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Hayes Theater

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Hayes Theater
Helen Hayes Theatre
Little Theatre
New York Times Hall
The Hayes Theater in 2022
The theater seen in 2022
Address240 West 44th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′28″N 73°59′16″W / 40.7579°N 73.9878°W / 40.7579; -73.9878Coordinates: 40°45′28″N 73°59′16″W / 40.7579°N 73.9878°W / 40.7579; -73.9878
OwnerSecond Stage Theater
TypeBroadway
Capacity597
Construction
OpenedMarch 12, 1912
Years active1912–1941, 1963–1965, 1974–present
ArchitectHarry Creighton Ingalls
DesignatedNovember 17, 1987[1]
Reference no.1346[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedNovember 17, 1987[2]
Reference no.1347[2]
Designated entityLobby (foyer and emergency-exit space), auditorium interior

The Hayes Theater (formerly the Little Theatre, New York Times Hall, Winthrop Ames Theatre, and Helen Hayes Theatre) is a Broadway theater at 240 West 44th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Named for actress Helen Hayes, the venue is operated by Second Stage Theater. It is the smallest Broadway theater, with 597 seats across two levels. The theater was constructed in 1912 for impresario Winthrop Ames and designed by Ingalls & Hoffman in a neo-Georgian style. The original single-level, 299-seat configuration was modified in 1920, when Herbert J. Krapp added a balcony. The theater has served as a legitimate playhouse, a conference hall, and a broadcasting studio throughout its history.

The facade and parts of the theater's interior are New York City landmarks. The facade is made largely of red brick. The main entrance is through an arch on the eastern portion of the ground-floor; the rest of the ground floor is taken up by emergency exits, shielded by marquee. The main entrance connects to a box-office lobby, as well as a foyer with a vaulted ceiling and staircases. The auditorium is decorated with ornamental plasterwork, with Adam-style design elements; it has a sloped orchestra level, one balcony level, and a flat ceiling. There are other spaces throughout the theater, including lounges.

Ames had intended for the Little Theatre to show new plays, but lack of profits led him to expand the theater within a decade of its opening. Ames leased the theater to Oliver Morosco in 1919 and to John Golden in 1922. The New York Times bought the theater in 1931 with plans to raze it, but the Little continued hosting plays until 1941, when it was converted into a conference hall. The theater became an ABC broadcasting studio in 1951. The Little briefly hosted legitimate shows from 1963 to 1965, when it became a Westinghouse studio, taping shows such as the Merv Griffin Show. The Little again became a legitimate theater in 1977, and it was then sold to Martin Markinson and Donald Tick, who renamed the theater for Helen Hayes in 1983. Second Stage bought the theater in 2015 and reopened it in 2018, removing Hayes's first name from the theater.

Site[edit]

The Hayes Theater is at 240 West 44th Street, on the south sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Seventh Avenue, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[3][4] The land lot is nearly rectangular, with an indentation on the western end. The lot covers 7,225 square feet (671.2 m2), with a frontage of 75 feet (23 m) on 44th Street and a depth of 100.42 feet (31 m).[4]

The Hayes Theater shares the city block with St. James Theatre to the west, Sardi's restaurant and 1501 Broadway to the east, and 255 West 43rd Street and 229 West 43rd Street to the south. Across 44th Street are the Row NYC Hotel to the northwest, the Majestic and Broadhurst theaters to the north, and the Shubert Theatre and One Astor Plaza to the northeast. Other nearby structures include the John Golden, Bernard B. Jacobs, Gerald Schoenfeld, and Booth theaters to the north, as well as the former Hotel Carter, American Airlines Theatre, and Lyric Theatre to the south.[4] Prior to the theater's development, the site was part of the Astor family estate and contained several brownstone townhouses.[5]

Design[edit]

The Hayes Theater was designed by Ingalls & Hoffman for impresario Winthrop Ames using elements of the neo-Federal,[6][7] colonial,[7] and Georgian Revival styles.[8][9] It was originally constructed in 1912 as the Little Theatre.[3][6][10] In its original configuration, the Little's auditorium had just one level of seating. The layout was meant to give theater patrons the feeling that they were Ames's "guests for the nonce, in an old colonial house behind a garden wall, left behind in the march of progress, the front untouched and the interior remodeled by an amateur of the stage".[7][11] The current two-level layout was completed in 1920 and designed by Herbert J. Krapp, who went on to become a prolific Broadway theater architect.[6][12] The Hayes is operated by Second Stage Theater, a nonprofit theater company, as of 2018.[13]

Facade[edit]

Main entrance

The facade consists of red brick with Flemish bond, as well as limestone trim.[14][11] It is asymmetrically arranged, with the theater's main entrance to the far east (left) side of the ground floor.[14][15] A stone water table runs along the bottom of the ground-floor facade.[14] The rest of the facade was designed with sash windows containing white frames.[11]

The entrance doorway is a brick arch, which contains impost blocks on either side, as well as a console-shaped keystone at the top. Within this arch are a set of wooden double doors, which are flanked by Ionic-style columns and by sidelights containing lozenge and oval patterns. The brick arch is flanked on either side by paired columns with Corinthian-style capitals. There are electronic signs between each column pair; these rest on pedestals and are topped by urns and volutes. A band course runs above the arch, behind the paired columns. Above this is a stone plaque with inscribed letters reading "The Little Theatre MCMXII", as well as a pair of dancing figures in low relief. The paired columns support a stone architrave above the doors.[14]

To the west (right) of the entrance are four double doors, which provide an emergency exit from the lobby. This section of the facade formerly contained three narrow windows.[14] A double door, designed to resemble a stable door, was originally placed between two of these windows.[7][14] Carriage lamps were also mounted on the facade to give the impression that the theater was formerly a residence. Above the ground floor, the theater building has a setback, which was formerly decorated with potted plants.[7]

The second and third stories each contain six sash windows flanked by shutters.[8][16] The second-story window panes are arranged in an eight-over-twelve format; above them are splayed stone lintels, containing keystones with bead motifs and brackets. There are curved metal balconies in front of the four westernmost windows, while the two easternmost windows share a terrace over the main entrance. The third-story window panes are arranged in an eight-over-eight format with paneled keystones. A cornice with modillions runs above the third story. A balustrade formerly ran above the cornice but has since been removed.[16]

Interior[edit]

Lobbies[edit]

The main entrance leads to a box office, as well as a lobby with two sections.[17] The box office was originally paneled in ivory-colored wood. A passage to the stage is through a door to the west of the box office.[11] The lobby, to the west (right) of the box office, is designed with reliefs in the Adam style.[18] The main section of the lobby is a rectangular foyer, accessed through a doorway on the box office's right wall.[11][19] To the north of the foyer is a secondary area, one step below the foyer, which leads to the four emergency-exit doors on 44th Street.[18]

