Head (geology)

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Head describes deposits consisting of fragmented material which, following weathering, have moved downslope through a process of solifluction. The term has been used by British geologists since the middle of the 19th century to describe such material in a range of different settings from flat hilltops to the bottoms of valleys.[1] Areas identified as head include deposits of aeolian origin such as blown sand and loess, slope deposits such as gelifluctates and solifluctates, and recently eroded soil material, called colluvium. With geologists becoming more interested in studying the near-surface environment and its related processes, the term head is becoming obsolete.

A related term is 'combe (or coombe) rock', descriptive of a body of chalk and flint fragments contained within a mass of chalky earth typically found on the chalk downlands of south-east England and resulting from freeze-thaw processes. Where the mass is also soliflucted, it is considered a variety of head.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Melville , R.V. and Freshney, R.C. 1982 British Regional Geology: the Hampshire Basin and adjoining areas 4th edn Institute of Geological Sciences p125 ISBN 011884203X
  2. ^ Whitten, D.G.A. and Brooks, J.R.V. 1972 The Penguin Dictionary of Geology ISBN 0140510494
  3. ^ Melville , R.V. and Freshney, R.C. 1982 British Regional Geology: the Hampshire Basin and adjoining areas 4th edn Institute of Geological Sciences p125 ISBN 011884203X