Health in Montenegro

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Life expectancy is 72 years for men and 76 years for women.

In 2015 it was estimated that 12% of the population of Montenegro had diabetes.[1]

Healthcare[edit]

According to the Health Consumer Powerhouse the country has "the most backward health system in Europe". Public services are financed through the Health Insurance Fund. It is funded by payroll contributions of 10.5%. About 5% of the national budget is allocated to healthcare. Only €5 million was provided for all public hospital supplies in 2016, about a third of what was thought necessary. 72.5% of total health spending comes from the fund. Most of the rest is direct out-of-pocket payments.

Facilities[edit]

There are three specialist centres:

  • The Podgorica Clinical Center is the main public hospital. Necessary supplies were calculated to cost €11.4 million in 2016. It was reported that there were severe shortages of basic supplies and equipment in public hospitals. Tests were repeatedly postponed because of lack of supplies or broken equipment. Many patients are referred for treatment outside the country.
  • Institute for Health
  • Pharmaceutical Institute of Montenegro

In 2003 there were eighteen public medical centres, and seven general hospitals.[2]

Staffing[edit]

Compared to other European countries it has the lowest number of doctors per capita, the lowest doctors’ salaries in relation to GDP, the worst medical education[3] and the lowest proportion of pharmacists per head in Europe - 17 per 100,000 in 2015.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top 10: Which country has the highest rates of diabetes in Europe? The UK's position might surprise you…". Diabetes UK. 27 August 2015. Retrieved 20 December 2015.
  2. ^ "Montenegro Health Insurance". Pacific Prime. 2018. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Financial Crisis Threatens Healthcare in Montenegro". Balkan Insight. 12 April 2016. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  4. ^ Ballas, Dimitris; Dorling, Danny; Hennig, Benjamin (2017). The Human Atlas of Europe. Bristol: Policy Press. p. 83. ISBN 9781447313540.