The western end of the lobby foyer contains an archway to the basement;[18] this was originally a wall with a fireplace.[20][21] The foyer's north wall contains Ionic-style columns, behind which is the emergency-exit area. The south wall contains doors to the auditorium, as well as Ionic-style pilasters that are directly across from the north-wall columns. There are staircases on the western and eastern ends of the foyer's north wall, which lead up to the balcony; the eastern staircase has a metal railing with lyres. An architrave, with a frieze depicting urns and lyres, runs along the top of the foyer walls.[18] The foyer contains a barrel-vaulted ceiling above the architrave,[20] with a chandelier suspended from an Adam-style medallion. The emergency-exit area's ceiling contains Adam-style panels, and the architrave panels above the exit doors are also designed in the Adam style.[18]

Auditorium[edit]

The Hayes Theater is the smallest Broadway venue, with 597 seats.[22][23] The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, and a stage behind the proscenium arch. The space is designed with plaster decorations in relief.[24] Originally, the Little Theatre had only 299 seats on a single level, the orchestra.[7][5][6] In the original configuration, there were only 15 rows of seats.[15] One of the front seats was designed specifically to accommodate businessman J. P. Morgan.[25] The rear of the auditorium did initially have a balcony-level terrace, but it was only 4 to 5 feet (1.2 to 1.5 m) wide and had no seats.[26]

The rear or southern end of the orchestra contains two paneled-wood doors from the foyer.[27] The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward the stage,[28][29] similar to in the original layout of the theater.[21] The side walls of the auditorium were originally covered in wooden panels,[9][29] but these were replaced with plasterwork panels when Krapp renovated the theater. The front sections of the side walls are angled toward the proscenium, with emergency-exit doors at orchestra level.[28] As of 2018, the side walls contain a pixelated blue mural that resembles the walls' former tapestries.[25][30]

The rear of the balcony contains a promenade, accessed on either end by the stairways in the foyer.[18] Near the front of the balcony level, both of the side walls contain two arched openings with pilasters on either side, as well as fan-shaped lunettes above. One of these is an emergency exit, while the other is a window opening;[24] these windows allowed Ames to observe the auditorium from his office.[29] The side walls have lighting sconces as well.[31] The underside of the balcony is made of plaster paneling. The front railing of the balcony has Adam-style plasterwork paneling with pilasters, urns, and molded bands, with light boxes mounted in front.[27] The railing curves onto the side walls, giving the impression of box seats.[18]

At the front of the auditorium is the proscenium, which contains a flat-arched opening flanked by angled bands.[24][29] Behind the proscenium, there was originally a revolving stage,[15][32][26] as well as three sets of curtains.[32] A cornice runs above the proscenium and the side and rear walls, with rosettes, swags, and cartouches. The ceiling is flat but is decorated in ornate plasterwork, dating to Ingalls and Hoffman's design.[24] The entire ceiling is surrounded by a band of rosette, swag, and urn motifs. The center of the ceiling contains a molded oval panel; the perimeter of the oval contains reliefs of cherubs and female figures, connected by swags. The corners of the oval contain triangular panels; those in the rear depict female figures with mirrors, while those in the front depict Roman masks.[28] There are fan-shaped medallions inside the oval, from which hang chandeliers.[27]

Other interior spaces[edit]

On the west wall of the foyer, the door to the left of the fireplace led to a ladies' room. It was painted like the box office and had a large mirror, dressing table, chaise longue, and mahogany side chairs with armure coverings in a rose color.[11] To the right, stairs descended to a tea room that was similar in design to a residential living room.[7][11] The tea room had old-English oak furnishings, white-paneled walls, blue-green curtains, and a gray carpet.[11] The tea room was used not only to serve drinks during intermission but also as a cloak room.[33] There were coat racks that could be pushed behind a Spanish-leather screen during performances. Also in the basement was a men's smoking room with oak wainscoting, yellowish-brown walls with benches, a cream-colored ceiling, and a red tile floor.[29]

The second and third floors were equipped with offices.[29] These included Winthrop Ames's offices, which were directly above the auditorium.[21][29] Backstage, elevators and stairs led from the stage to the dressing rooms.[29] There was also a green room from which the dressing rooms were accessed.[26][34] Though green rooms were falling out of favor by the time the Little Theatre was constructed, one was included on Ames's insistence. The room was decorated with green walls, a long seat, and mirrors.[34]

History[edit]

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[35] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[36][37] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Little Theatre.[38] Winthrop Ames, a member of a wealthy publishing family, did not enter the theatrical industry until 1905, when he was 34 years old.[39][40] After being involved in the development of two large venues, Boston's Castle Square Theatre and New York City's New Theatre, Ames decided to focus on erecting smaller venues during the Little Theatre Movement.[39] The New Theatre had failed quickly, as Ames's New Theatre Company only occupied the theater from 1909 to 1911. Ames saw the New as too large and too far away from Times Square.[41]

Initial Broadway run[edit]

Development and early years[edit]

The Little Theatre opened with John Galsworthy's play The Pigeon (1912).

In September 1911, Ames announced his intention to build a 300-seat playhouse around Times Square.[41] Two months later, Ingalls and Hoffman filed plans with the New York City Department of Buildings for the Little Theatre, a 299-seat theater at 238–244 West 44th Street, to cost $100,000.[42][43] The 299-seat capacity exempted Ames from New York City Fire Department regulations, wherein theaters with at least 300 seats required emergency-exit alleys on either side.[5] Ames also formed a corporation to operate the theater. The corporation issued stock, with Ames being the sole stockholder.[44]

Ames released further details about the theater in December 1911. The Little was to be a single-level auditorium without balconies or boxes, and it was to host "plays of wide appeal" and "novelties".[45][46] Ames wanted the theater to host "the clever, the unusual drama that has a chance of becoming a library classic".[47] Some critics said the site was too far from Times Square, but Ames countered that the Belasco Theatre, one block east, was the same distance from Times Square.[48] Another criticism was that Ames's theater was elitist because all seats had equally good views of the stage, with one ticket price for all seats.[5] Construction progressed quickly, with over 150 workers being employed at one point.[49]

