Healthcare in Europe

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European Health Insurance Card (French version pictured)

Healthcare in Europe is provided through a wide range of different systems run at individual national levels. Most European countries have a system of competing private health insurance companies, with government subsidies available for citizens who cannot afford coverage.[1][2] Many European countries (and all European Union countries) offer their citizens a European Health Insurance Card which, on a reciprocal basis, provides insurance for emergency medical treatment insurance when visiting other participating European countries.[citation needed]

European health[edit]

The World Health Organization has listed 53 countries as comprising the European region. Health outcomes vary greatly by country. Countries in western Europe have had a significant increase in life expectancy since World War II, while most of eastern European and the formerly Soviet countries have experienced a fall in life expectancy.[3]

Tobacco use is the largest preventable cause of death in Europe. Many countries have passed legislation in the past few decades restricting tobacco sales and use.[3]

European Union[edit]

The European Union has no major administrative responsibility in the field of healthcare. The European Commission's Directorate-General for Health and Consumers however seeks to align national laws on the safety of food and other products, on consumers' rights and on the protection of people's health, to form new EU wide laws and thus strengthen its internal markets.

Greece failed to implement EU anti-smoking laws.[4] The case of Greece raised the debate among Europeans[who?] as to why, in a union of common valies, the EU moved to enforce tax laws in member states, but not health laws which support fundamental human rights.[citation needed]

Healthcare rankings[edit]

Euro Health Consumer Index 2017[5]
Country Ranking Total Score Patient rights & Information Accessibility (waiting times) Outcomes Range and reach of services provided Prevention Pharmaceuticals
 Netherlands 1 924 125 200 278 125 107 89
  Switzerland 2 898 117 225 278 94 101 83
 Denmark 3 864 117 118 267 120 95 119
 Norway 4 850 125 125 289 115 119 78
 Luxembourg 5 850 104 213 244 109 107 72
 Finland 6 856 108 150 289 120 101 78
 Germany 7 836 108 188 267 83 101 89
 Belgium 8 832 108 213 233 115 95 72
 Iceland 9 830 117 175 256 115 113 56
 France 10 825 104 188 256 99 95 83
 Austria 11 816 113 188 233 104 101 78
 Sweden 12 807 113 113 278 125 101 78
 Slovakia 13 749 113 225 189 73 83 67
 Portugal 14 747 108 137 233 89 107 72
 United Kingdom 15 735 113 100 222 109 113 78
 Slovenia 16 726 108 163 211 89 83 72
 Czech Republic 17 726 79 188 222 104 77 56
 Spain 18 695 88 113 222 94 107 72
 Estonia 19 691 113 163 189 89 77 61
 Serbia 20 673 104 200 167 57 89 56
 Italy 21 673 88 150 211 73 101 50
 Macedonia 22 649 108 200 133 63 89 56
 Malta 23 642 88 150 167 104 95 39
 Ireland 24 630 75 88 211 78 95 83
 Montenegro 25 623 88 200 156 52 77 50
 Croatia 26 620 96 138 178 94 65 50
 Albania 27 596 88 213 156 42 65 33
 Latvia 28 587 104 138 156 68 77 44
 Poland 29 584 79 125 167 63 95 56
 Hungary 30 584 79 138 156 78 89 44
 Lithuania 31 574 104 138 144 78 65 44
 Greece 32 569 58 125 200 52 83 50
 Bulgaria 33 548 67 175 156 47 65 39
 Romania 34 439 71 113 122 52 48 33
 Cyprus x x x x x x x x

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sanger-Katz, Margot (19 February 2019). "What's the Difference Between a 'Public Option' and 'Medicare for All'?". The New York Times.
  2. ^ Abelson, Reed; Sanger-Katz, Margot (23 March 2019). "Medicare for All Would Abolish Private Insurance. 'There's No Precedent in American History.'". The New York Times.
  3. ^ a b Mackenbach, Johan P; Karanikolos, Marina; McKee, Martin (March 2013). "The unequal health of Europeans: successes and failures of policies". The Lancet. 381 (9872): 1125–1134. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(12)62082-0.
  4. ^ "EU anti-smoking laws".
  5. ^ Arna, Björnberg (2018). "Euro Health Consumer Index 2017" (PDF). Health Consumer Powerhouse. ISBN 978-91-980687-5-7.