Health in Latvia

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The Latvian healthcare system is a universal programme, largely funded through government taxation.[1] It was among the lowest-ranked healthcare systems in Europe, due to excessive waiting times for treatment, insufficient access to the latest medicines, and other factors.[2] There were 59 hospitals in Latvia in 2009, down from 94 in 2007, and 121 in 2006.[3][4][5]

Since 2012 performance has improved considerably, with a reduction in infant mortality from 6.2 per thousand births to 3.9 in two years. [6]

See List of hospitals in Latvia.

Corruption is relatively widespread in the Latvian healthcare system, although the situation has improved since the early 1990s. It has been noted that an environment conducive to corruption has been promulgated by low salaries and poorly implemented systemic reforms.[7] This also results in brain drain, mostly to Western EU nations.[citation needed] According to the survey conducted by the Euro health consumer index in 2015 Latvia was among the European countries in which unofficial payments to doctors were reported most commonly.[8]

As of 2009, there were approximately 8,600 inhabitants of Latvia living with HIV/AIDS, accounting for a 0.7% adult HIV prevalence rate. There were 32,376 (1.44%) individual instances of clinically reported alcoholism in Latvia in 2008, as well as cases of addictions to other substances.[9] The annual number of births per 1,000 adolescent women aged 15 to 19 has declined from 49.9 in 1990 to 17.9 in 2007.[10] In 2005, Latvia had a suicide rate of 24.5 per 100,000 inhabitants (down from 40.7 in 1995), the 7th highest in the world.[11] Latvia achieved a remarkable improvement in infant mortality from 6.2/1000 births in 2012 to 3.9/1000 in 2014. [12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Latvia's Healthcare System is Funded by General Taxation and All Latvians and Foreign Residents Are Guaranteed Medical Care | Find Articles at BNET". Findarticles.com. 18 November 2005. Retrieved 5 February 2010. [dead link]
  2. ^ The Baltic Course – Балтийский курс (14 November 2008). "Latvia has worst health care system in Europe :: The Baltic Course | Baltic States news & analytics". The Baltic Course. Retrieved 5 February 2010. 
  3. ^ David Jolly (18 June 2009). "Latvian Health Official Resigns Over Cuts". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 April 2010. 
  4. ^ "The basic indicators of health care, at the end of the year". Csb.gov.lv. 22 January 2010. Archived from the original on 16 December 2007. Retrieved 5 February 2010. [dead link]
  5. ^ "The Baltic States and their health systems – From Soviet to EU". European-Hospital. Retrieved 5 February 2010. 
  6. ^ "Outcomes in EHCI 2015" (PDF). Health Consumer Powerhouse. 26 January 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2016. 
  7. ^ David Hayhurst. "Fighting Corruption in Health Care Services". World Bank. Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 5 February 2010. [dead link]
  8. ^ "Outcomes in EHCI 2015" (PDF). Health Consumer Powerhouse. 26 January 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2016. 
  9. ^ "Incidence of alcoholism, narcotic and psychotropic substances habit". Csb.gov.lv. 22 January 2010. Archived from the original on 16 December 2007. Retrieved 5 February 2010. [dead link]
  10. ^ "2010 Update for the MDG database:Adolescent birth rate". United Nations. 5 September 2010. Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  11. ^ "WHO | Country reports and charts available". Who.int. 7 December 2009. Retrieved 5 February 2010. 
  12. ^ "Outcomes in EHCI 2015" (PDF). Health Consumer Powerhouse. 26 January 2016. Retrieved 27 January 2016.