The Little opened on March 12, 1912, with John Galsworthy's play The Pigeon.[50][51] This was followed by a special matinee with Charles Rann Kennedy's The Terrible Meek and Ma Tcheu-Yuen's The Flower of the Palace of Han.[48] The Little's productions of the 1912–1913 season included a revival of The Affairs of Anatol,[52][53][54] as well as the original productions Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs[55][56] and Rutherford and Son.[57][58] Ames financed several of the initial shows at the theater,[59] including Prunella[60][61] and The Philanderer in 1913.[60][62] The following year, the theater hosted A Pair of Silk Stockings, which was the Little's first major hit with 223 performances.[60][63] In addition, in 1914, Ames started hiring musicians to play "new, original, unpublished American music" during intermission.[64] At the end of that year, Ames's physician ordered him to take a twelve-month hiatus from theatrical productions.[48] The Little Theater hosted no productions during the 1915–1916 theatrical season,[65] as Ames did not return to producing until August 1916.[66][67]

Expansion and Morosco/Golden operation[edit]

The facade as seen in 1913

By early 1915, the small capacity of the Little had restricted Ames's ability to profit from the venue,[50] even though Ames charged a relatively affordable $2.50 per seat (equivalent to $66.97 in 2021).[5][48] That March, The New York Times reported that Ames was planning to increase the capacity to 1,000 seats by adding a balcony, enlarging the auditorium, and replacing the stage.[59][68] Two months later, Ames leased the dwelling at 244 West 44th Street for the possible enlargement of the theater.[69] The New-York Tribune lamented that the city would "lose its gem among playhouses" with the planned enlargement.[70] A Billboard magazine article that July indicated that the theater would receive a 200-seat balcony, increasing the capacity only to 500 seats.[71] Ames hired Herbert J. Krapp in 1917 to remodel the theater with a balcony.[12][72] Krapp kept the box office, the lobby, and the auditorium ceiling in their original condition. He removed the wainscoting and wall coverings, since these did not conform to New York City building regulations for larger venues, and added Adam-style decorations in their place.[73]

A disagreement with the New York City Department of Buildings delayed the renovation by three years.[74] In 1918, Rachel Crothers's play A Little Journey opened at the Little,[21][75] running for 252 performances.[76][77] The plans for the theater's renovation were approved in June 1919,[74][78] and Ames leased the theater to Oliver Morosco the same month.[78][79] The same year, Morosco presented Please Get Married, featuring Ernest Truex and Edith Taliaferro.[80][81] When the theater's expansion was completed in early 1920,[48] Morosco hosted two "experimental dramas": Rachel Barton Butler's Mama's Affair and Eugene O'Neill's Beyond the Horizon.[82] John Golden's production of Frank Craven's The First Year, starring Craven and Roberta Arnold, opened at the Little in October 1920;[83] that play ran for nearly two years.[84][85][a]

In August 1922, Golden acquired Morosco's stake in the lease, partnering with L. Lawrence Weber and F. Ray Comstock.[89][90][b] By that year, Ames had incurred a net deficit of $504,372 from the theater's operation,[44][91] and the corporation operating the theater was dissolved.[44] Craven's Spite Corner opened in September 1922[92][93] and stayed at the Little for three months.[84][94] Two plays by Guy Bolton were staged at the Little in 1923: Polly Preferred with Genevieve Tobin and Chicken Feed with Roberta Arnold.[48][95] The latter was transferred to another theater when Golden sought to transfer the revue Little Jessie James to the Little.[96] The comedy Pigs opened at the Little in September 1924[97] and ran for 347 performances.[84][98] This was followed in 1926 by two shows with over a hundred performances:[99] Marc Connelly's The Wisdom Tooth[95][100] and Gladys Buchanan Unger's Two Girls Wanted.[95][101] Another hit was a transfer of the Grand Street Follies in 1927.[84][102] Additionally, Rachel Crothers's Let Us Be Gay opened in 1929 with Francine Larrimore and Warren William,[103][104] running for 353 performances.[105]

Late 1920s and 1930s[edit]

View of upper-story windows

Ames announced his retirement from producing in October 1929, but he said he would continue to control the Little Theatre, with Golden, Weber, and Comstock operating the venue.[106] Two months later, the Little Theatre was leased to Chauncey W. Keim of the Harkem Holding Corporation for ten years.[107] Harkem gave up its lease in June 1930, citing an unprofitable season.[108][109] Later that year, the Little hosted Mr. Samuel with Edward G. Robinson,[110][111] which was Ames's last show at the theater.[96] This was followed in 1931 by Elmer Rice's The Left Bank.[110][112] Vincent Astor sold the theater to The New York Times Company that November.[113][114][115] According to the Times, the theater would "protect the light and air" of the Times annex at 229 West 43rd Street, as well as provide an additional exit from the annex.[113] Variety magazine reported that the theater would be demolished to make way for the annex exit.[115] Due to Depression-era budget cuts,[116] the Times decided to keep the theater operating for at least a year.[117][118] Ames's lease on the Little expired in May 1932.[119]

The New York Times Company leased the theater to Little Theatre Operating Company for one year starting in September 1932.[118][119][120] The new operator planned to host "contemporary light comedies".[117] During this period, the Little hosted many relatively short-lived productions,[22][23][121] including "a spate of plays with 'Honeymoon' in their titles".[122] The theater passed to the Frankwyn Corporation, operated by Arch Selwyn and H. B. Franklin. In December 1934, Allen Robbins and Jacob Weiser assumed operation of the theater.[123] The next February, the theater was leased to CBS as a broadcast studio.[124][125] At the time, producer Brock Pemberton had offices on the upper stories; he was allowed to stay.[125] CBS reduced the capacity to 475 seats and occupied the theater for a year and a half. The network, seeking a larger accommodation, ultimately leased the Manhattan (now Ed Sullivan) Theater in August 1936, vacating the Little Theatre by the end of the next month.[126]

The playwright Anne Nichols leased the theater for legitimate productions in September 1936.[127] Nichols moved her play Pre-Honeymoon there,[128][129] and the venue became Anne Nichols' Little Theatre.[128] During 1936 and 1937, the theater hosted productions such as Promise with Cedric Hardwicke,[130][131] Sun Kissed with Jean Adair and Charles Coburn,[132][133] and Abie's Irish Rose.[132][134] The Little Theatre's original name was restored when Cornelia Otis Skinner's solo show Edna His Wife opened in December 1937.[128] By March 1939, the Times was again contemplating destroying the Little Theatre.[135][136] The theatrical firm of Bonfils and Somnes were leasing the theater at the time.[136][137] The Shubert family (which operated several nearby theaters) and the operators of the neighboring Astor Hotel objected that the proposed demolition would lower their property values.[135] The Times relented that July, delaying the proposed demolition by offering three-year leases in the theater building.[138] In 1940, the Little hosted the revue Reunion in New York, featuring the American Viennese Group.[139][140]

