4,375 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (86 votes), among the 10,249 ballots cast by the township's 13,777 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.4.[77]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 72.0% of the vote (4,164 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.3% (1,524 votes), and other candidates with 1.7% (97 votes), among the 5,883 ballots cast by the township's 13,838 registered voters (98 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.5%.[78][79] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.7% of the vote (4,517 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 26.2% (1,805 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 6.1% (420 votes) and other candidates with 1.3% (87 votes), among the 6,877 ballots cast by the township's 13,927 registered voters, yielding a 49.4% turnout.[80]

Education[edit]

The Hazlet Township Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade.[81] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of eight schools, had an enrollment of 2,871 students and 254.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.3:1.[82] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[83]) are Sycamore Drive Early Childhood Learning Center[84] (295 students; in PreK-K), Lillian Drive Elementary School[85] (252; 1-4), Middle Road Elementary School[86] (277; 1-4), Raritan Valley Elementary School[87] (243; 1-4), Beers Street Elementary School[88] (225; 5-6), Cove Road Elementary School[89] (178; 5-6), Hazlet Middle School[90] (451; 7-8) and Raritan High School[91] (922; 9-12).[92][93]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The Garden State Parkway, the largest and busiest highway in Hazlet

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 77.19 miles (124.23 km) of roadways, of which 67.20 miles (108.15 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.41 miles (7.10 km) by Monmouth County and 4.39 miles (7.07 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[94]

Route 35, Route 36 and County Route 516 are within Hazlet Township's borders. The Garden State Parkway also runs through and provides easy access to the Jersey Shore or destinations in North Jersey and New York City.[95] The Parkway's interchange 117, labeled for Keyport / Hazlet, is located within the township.[96]

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit service is available at the Hazlet station[97] offering travel on the North Jersey Coast Line to Hoboken Terminal, Newark Penn Station and New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan.[98]

NJ Transit provides local bus service on the 817 route.[99]

