Heather Garriock

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Heather Garriock
Heather Garriock-SydneyFC.jpg
Garriock playing for Sydney FC in 2010
Personal information
Full name Heather Ann Garriock
Date of birth (1982-12-21) 21 December 1982 (age 34)
Place of birth Sydney, Australia
Height 5 ft 5 in (1.65 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
Leppington Lions Soccer Club
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Marconi Stallions
1996–2002 NSW Sapphires
2002–2003 Queensland Sting
2005–2006 NSW Sapphires
2007 Adirondack Lynx 11 (10)
2007–2008 Fortuna Hjørring
2008–2009 Sydney FC 4 (1)
2009 Chicago Red Stars 5 (0)
2009–2011 Sydney FC 19 (5)
2011 LdB FC Malmö 8 (0)
2011–2012 Sydney FC 6 (2)
2013 Marconi Stallions
2013–2014 Western Sydney Wanderers 8 (2)
National team
1999– Australia 130 (20)
Teams managed
2014– Sydney Uni women
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 10 March 2014.
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 17 July 2011

Heather Ann Garriock (born 21 December 1982) is an Australian soccer coach and former player. Garriock played as a midfielder in a career based mostly in Australia. Her last stint as a player was for Western Sydney Wanderers of the Australian W-League. Garriock played 130 matches for the Australian women's national team, appearing at three Olympic football tournaments and three FIFA Women's World Cups.

Playing career[edit]

Club career[edit]

Garriock began her career playing football in Australia. She played for Marconi Stallions, NSW Sapphires, and Queensland Sting before moving overseas.

She signed with Adirondack Lynx of Women's Premier Soccer League in 2006. She made six appearances in 2006 before returning to the Australian National Team. In 2007, she made a further five appearances. In total, she made 11 appearances for Adirondack Lynx, while scoring 10 goals and chipping in eight assists.[1]

Garriock was on the move once again in 2008, playing for Fortuna Hjørring in Denmark, before moving back to Australia to play for Sydney FC in the Australian W-League.[2]

In 2009, Garriock was selected for the Women's Professional Soccer league in the United States. In the 2008 WPS International Draft, she was picked 12th overall by Chicago Red Stars. For the inaugural 2009 Women's Professional Soccer season, she appeared for Chicago in 5 games (0 starts, 89 total minutes) and recorded an assist. It was announced on 30 September 2009 that Chicago had waived their option for a second year, thus making Garriock a free agent.[3]

She returned to her previous team, Sydney FC, following her release from Chicago.

In October 2013, Garriock joined Western Sydney Wanderers.[4]

Garriock retired from national league football after the 2013–14 W-League season.[5]

International career[edit]

Garriock playing for Australia

Garriock first represented the Australia in October 1999 in a friendly against China at 16 years old. She has represented her country in the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney as well as the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens.[6][7]

She has also appeared for Australia in the 2003 and 2007 editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup. She scored two goals in 2003 and one in 2007.[8]

In 2013, Garriock was selected for a national team tour that included a match against the United States, though did not play in the match. After the tour, Football Federation Australia denied a claim from Garriock to cover childcare expenses for her young daughter. A subsequent appeal to the New South Wales Civil and Administrative Tribunal was unsuccessful.[9][10]

Coaching career[edit]

Garriock was appointed senior head coach of the Sydney Uni SFC women's first team in 2014.[11][12]

In 2017, Garriock was appointed an assistant coach of Australia for the 2017 Algarve Cup.[13]

Personal[edit]

Garriock was born in Campbelltown in the western suburbs of Sydney. She attended Westfields Sports High School.[14][15]

Garriock started the Macarthur Youth Football Academy, based in the southwestern Sydney area of Camden.[16]

In 2003, Garriock's brother, Nathan, died from injuries sustained during an altercation at a party he attended in Camden, NSW.[17][18]

Career statistics[edit]

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Australia's goal tally first.