Intermittent theatrical use[edit]

1940s and 1950s[edit]

Plaque above the entrance

The theater became a conference center named the New York Times Hall in December 1941.[141][c] The first event at the conference hall was a speech by mayor Fiorello La Guardia about air-raid preparations at schools.[143][144] Under the Times's ownership, the theater sometimes hosted concerts and discussions.[142] The events included "victory garden lectures",[145] a book conference for children,[146] an instrumental concert,[147] and recitals from figures such as basso Emanuel List[148] and dancer Lotte Goslar.[149] The hall's steep rake was removed, and the pipes throughout the theater building were replaced. In August 1944, the New York Times Company filed plans for a 11-story building on the site of the Little Theatre, but these plans were not executed.[150]

The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) leased the theater as a television studio by July 1951.[151][152][d] ABC renovated the theater for The Frances Langford/Don Ameche Show, a variety show featuring Frances Langford and Don Ameche. The stage apron was extended into the orchestra, and lighting, control rooms, and camera arrangements were modified.[152][153] The Little Theatre was also used for ABC radio broadcasts.[154] In 1953, executives of the Ern Westmore Show arranged to broadcast from the Little for six and a half years.[155] Dick Clark's The Dick Clark Show also started broadcasting from the Little Theatre in February 1958,[156] remaining there through September 1960.[157] During this time, ABC also broadcast the daytime show Who Do You Trust? with Johnny Carson from the theater.[158]

1960s and 1970s[edit]

In June 1962, Roger Euster purchased the Little Theatre through his company Little Theatre Inc.,[159][160] beating out several other bidders.[161] The acquisition cost $850,000, part of which the company financed through a stock offering of $294,000.[162] Euster planned to host daily "marathon presentations", with various legitimate plays, impersonations, children's shows, and classic shows running for 17 hours a day.[161][163] The first new legitimate show at the theater was Tambourines of Glory,[128] a Black revue that opened in November 1963[164][165] and closed after a week.[166] Euster opened a bar in the Little's basement and offered free alcoholic beverages to patrons,[167][168] but the New York City license commissioner quickly halted the practice because the theater had no liquor license.[169] At the end of the year, the Paul Taylor Dance Company performed at the Little.[122][170] Subsequently, in early 1964, the Habima Theatre of Israel performed three shows at the Little: The Dybbuk, Children of the Shadows, and Each Had Six Wings.[171][172]

Euster and Leonard Tow sold the theater in June 1964 to Leonard B. Moore and Richard S. Smith.[173] The theater was renamed the Winthrop Ames Theatre that September,[174][175] when Frank D. Gilroy's play The Subject Was Roses transferred there.[128][176] According to one media source, Moore "did not want the theater to suffer under the handicap of being called Little any longer".[175] The Subject Was Roses relocated in March 1965,[177][178] and the theater's name reverted to the Little.[128] Westinghouse Broadcasting paid the producers of The Subject Was Roses to relocate,[178][179] as it was seeking to lease the theater as a broadcast studio.[180][181]

At first, Westinghouse taped the syndicated Merv Griffin Show at the Little.[180][179] By 1969, Merv Griffin moved to another network[182] and the theater was being used for taping The David Frost Show.[183] The 1969–70 season of the game show Beat the Clock, hosted by Jack Narz, was also taped there.[184] A show by psychologist Joyce Brothers was also hosted at the Little Theatre.[185] Amid a general decline in the Times Square neighborhood, the Little Theatre became vacant by mid-1972.[186] The venue stood vacant for six months in 1973, reopening in September as a venue for gay pornographic films.[185] Moore, who claimed he did not know that his tenants were pornographic film exhibitors, quickly halted the film screenings after other theatrical owners protested.[187] In May 1974, Westinghouse Broadcasting acquired the Little Theatre from Moore's company, after Moore defaulted on a mortgage that had been placed on the theater building.[188]

Broadway revival[edit]

1974 to 1989[edit]

Side view of entrance

The Little Theatre returned to legitimate productions a second time in 1974, when Ray Aranha's My Sister, My Sister opened there.[189][190] Because of the Little's small size, the Actors' Equity Association gave the theater a special designation, which exempted the theater from some of Actors' Equity's strict rules regarding profits.[142] This was followed in 1975 by the short-lived musical Man on the Moon[191] and the play Lamppost Reunion,[192][193] as well as in 1976 by a six-month run of The Runner Stumbles.[194][195] The next hit at the theater was Albert Innaurato's play Gemini, which transferred from off Broadway in 1977[196][197] and ran for 1,819 performances over the next four years.[198][197][e] Westinghouse subsequently sold the theater, but sources dissent on when the sale occurred. According to Ken Bloom and The New York Times, Martin Markinson and Donald Tick bought the theater from Westinghouse in 1979 for $800,000.[199][200] However, media sources from March 1980 said that the theater had been sold to Ashton Springer[201][202][203] for $800,000.[201] Springer's group, known as the Little Theater Group, planned to spend $400,000 to renovate the theater.[203] The firm Adcadesign subsequently renovated the theater in 1981.[196]

In the early 1980s, the Little saw three short runs: Ned and Jack in 1981, as well as The Curse of an Aching Heart and Solomon's Child in 1982.[204] The theater's next hit came in June 1982 when Harvey Fierstein's play Torch Song Trilogy opened;[189][205] it ran for three years.[206] The Little Theatre was renamed in July 1983 for actress Helen Hayes, who was then 82 years old. Hayes had outlived her previous namesake theater on 46th Street, which had been demolished to make way for the New York Marriott Marquis hotel.[207][208] Ed Koch, then the mayor of New York City, said that Hayes wanted her name on "a small theater" when asked whether she wanted the hotel's new 1,500-seat theater (later the Marquis Theatre) renamed in her honor.[207] After Torch Song Trilogy ended, the Hayes hosted the musical The News, which flopped after four performances in 1985.[209][210] The next year, the Hayes staged the comedy Corpse!,[211][212] the mime show Mummenschanz: "The New Show",[213] and the revue Oh, Coward!.[214][215]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) started to consider protecting the Hayes as a landmark in 1982,[216] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[217] The LPC designated the Hayes's facade and part of the interior as landmarks on November 17, 1987.[218] That month, the owners announced that they would auction off the theater at a starting price of $5 million.[200][219] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the landmark designations in March 1988.[220] The theater was auctioned the same month; both Jujamcyn Theaters and the Nederlander Organization attended the auction, but there were no bidders.[221] Late in the decade, the Hayes hosted Larry Shue's The Nerd in 1987[222][223][224] and the two-act musical Romance/Romance in 1988.[222][225][226] This was followed in 1989 by Mandy Patinkin's Dress Casual[227][228] and Artist Descending a Staircase.[229][230]

