Heathcote Valley

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Heathcote Valley
Suburb
There is a gondola on the Port Hills above Heathcote Valley
View from gondola into Heathcote Valley
Area
 • Total7.3746 km2 (2.8473 sq mi)
Elevation
100 m (300 ft)
Population
 (2006)
 • Total1,983
 • Density270/km2 (700/sq mi)

Heathcote Valley is a suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand. It is named after Sir William Heathcote, who was secretary of the Canterbury Association.[1][2]

Location[edit]

Nestled at the foot of the steep volcanic crags that form the northern edge of the hills, some 8 kilometres (5 mi) southeast of the city centre the Heathcote Valley is dominated by the approaches to the Lyttelton road tunnel, a major arterial that passes through the Port Hills. The road is part of the State Highway 74 network. The Main South Railway line also passes through the suburb, before entering the Lyttelton rail tunnel that connects with the port of Lyttelton.

Heathcote Valley is the lower terminus of the Christchurch Gondola, which goes up to Mount Cavendish on the Port Hills,[3] and also for the Bridle Path walking track over the northern rim of the Lyttelton volcano to the port of Lyttelton.

History[edit]

Heathcote grain silos falling to the wreckers ball on 26 January 2012

In the past the Heathcote Valley was known for its orchards, brickworks and maltworks. The distinctive towers of the Canterbury Malting Company's maltworks dominated the skyline until 2012 - when along with the rest of the remaining buildings were demolished to make way for residential developments.[4]

Relation to Heathcote River[edit]

Despite its name, Heathcote Valley is situated some two kilometres south of the Heathcote River, which does not flow through the suburb but rather flows east across a wide plain.

Notable residents[edit]

  • Wally Argus – New Zealand rugby international who bought a market garden in Heathcote Valley in 1949
  • Bob Parker – former mayor of Christchurch was brought up here

Further reading[edit]

  • In The Shadow Of The Rock, 150 Years of Heathcote Valley, 2010, Paul Corliss ISBN 9780473169220

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Heathcote". NZ History. New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 29 August 2018.
  2. ^ "Heathcote Valley & River". Peeling Back History. Annette Bulovic. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  3. ^ "THE CHRISTCHURCH GONDOLA OPENED – 24TH OCTOBER 1992". PEELING BACK HISTORY. Retrieved 29 August 2018.
  4. ^ http://canterbury.cyberplace.co.nz/community/CAFCA/cafca00/Jul00.html Background reading on the company closure

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°35′S 172°43′E / 43.583°S 172.717°E / -43.583; 172.717