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 2 June 2000 Sydney Football Stadium, Sydney, Australia  China PR 1–1 1–1 Friendly
2 19 January 2002 Tom Flood Sports Centre, Bendigo, Australia  South Korea 4–1 4–1 Friendly
3 5 April 2003 Belconnen Soccer Centre, Canberra, Australia  Samoa 15–0 19–0 2003 OFC Women's Championship
4 9 April 2003 Belconnen Soccer Centre, Canberra, Australia  Papua New Guinea 9–0 13–0 2003 OFC Women's Championship
5 11–0
6 13–0
7 25 September 2003 Home Depot Center, Los Angeles, United States  China PR 1–0 1–1 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
8 28 September 2003 Providence Park, Portland, United States  Ghana 1–2 1–2 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
9 14 August 2004 Pankritio Stadium, Heraklion, Greece  Greece 1–0 1–0 2004 Olympics
10 1 February 2005 Quanzhou Sports Center, Quanzhou, China  Russia 1–0 5–0 2005 Four Nations Tournament
11 23 February 2007 Zhongshan Soccer Stadium, Taipei, Taiwan  Uzbekistan 6–0 10–0 2008 Olympics qualifying
12 12 August 2007 BCU International Stadium  Chinese Taipei 3–0 7–0 2008 Olympics qualifying
13 19 August 2007 Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium, Tianjin, China  China PR 1–0 3–1 Friendly
14 12 September 2007 Yellow Dragon Sports Center, Hangzhou, China  Ghana 4–0 4–1 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
15 29 May 2008 Thống Nhất Stadium, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  Chinese Taipei 1–0 4–0 2008 AFC Women's Asian Cup
16 2–0
17 15 June 2008 Suwon Sports Complex, Suwon, South Korea  United States 1–1 1–2 2008 Peace Queen Cup
18 17 June 2008 Suwon Sports Complex, Suwon, South Korea  Italy 1–0 3–0 2008 Peace Queen Cup
19 2–0
20 20 February 2010 Bill McKinlay Park, Auckland, New Zealand  New Zealand 1–0 3–0 Friendly

Honours[edit]

Playing[edit]

Club[edit]

NSW Sapphires
Fortuna Hjørring
Sydney FC
LdB FC Malmö

Country[edit]

Australia

Individual[edit]

Coaching[edit]

Sydney Uni SFC
  • NPL NSW Womens 1 Coach of the Year: 2014[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Australian World Cup Player and Olympian, Heather Garriock selected 12th overall in the WPS International Draft". Adirondack Lynx. 24 September 2008. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  2. ^ Ormond, Aidan (30 January 2009). "Garriock Back To Haunt Italians". Australian FourFourTwo. Haymarket Media. Retrieved 30 January 2009. 
  3. ^ "WPS Free Agency Opens". Chicago Red Stars. 30 September 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  4. ^ "Wanderers announce strong squad for upcoming W-League season". The Women's Game. 10 October 2013. 
  5. ^ Odong, Ann (18 January 2016). "Heather Garriock slips quietly into retirement". Zela. Special Broadcasting Service. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  6. ^ "Centurion still has many caps ahead of her". Football Federation Australia. 3 May 2008. Retrieved 3 March 2008. 
  7. ^ "Athletes - Heather Garriock". Australian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  8. ^ "FIFA Tournaments - Players & Coaches - Heather Garriock". FIFA. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  9. ^ Adno, Carly (8 April 2016). "Former Matilda Heather Garriock says she'll continue her fight for better support for footballing mothers". Daily Telegraph. News Corp Australia. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  10. ^ Foster, Craig (9 April 2016). "Heather Garriock case demonstrates that football in Australia needs to take better care of its family". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 6 March 2017. 
  11. ^ "Heather Garriock appointed as SUSFC Women's Premier League Head Coach". Sydney Uni Soccer Football Club. 28 March 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  12. ^ "Women's NPL1". Sydney Uni Soccer Football Club. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  13. ^ "Garriock to share Matildas assistant role". The World Game. Special Broadcasting Servie. 12 February 2017. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  14. ^ "Campbelltown-born Garriock leads by example in W-League". Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser. Fairfax Regional Media. 12 November 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  15. ^ "Hall of Fame". Westfields Sports High School. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  16. ^ Garriock, Heather (19 June 2011). "This Sporting Life: Heather Garriock". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  17. ^ Glendinning, Lee (29 July 2003). "Teen bashed to death after car hit partygoers, court told". The Sydney Morning Herald. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 30 January 2009. 
  18. ^ "Family heartbreak of Matildas ace Garriock". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 27 September 2003. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  19. ^ "Women's NSL - Season 1999/2000 - Finals". OzFootball. 
  20. ^ "Mori picks up award". The World Game. Special Broadcasting Service. Sportal. 4 June 2003. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 
  21. ^ "Winners galore at Premier Leagues Gala Dinner". Football NSW. 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017. 

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Sarah Walsh
Western Sydney Wanderers captain
2013–2014
Succeeded by
Caitlin Cooper