1990 to 2007[edit]

Exterior of the theater as seen in 2007

Premiering at the Helen Hayes Theatre in 1990 were a short run of Estelle Parsons's solo show Miss Margarida's Way,[231][232] as well as a year-long run of the off-Broadway hit Prelude to a Kiss.[233][234] The Hayes was remodeled in 1992,[235] and the musical revue The High Rollers Social and Pleasure Club[236][237] and the musical 3 From Brooklyn were staged the same year.[238][239] Lynn Redgrave performed her solo show Shakespeare For My Father in 1993,[240][241] followed the next year by Joan Rivers in Sally Marr...and Her Escorts[242][243] and a stunt show by The Flying Karamazov Brothers.[244][245] Rob Becker's monologue Defending the Caveman opened at the Hayes in 1995 and ran for nearly two years.[246][247] This was followed in 1997 by Alfred Uhry's play The Last Night of Ballyhoo,[222] which had 577 performances before closing.[248][249] The Hayes's productions at the end of the 1990s included Getting and Spending in 1998,[250][251] as well as Band in Berlin,[252][253] Night Must Fall,[254] and Epic Proportions in 1999.[255][256]

The revue Dirty Blonde opened in 2000 and was a hit.[257][258] This was followed by Hershey Felder's solo musical tribute George Gershwin Alone and the musical By Jeeves in 2001, as well as the black comedy The Smell of the Kill in 2002.[22][259] Frank Gorshin performed solo in Say Goodnight Gracie for 364 performances starting in 2002.[260][261] William Gibson's play Golda's Balcony opened the next year, featuring Tovah Feldshuh, and ran for 493 performances.[262][263] During 2005, Jackie Mason hosted his comedy Freshly Squeezed at the Hayes,[264][265] and the Latino comedy revue Latinologues was also presented.[266][267] The theater's productions in 2006 included Bridge and Tunnel, Kiki & Herb: Alive on Broadway, and Jay Johnson: The Two and Only.[22][259] The musical Xanadu premiered at the Hayes in 2007 and ran there for 512 performances.[268][269] While Tick died the same year, his family still co-owned the theater with Markinson.[259][270]

Second Stage[edit]

Sale and continuing productions[edit]

In July 2008, Markinson and the Tick family indicated their intention to sell the Hayes to Second Stage Theater, which planned to take over the theater in 2010. Second Stage was raising $35 million for both the acquisition and a renovation.[270][271] In the meantime, Slava's Snowshow had a limited run at the Hayes during the 2008–2009 winter season.[272][273] The 39 Steps moved to the Hayes in 2009 and ran for a year before relocating off-Broadway.[274][275] In 2010, Second Stage launched a $45 million capital campaign, with commitments for half that amount, and the theater company was planning to sell the theater's naming rights for $15 million. Pfeiffer Partners had completed plans for a renovation of the theater's interior.[276] The same year, the Hayes staged the play Next Fall,[277][278] as well as Colin Quinn's one-man show Long Story Short,[279][280] the latter of which was recorded at the theater as an HBO special.[281] The popular rock musical Rock of Ages transferred to the Hayes in 2011,[282] running there for nearly four years.[283][284] Rock of Ages achieved the box office record for the Helen Hayes Theatre, grossing $744,667 over nine performances for the week ending December 30, 2012.[285]

After Second Stage finally raised enough money to buy the theater, Tick's family and Markinson requested that the sale be delayed until Rock of Ages closed.[286] In February 2015, Second Stage sued the Hayes's owners for allegedly reneging on the 2008 sale agreement.[286][287] Second Stage alleged that Tick's family and Markinson were trying to invalidate the sale by rushing the closing process.[286] While the sale was supposed to have been finalized on February 17, Second Stage did not have enough money at that time to cover the $25 million purchase price.[288] By then, the costs of acquiring and renovating the theater had increased to $58 million from $35 million.[286][288] In response, Markinson said he would sell the theater at the agreed price of $24.7 million if Second Stage could get the money.[289] The dispute was resolved in April 2015, when the sale of the Hayes to Second Stage was finalized.[290][291] With the sale, Second Stage became one of four nonprofit theater companies to own and operate Broadway theaters.[288][291][f] Before a planned renovation, the Hayes hosted short runs of the off-Broadway hit Dames at Sea in 2015[294][295] and then The Humans in 2016.[296][297]

Renovation and reopening[edit]

Seen in 2021

The Humans relocated to another theater in July 2016 to make way for Second Stage's renovation.[297] Second Stage ultimately spent $64 million, including $28 million for the actual purchase, $22 million for renovation, and $14 million for programming.[298] Jordan Roth of Jujamcyn Theaters, which operated the neighboring St. James Theatre, approached Second Stage about the possibility of simultaneously renovating both theaters.[299] Second Stage sold the alley between the theaters to Jujamcyn,[300][301] which helped Second Stage fund the cost of renovating the Hayes.[298] The Rockwell Group was hired as the architect.[25][30] The project added an elevator, restrooms, and mechanical systems. In addition, the dressing rooms were relocated from the basement to the third floor.[30][302]

Second Stage planned to host works by living American playwrights, particularly from female and minority writers, at the Hayes Theater.[303][304] This was a contrast to other Broadway theaters, which often hosted revivals by dead playwrights as well as foreign works.[25] Second Stage's first production at the Hayes was Kenneth Lonergan's Lobby Hero, which opened in March 2018.[305][306] This was followed the same year by Young Jean Lee's Straight White Men[307][308] and a revival of Torch Song Trilogy.[206][309] Subsequently, in 2019, the Hayes hosted Heidi Schreck's What the Constitution Means to Me[310][311] and Tracy Letts's Linda Vista.[312][313] After Linda Vista, the Hayes was to present two plays in early 2020: Bess Wohl's Grand Horizons and a revival of Richard Greenberg's 2002 play Take Me Out.[314] Grand Horizons was staged from January to March 2020.[315][316]

The theater went dark when all Broadway theaters were shut down on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic;[317] as a result, previews of Take Me Out were delayed.[318] The Hayes reopened on November 3, 2021, with previews of Clyde's by Lynn Nottage.[319] Take Me Out opened in April 2022,[320][321] two years after it was first supposed to premiere.[322] This will be followed by Matthew Spangler's play The Kite Runner in July 2022[323][324] and Stephen Adly Guirgis's play Between Riverside and Crazy in late 2022.[325]