Through rail freight service is provided by Conrail Shared Assets Operations, which provides freight service between South Amboy and Lakehurst via Red Bank.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Hazlet include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Township of Hazlet. Accessed April 23, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Administration, Township of Hazlet. Accessed April 23, 2020.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Township of Hazlet. Accessed April 23, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 67.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Hazlet, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Hazlet township, Monmouth County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 15, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Hazlet, New Jersey, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 25, 2012.
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  22. ^ History of Hazlet, Hazlet Township. Accessed August 22, 2020.
  23. ^ Staff. "Hazlet: A brief history", Asbury Park Press, August 30, 2007. Accessed August 22, 2020. "The name Hazlet is taken from an early resident, Dr. John Hazlett, who came from New York City to purchase land and settle here more than 100 years ago....1967 Raritan Township's name is changed to Hazlet to give it a clearer identity. Before the change, it was one of three towns known as Raritan in the state."
  24. ^ New Jersey Drive-In Theaters, State of New Jersey. Accessed July 5, 2007. "New Jersey's last drive-in theater, Hazlet's Route 35 Drive-In, closed in 1991."
  25. ^ Strauss, Robert. "The Drive-In Theater Tries a Comeback; Looking for a Few Hundred Adventurous Moviegoers", The New York Times, July 23, 2004. Accessed August 26, 2018. "He will be back in his old place, the Delsea Drive-In projection booth, rolling a double feature, as the theater reopens with The Bourne Supremacy and Anchorman. It will be the first drive-in movie showing in New Jersey -- the state that spawned the craze in the 1930s -- since the Route 35 Drive-In in Hazlet closed in 1991."
  26. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  27. ^ Areas touching Hazlet Township, MapIt. Accessed May 17, 2015.
  28. ^ Regional Location Map, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 24, 2020.
  29. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
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  32. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 11, 2013. 1870 value of 1,077 is in conflict with population of 3,443 shown in 1870 Census, with the difference appearing in the population shown for Keyport of 2,366 in 1870, the year in which it was formed.
  33. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 251-2, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 11, 2013. "Raritan township in 1850 contained 4,198 inhabitants; in 1860, 2,979; and in 1870, 3,443."
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  50. ^ "Michael Sachs Takes Sue Kiley’s Seat On Hazlet Township Committee", More Monmouth Musings, January 18, 2019. Accessed April 23, 2020. "Long time community leader Michael Sachs returned to the Hazlet Township Committee this week after a two year hiatus. Sachs, 59, was appointed to the committee to fill the vacancy created when Sue Kiley resigned upon becoming a Monmouth County Freeholder. Sachs, a Republican, is expected to seek Hazlet voters approval in November to complete the term which expires on December 31, 2020."
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  56. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  57. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  64. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  65. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 18, 2020.
  66. ^ Freeholder Patrick Impreveduto, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 18, 2018.
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  81. ^ Hazlet Township Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 23, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through twelve in the Hazlet Township School District. Composition: The Hazlet Township School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Hazlet Township."
  82. ^ District information for Hazlet Township Public School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
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  84. ^ Sycamore Drive Early Childhood Learning Center, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  85. ^ Lilian Drive Elementary School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  86. ^ Middle Road Elementary School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  87. ^ Raritan Valley Elementary School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  88. ^ Beers Street Elementary School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  89. ^ Cove Road Elementary School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  90. ^ Hazlet Middle School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  91. ^ Hazlet High School, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  92. ^ District Map, Hazlet Township Public Schools. Accessed April 24, 2020.
  93. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Hazlet Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  94. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 14, 2014.
  95. ^ Garden State Parkway Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, January 1997. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  96. ^ Travel Resources: Interchanges, Service Areas & Commuter Lots, New Jersey Turnpike Authority. Accessed July 25, 2014.
  97. ^ Hazlet station, NJ Transit. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  98. ^ North Jersey Coast Line, NJ Transit. Accessed October 16, 2013.
  99. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  100. ^ Fabricant, Florence. "New Wave in the East River: David Burke", The New York Times, November 9, 1988. Accessed June 28, 2012. "These are heady accomplishments for someone who grew up thinking that the ultimate dessert was a Yodel, and who first set foot in a professional kitchen at 15, as a dishwasher in a Sheraton Inn near his home in Hazlet, N.J."
  101. ^ Lubasch, Arnold H. "7 Convicted of Racketeering, 1 Acquitted, in Westies Trial", The New York Times, February 25, 1988. Accessed November 7, 2007. "The other defendants range in age from 31 to 54, and all live in Manhattan, except the Coonans, who moved to Hazlet, N.J."
  102. ^ via Associated Press. "Kent captures Cardinal 500", Lakeland Ledger, November 1, 1982. Accessed December 4, 2012. "Both cars caught fire after the Firenza driven by Ray Evernham of Hazlet, hit the backstretch wall and the Firenza driven by Tony Siscone of Hammonton, N. J., crashed into him at an estimated 100 mph."
  103. ^ Falkenstein, Michelle. "From Maplewood To Sundance", The New York Times, January 30, 2005. Accessed August 26, 2018. "In 1988, Daniel Johnston, a songwriter, gave a legendary concert in Pier Platters, an independent Hoboken record store. 'He had a mental breakdown during the concert and ran amok for two weeks,' said Jeff Feuerzeig, who grew up in Hazlet and Morganville and attended Trenton State College."
  104. ^ Hyman, Vicki. "'Jersey Shore': Meet Sammi Sweetheart, college athlete", The Star-Ledger, December 14, 2009. Accessed January 31, 2011. "Sam Giancola of Hazlet (the only actual New Jerseyan on the show) is a senior sociology major at William Paterson University where she plays Division III soccer (hence the WPU athletic wear she sports in the series)."
  105. ^ Rutgers Men's Soccer Hosts Connecticut in the Second Annual Doug Hamilton Memorial Soccer Classic Archived 2012-03-23 at the Wayback Machine, Rutgers University press release dated April 4, 2008. Accessed June 23, 2011. "The Doug Hamilton Memorial Classic is a tribute to Hazlet native, who starred on the Raritan High School soccer team (Raritan class of 1981) and went on to a distinguished career including President and General Manager of both the Miami Fusion (2000-2002) and the Los Angeles Galaxy (2002-2006) of Major League Soccer."
  106. ^ Dunleavy, Ryan. "Bennett Jackson of Hazlet starts anew in Giants rookie mini-camp", Asbury Park Press, May 9, 2015. Accessed May 17, 2015. "Jackson is one of 17 second-year pros among the 66 players in rookie mini-camp with the Giants, though the Raritan High School product has the same amount of regular-season game experience as those new to the NFL."
  107. ^ Davis, Mike. "Joey Janela: How the Asbury Park 'Bad Boy' made Spring Break a wrestling 'revolution'", Asbury Park Press, April 3, 2019, updated September 26, 2019. Accessed May 26, 2020. "In the days afterward, Janela, a lifelong Hazlet resident who had moved to Asbury Park, would confirm that nearly every tendon in his knee was some combination of strained, torn, ruptured or 'completely destroyed.'"
  108. ^ O'Brien, Daniel. "Jersey Shore: Worst Thing to Happen to East Coast Since 9/11", Cracked.com, December 11, 2009. Accessed July 25, 2014. "Sammi receives special distinction because, as much as it pains me to say this, she is from my home town of Hazlet, New Jersey.... I'd also like to point out that, since she's on a television show, this officially makes me the second most famous person from Hazlet, New Jersey, which is..."
  109. ^ Staff. "Skip O'Brien: Obituary", Asbury Park Press, April 8, 2011. Accessed August 9, 2012. "Born Bernard Francis O'Brien in Jersey City, Skip moved to Union Beach as a young boy, and lived there until he entered the U.S. Marine Corps in 1968. After graduating from Brookdale College in 1980, he moved to California to pursue his dream of becoming an actor.... He relocated to Hazlet in 2010 to be close to his family."
  110. ^ Columbia Football Games to Air Locally on WSNR, 620 AM, Columbia University press release dated September 5, 2006. Accessed December 19, 2007. "Recco is a 1998 graduate of New Jersey City University. He currently resides in Hazlet, New Jersey."
  111. ^ "Wildcats Add Reddy to Staff; Former Malmö, Rutgers Star Named Assistant Coach", New Jersey Wildcats, April 26, 2006. Accessed November 17, 2017. "Following her standout career at Rutgers, the Hazlet, NJ native joined the Swedish club Umeå IK for one season in 1995 before moving to Malmö DFF for the next 10 seasons.... A Raritan High School graduate, Reddy appeared in 336 games during her career with Malmö and was a fan favorite."
  112. ^ Doerschuk, Andy. "Dave Witte of Municipal Waste", DRUM! Magazine, March 26, 2010. Accessed July 25, 2014. "Hometown: Hazlet, NJ"

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