Hedley Thomas

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Hedley Thomas is an Australian investigative journalist and author.

Hedley Thomas

Personal life[edit]

Thomas was born to Diana and Hedley Robert Thomas. Thomas' father is a former Royal Australian Air Force pilot[1] and instructed retired senior commander of the Royal Australian Air Force, Angus Houston.[citation needed]

Thomas went to a number of different primary and high schools across Australia, finishing year 12 at Keebra Park high school in Southport on the Gold Coast.[citation needed]

Thomas is married and lives in Brisbane. He has two children.[2] In 2002 Thomas and his family were victims of a death threat and a drive-by shooting.[2]

Career[edit]

Soon after completing high school, Thomas started his career as a newspaper copy boy for the Gold Coast Bulletin in 1984.[2]

After nine months as a copy boy he started a journalism cadetship at the Gold Coast Bulletin, then in 1988 moved to The Courier-Mail in Brisbane.[2][3] After a year, he moved to London as a foreign correspondent for News Limited Australia for two years.[citation needed] As a 22-year-old journalist there he covered historic events such as the fall of the Berlin wall and the Romanian Revolution.[4]

Thomas returned to The Courier-Mail in late 1991, working there for 18 months.[2][3] Thomas then moved to become the News Editor at the Hong Kong Standard for six months, before moving to the South China Morning Post in late 1993.[2][3] There Thomas served in a variety of roles, including Senior Reporter, Deputy Features Editor, and Senior Writer.[3]

In 1999 Thomas returned to Brisbane and The Courier-Mail.[3] In 2006 Thomas moved to the Brisbane bureau of The Australian.[3]

After winning the Gold Walkley in 2007, Thomas left journalism in early 2008 to work in the resources sector, with a role in communications, investor and government relations.[5] Thomas returned to journalism and The Australian around 2010.[3]

Thomas has written "Sick to Death", a non-fiction book published by Allen & Unwin about the Jayant Patel case.[3]

Thomas recently covered the AWU affair.

Awards[edit]

Thomas has won several major awards in journalism, including the 2007 Gold Walkley for highlighting the flawed police pursuit of Mohamed Haneef, an innocent doctor accused of being a terrorist.[6]

Other awards include:

  • 2012 Queensland Clarion Award for Journalist of the Year[7]
  • 2012 Queensland Clarion Award for Best Investigative 2012 for highlighting evidence overlooked by the judicial inquiry into the operation of the Wivenhoe Dam during the 2011 Queensland floods[7]
  • 2007 Walkley for Best Print New story, for the Haneef story.[8]
  • 2005 Walkley for Best Print News story, for exposing Dr Jayant Patel, Bundaberg Director of Surgery.[9]
  • 2005 Sir Keith Murdoch Award, for the Patel story.[3]
  • 2003 Walkley for Best Print Feature, on Di Fingleton, jailed Chief Magistrate of Queensland.[10]
  • 1999 Walkley for Best Investigative Writing (with Paul Whittaker) for exposing the "Net Bet affair".[2][11]
  • In 2012 he received an Honorary Doctorate of Journalism from John Henningham's Jschool School of Journalism in Brisbane.[12]

Thomas has also won many other journalism awards in Queensland and Hong Kong.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Informal portrait of 0219178 Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr) Hedley Robert Thomas". National Library of Australia. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Paula Doneman; Amanda Watt (25 October 2002). "Stalker shoots at journo". The Courier-Mail. p. 1. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Hedley Thomas". The Australian. Archived from the original on 3 September 2012. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "Sick to death". Allen and Unwin. Retrieved 25 October 2013. 
  5. ^ Knott, Matthew. "Journalists & Editors, no. 6: Hedley Thomas". Crikey.com.au. Retrieved 16 July 2014. 
  6. ^ "Past Gold Walkley award winners". sbs.com.au. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "2012 Queensland Clarion Awards". clarions.org. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  8. ^ "2007 Walkley Awards winners announced". Media Spy. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  9. ^ "Walkley awards past winners". The Walkley Foundation. Retrieved 19 September 2012. 
  10. ^ "Walkley awards past winners". The Walkley Foundation. Retrieved 19 September 2012. 
  11. ^ Kirkpatrick, Rod (2000). "News media chronicle, July 1999 to June 2000" (PDF). Australian Studies in Journalism. 9: 168. Retrieved 3 September 2012. 
  12. ^ "Fairfax in talks". The Australian. 22 October 2012.