Notable productions[edit]

Little Theatre[edit]

Helen Hayes Theatre[edit]

Hayes Theater (Second Stage)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The production is variously cited as having run for 725,[86] 729,[87] or 760 performances.[88]
  2. ^ Contemporary sources reported that Golden wanted to rename the theater after himself, but it is unclear if this occurred.[89][90]
  3. ^ According to Ken Bloom, the New York Times Company took over the Little Theatre and renamed it in January 1942.[142] However, Variety magazine reported the takeover and name change the previous month.[141]
  4. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 147, and Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53., erroneously cite the ABC studio conversion as having taken place in 1959, but the studio lease is recorded in contemporary sources from 1951.
  5. ^ Sometimes cited as 1,788 performances[196]
  6. ^ The Manhattan Theatre Club, Roundabout Theatre Company, and Lincoln Center Theater are the other nonprofits.[292][293]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "240 West 44 Street, 10036". New York City Department of City Planning. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 12.
  6. ^ a b c d New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission; Dolkart, Andrew S.; Postal, Matthew A. (2009). Postal, Matthew A. (ed.). Guide to New York City Landmarks (4th ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-470-28963-1.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Stern, Robert A. M.; Gilmartin, Gregory; Massengale, John Montague (1983). New York 1900: Metropolitan Architecture and Urbanism, 1890–1915. New York: Rizzoli. p. 220. ISBN 0-8478-0511-5. OCLC 9829395.
  8. ^ a b Morrison, William (1999). Broadway Theatres: History and Architecture. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications. p. 77. ISBN 0-486-40244-4.
  9. ^ a b "New York's "Little Theater"". Outlook. March 23, 1912. p. 608. ProQuest 136621743.
  10. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 10.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h The New York Architect 1912, p. 232.
  12. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 13.
  13. ^ Cox, Gordon (February 13, 2018). "Nonprofit Second Stage Renovates Helen Hayes Theater on Broadway". Variety. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  15. ^ a b c "To Open Little Theatre: Winthrop Ames's New House Is Almost Completed". New-York Tribune. February 5, 1912. p. 4. ProQuest 574888147.
  16. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 16.
  17. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 16.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17.
  19. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 16–17.
  20. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 17; The New York Architect 1912, p. 232.
  21. ^ a b c d Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51.
  22. ^ a b c d The Broadway League (November 23, 2021). "Hayes Theater – New York, NY". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  23. ^ a b "Helen Hayes Theater (2018) New York, NY". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  24. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 17–18.
  25. ^ a b c d Paulson, Michael; Etheredge, George (February 5, 2018). "Broadway's Smallest Theater Is Reopening, This Time as a Nonprofit". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  26. ^ a b c "Winthrop Ames Little Theater Model of Its Kind: Auditorium of Quiet Elegance and Revolving Stage for Its Artistic Offerings Features". The Christian Science Monitor. July 17, 1917. p. 6. ProQuest 509905276.
  27. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 18–19.
  28. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 18.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h The New York Architect 1912, p. 233.
  30. ^ a b c Lentz, Linda C. (May 1, 2018). "The Hayes Theater by Rockwell Group". Architectural Record. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  31. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 19.
  32. ^ a b The New York Architect 1912, p. 234.
  33. ^ The New York Architect 1912, pp. 232–233.
  34. ^ a b Mears, Marjorie (January 22, 1933). "The Greenroom Soon Will Be Only a Memory in New York". New York Herald Tribune. p. E8. ProQuest 1114617513.
  35. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  36. ^ "Theater District –". New York Preservation Archive Project. Archived from the original on October 19, 2021. Retrieved October 12, 2021.
  37. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 2.
  38. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 4.
  39. ^ a b "Winthrop Ames, 66, Producer, is Dead; One of Important Forces for Many Years in American Theatre's Development". The New York Times. November 4, 1937. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  40. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 7–8.
  41. ^ a b "Ames's Playhouse in Times Square; Former Director of New Theatre May Build in 46th Street Smallest Theatre in City". The New York Times. September 9, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  42. ^ "Plans for Little Theatre: Playhouse to Be Erected by Winthrop Ames to Cost $100,000". New-York Tribune. November 19, 1911. p. B5. ProQuest 574837993.
  43. ^ "Transfers and Mortgages". The New York Times. November 19, 1911. p. XX3. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 97190709.
  44. ^ a b c "Winthrop Ames Loses Appeal on Income Tax: Court Holds He Cannot Deduct Little Theater Loss". New York Herald Tribune. May 1, 1934. p. 14. ProQuest 1114818251.
  45. ^ "Little Theatre Plans: Winthrop Ames Gives First Definite Announcement". New-York Tribune. December 20, 1911. p. 7. ProQuest 574855880.
  46. ^ "Ames Tells Plans for Little Theatre; Wishes to Present in Tiny House, Now Building, Plays of Wide Appeal and Novelty". The New York Times. December 20, 1911. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  47. ^ Bloom 2007, pp. 146–147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51.
  48. ^ a b c d e f "Beginning in 1912; An Anniversary Glance at the Record of Mr. Ames's Intimate House in 44th St". The New York Times. March 13, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  49. ^ "Little Theatre to Open". New-York Tribune. February 20, 1912. p. 7. ProQuest 574883396.
  50. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 13.
  51. ^ "The Little Theatre Jewel of Playhouse; Mr. Galsworthy's "The Pigeon," Perfectly Acted, Provides Most Delightful Opening Bill". The New York Times. March 12, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  52. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 147; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  53. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 14, 1912). "The Affairs of Anatol – Broadway Play – 1912 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Affairs of Anatol (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1912)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  54. ^ "Very Smart Are Anatol's Affairs; And Very Charmingly Done Are These Schnitzler Episodes at the Little Theatre". The New York Times. October 15, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  55. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 7, 1912). "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1912)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  56. ^ "Play Children at Little Theatre; With Marguerite Clark a Charming Snow White in the Well-Loved Fairy Tale". The New York Times. November 8, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  57. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 24, 1912). "Rutherford & Son – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Rutherford & Son (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1912)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  58. ^ "Rutherford and Son Has Grip and Power; A Faithful, Interesting, Though Very Gloomy Transcript from Life". The New York Times. December 25, 1912. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  59. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51.
  60. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  61. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1913). "Prunella – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "Prunella (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1913)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  62. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 30, 1913). "The Philanderer – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Philanderer (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1913)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  63. ^ The Broadway League (October 20, 1914). "A Pair of Silk Stockings – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "A Pair of Silk Stockings (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1914)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  64. ^ "American Music at Little Theatre". The New York Times. November 15, 1914. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  65. ^ "The Little Theatre Reopens With 'Hush'; Bright and Pleasant but Scanty Diversion Imported from England". The New York Times. October 2, 1916. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  66. ^ "Ames Resumes His Duties; Producer Will Again Manage the Booth and Little Theatres". The New York Times. August 4, 1916. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  67. ^ "News of Plays and Players: Winthrop Ames to Be Active--Candler Theatre Gets a New Name". New-York Tribune. August 4, 1916. p. 7. ProQuest 575604213.
