Heisler, Alberta

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Heisler
Village
Village of Heisler
Heisler is located in Alberta
Heisler
Heisler
Coordinates: 52°40′13″N 112°13′13″W / 52.67028°N 112.22028°W / 52.67028; -112.22028Coordinates: 52°40′13″N 112°13′13″W / 52.67028°N 112.22028°W / 52.67028; -112.22028
Country  Canada
Province  Alberta
Region Central Alberta
Census Division No. 7
Municipal district Flagstaff County
Incorporated[1]  
 • Village July 27, 1920
 • Dissolution March 29, 1938
 • Village January 1, 1961
Government[2]
 • Mayor Dennis Steil (deputy)
 • Governing body Heisler Village Council
Area (2016)[3]
 • Land 0.64 km2 (0.25 sq mi)
Elevation 725 m (2,379 ft)
Population (2016)[3]
 • Total 160
 • Density 250.8/km2 (650/sq mi)
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
Highways 855
Website Official website

Heisler is a village in central Alberta, Canada. It is located 23 km south of Daysland and 20 km north of Forestburg.

The community has the name of Martin Heisler, the original owner of the land.[4]

Demographics[edit]

In the 2016 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Village of Heisler recorded a population of 160 living in 74 of its 87 total private dwellings, a 6% change from its 2011 population of 151. With a land area of 0.64 km2 (0.25 sq mi), it had a population density of 250.0/km2 (647.5/sq mi) in 2016.[3]

In the 2011 Census, the Village of Heisler had a population of 151 living in 71 of its 81 total dwellings, a -1.3% change from its 2006 population of 153. With a land area of 0.76 km2 (0.29 sq mi), it had a population density of 198.7/km2 (514.6/sq mi) in 2011.[5]

The population of the Village of Heisler according to its 2010 municipal census is 150.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Location and History Profile: Village of Heisler" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 21, 2016. p. 351. Retrieved October 23, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. September 22, 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017. 
  4. ^ Place-names of Alberta. Ottawa: Geographic Board of Canada. 1928. p. 64. 
  5. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2012. 
  6. ^ "2010 Official Population List" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. September 15, 2010. Retrieved January 19, 2011. 

External links[edit]