  68. ^ "Samuel Bowles Stricken; Veteran Editor of The Springfield Republican Very Ill". The New York Times. March 11, 1915. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  69. ^ "Manhattan". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 95, no. 2460. May 8, 1915. p. 784 – via columbia.edu.
  70. ^ "Plays & Players: Thoughts on Close of Little Theatre Miss Victor's Fine Acting". New-York Tribune. May 9, 1915. p. B4. ProQuest 575372793.
  71. ^ "Little Theater Bigger". The Billboard. Vol. 27, no. 29. July 14, 1915. p. 14. ProQuest 1031489295.
  72. ^ "Manhattan". The Real Estate Record: Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide. Vol. 99, no. 2566. May 19, 1917. p. 706 – via columbia.edu.
  73. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, pp. 13–14.
  74. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1987, p. 14.
  75. ^ Corbin, John (December 27, 1918). "Drama". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  76. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  77. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 26, 1918). "A Little Journey – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "A Little Journey (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1918)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  78. ^ a b "Plays and Players". New-York Tribune. June 3, 1919. p. 13. ProQuest 576107440.
  79. ^ "Amusement Notes: Morosco Gets Little Theatre". Women's Wear. Vol. 18, no. 128. June 3, 1919. p. 10. ProQuest 1665939366.
  80. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 51; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  81. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 10, 1919). "Please Get Married – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Please Get Married (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1919)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  82. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 51–52; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 13–14.
  83. ^ "'The First Year' Is Joyous; Frank Craven's Comedy of Married Life a Hit at Little Theatre". The New York Times. October 21, 1920. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  84. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 52; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  85. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 1920). "The First Year – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The First Year (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  86. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  87. ^ "The First Year Closes". New York Clipper. June 21, 1922. Retrieved January 12, 2022 – via Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections.
  88. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 52.
  89. ^ a b "Exit the Little Theatre 'Twill Now Be the Golden". Daily News. August 13, 1922. p. 23. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  90. ^ a b "Golden Now Controls the Little Theater". The Billboard. Vol. 34, no. 33. August 19, 1922. p. 64. ProQuest 1031689494.
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  92. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 52; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 23.
  93. ^ "Two New Plays Monday; "Spite Corner" at Little Theatre; "On the Stairs" at the Playhouse". The New York Times. September 20, 1922. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  94. ^ The Broadway League (September 25, 1922). "Spite Corner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "Spite Corner (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1922)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  95. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  96. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 147.
  97. ^ "'Pigs' Warmly Greeted at Little Theatre; Golden's Production of Familiar Pattern Introduces Nydia Westman, Charming Young Actress". The New York Times. September 2, 1924. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  98. ^ The Broadway League (September 1, 1924). "Pigs – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "Pigs (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1924)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  99. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  100. ^ The Broadway League (February 15, 1926). "The Wisdom Tooth – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "The Wisdom Tooth (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1926)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  101. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 9, 1926). "Two Girls Wanted – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Two Girls Wanted (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1926)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  102. ^ The Broadway League (May 19, 1927). "Grand Street Follies [1927] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "Grand Street Follies [1927] (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  103. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  104. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (February 22, 1929). "The Play; Two Bites at a Cherry". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  105. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 19, 1929). "Let Us Be Gay – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Let Us Be Gay (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  106. ^ "Winthrop Ames Quits as Producer; Decides to Leave Field in Which He Has Been Prominent for Twenty-five Years". The New York Times. October 1, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  107. ^ "Leases Little Theatre; C. W. Keim Takes Winthrop Ames's Playhouse for Ten Years". The New York Times. December 17, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  108. ^ Allen, Kelcey (June 3, 1930). "Amusements: All Stellar Cast Gives Fine Account Of Itself In "Milestones," Revived By The Players". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 40, no. 108. p. 13. ProQuest 1727913148.
  109. ^ "Lessees Abandon the Little Theatre; Poor Business Blamed for Harkem Concern's Action--Lease Has Twelve Years to Run". The New York Times. June 3, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  110. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 147; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 52; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  111. ^ "Three New Plays to Be Shown Nov. 10; "Mr. Samuel," With Edward G. Robinson, "Queen at Home" and "Maid in France."". The New York Times. November 1, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  112. ^ The Broadway League (October 5, 1931). "The Left Bank – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
    "The Left Bank (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1931)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  113. ^ a b "Little Theatre Sold to the New York Times; Vincent Astor Disposes of a Property in 44th Street Adjoining the Times Annex". The New York Times. November 26, 1931. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  114. ^ "Little Theater In 44th Street Sold by Astor: Playhouse Erected in 1912 Acquired by Newspaper; Chapin Sells Residence". New York Herald Tribune. November 26, 1931. p. 46. ProQuest 1114142038.
  115. ^ a b "Legitimate: Little Theatre Sold". Variety. Vol. 104, no. 11. November 24, 1931. p. 10. ProQuest 1475778965.
  116. ^ "Legitimate: N. Y. Times Leases The Little Theatre; Ames Quits Show Biz". Variety. Vol. 108, no. 4. October 4, 1932. p. 43. ProQuest 1529373053.
  117. ^ a b Barnes, Howard (September 25, 1932). "The Playbill: Bad Manners Bourgeoises". New York Herald Tribune. p. F1. ProQuest 1114591970.
  118. ^ a b "Managers Shift to High Gear as Season Spurts". Daily News. September 25, 1932. p. 324. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  119. ^ a b "Little Theatre to Be Under New Auspices; Operating Company Bearing the House's Name Takes Lease -- Bookings Next Month". The New York Times. September 25, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  120. ^ Allen, Kelcey (October 5, 1932). "Amusements: Winthrop Ames Now In Retirement". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 45, no. 67. p. 23. ProQuest 1654338664.
  121. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 26–27.
  122. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53.
  123. ^ "Legitimate: Weiser and Robbins Take Little Theatre as Frankwyn Washes Up". Variety. Vol. 117, no. 2. December 25, 1934. p. 45. ProQuest 1475877025.
  124. ^ "Feature News: Little Theater May Get CBS Free Shows". The Billboard. Vol. 47, no. 7. February 16, 1935. p. 7. ProQuest 1032056507.
  125. ^ a b "Ben-Ami to Direct Play; Merivale in Repertory". Daily News. February 17, 1935. p. 241. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  126. ^ "Radio Theatre Leased; Columbia to Move Studio to the Manhattan From Little Theatre". The New York Times. August 19, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  127. ^ "Revival of 'Abie's Irish Rose', then Sequel, Plan". Daily News. September 13, 1936. p. 362. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  128. ^ a b c d e f Bloom 2007, p. 148; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  129. ^ "Theatre Notes". Daily News. September 25, 1936. p. 555. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  130. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 53; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
  131. ^ The Broadway League (December 30, 1936). "Promise – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  132. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 14.
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  195. ^ "'Texas Trilogy' Will End Oct. 31; 'Runner Stumbles' Closes Oct. 30". The New York Times. October 23, 1976. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  210. ^ "'The News' Closes". The New York Times. November 12, 1985. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  215. ^ "'Oh Coward!' to Close". The New York Times. December 31, 1986. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  224. ^ "'The Nerd' to Close Sunday". The New York Times. April 7, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  226. ^ "'Romance' Closes". The New York Times. January 20, 1989. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  230. ^ Rich, Frank (December 1, 1989). "Review/Theater; Art Imitates Art in a Stoppard Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  232. ^ "'Miss Margarida' Closing". The New York Times. February 24, 1990. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  234. ^ "'Prelude to a Kiss' Closes". The New York Times. May 20, 1991. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  235. ^ "Fast Facts". Newsday. April 3, 1992. p. 13. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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    "The High Rollers Social and Pleasure Club (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  237. ^ "'High Rollers' to Close". The New York Times. May 2, 1992. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  238. ^ The Broadway League (November 19, 1992). "3 From Brooklyn – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  239. ^ Gussow, Mel (November 20, 1992). "Review/Theater; Gags and Songs in a Revue Whose Star Is Brooklyn". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  241. ^ Gussow, Mel (April 27, 1993). "Review/Theater; Lynn Redgrave Portrays Emotional Emptiness In Royal Theater Family". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  242. ^ The Broadway League (May 5, 1994). "Sally Marr...and her escorts – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
    "Sally Marr...and Her Escorts (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  243. ^ Richards, David (May 6, 1994). "Review/Theater; Comic Survival In 'Sally Marr'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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    "The Flying Karamazov Brothers "Do the Impossible" (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  245. ^ Holden, Stephen (November 21, 1994). "Theater Review; Have Meat Cleavers. Will Juggle". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  246. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 1995). "Rob Becker's Defending the Caveman – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Rob Becker's Defending the Caveman (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  247. ^ Grimes, William (October 25, 1996). "On Stage, and Off". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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    "The Last Night of Ballyhoo (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  249. ^ "'Ballyhoo' to Close". The New York Times. June 23, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  250. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 26, 1998). "Theater Review; Complications Arise When Greed Is Good". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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    "Getting and Spending (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1998)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  252. ^ "'Band in Berlin' to Close". The New York Times. March 18, 1999. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  253. ^ The Broadway League (March 7, 1999). "Band in Berlin – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  255. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 30, 1999). "Epic Proportions – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Epic Proportions (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1999)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  256. ^ Brantley, Ben (October 1, 1999). "Theater Review; Parting the Sea With Slapstick". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
  257. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 1, 2000). "Dirty Blonde – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Dirty Blonde (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2000)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  258. ^ Brantley, Ben (May 2, 2000). "Theater Review; She Lost Her Reputation, Y'Know, and Never Missed It". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 13, 2022.
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  260. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 10, 2002). "Say Goodnight Gracie – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Say Goodnight, Gracie (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  261. ^ a b "Goodnight for 'Gracie'". The New York Times. August 14, 2003. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  262. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 15, 2003). "Golda's Balcony – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Golda's Balcony (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2003)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  263. ^ a b Gelder, Lawrence Van (October 13, 2004). "Arts, Briefly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 23, 2005). "Jackie Mason: Freshly Squeezed – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Jackie Mason: Freshly Squeezed (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  265. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (March 24, 2005). "You Call This a Show, and Tell No Old Jokes?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  266. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 13, 2005). "Latinologues – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Latinologues (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2005)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  267. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (October 14, 2005). "Skewering the Strengths and Stereotypes of Latino Life". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  268. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 10, 2007). "Xanadu – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Xanadu (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2007)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  269. ^ a b Bloom, Julie (September 17, 2008). "'Xanadu' to Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  270. ^ a b Pogrebin, Robin (July 17, 2008). "Second Stage Will Set Up a Broadway Shop at Helen Hayes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  271. ^ Gans, Andrew; Jones, Kenneth (July 16, 2008). "Second Stage Plans to Purchase Broadway's Helen Hayes Theatre". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  272. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 7, 2008). "Slava's Snowshow – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Slava's Snowshow (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2008)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  273. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (December 8, 2008). "When They Send in These Clowns, Every Day Is a Snow Day". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  274. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 15, 2008). "The 39 Steps – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  275. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (January 21, 2010). "'The 39 Steps' Dashes Off Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  276. ^ "Spider-Man hits Broadway's discount rack". Crain's New York Business. October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  277. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 2010). "Next Fall – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Next Fall (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  278. ^ a b Healy, Patrick (June 22, 2010). "'Next Fall' to Close". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  279. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 2010). "Colin Quinn: Long Story Short – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Colin Quinn: Long Story Short (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  280. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (January 6, 2011). "'Long Story Short' Grows a Little Longer on Broadway". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  281. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (January 27, 2011). "Colin Quinn's Broadway Show Will Become an HBO Special". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  282. ^ Piepenburg, Erik (January 11, 2011). "A Move, and Early Bird Specials, for 'Rock of Ages'". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  283. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 7, 2009). "Rock of Ages – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  284. ^ Kozinn, Allan (November 18, 2014). "Time Runs Out for 'Rock of Ages'". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  285. ^ "Production Gross". Playbill. January 6, 2019. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  286. ^ a b c d Dziemianowicz, Joe; Clarke, Katherine (February 13, 2015). "Broadway War: Helen Hayes Theater owners smacked by lawsuit over $25M deal to sell building". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  287. ^ "Broadway theater lands in court over $25M building deal". The Real Deal New York. February 14, 2015. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  288. ^ a b c Gioia, Michael (April 18, 2015). "Sold! Second Stage Completes Million-Dollar Purchase for the Helen Hayes, Adding Fourth Non-Profit to Broadway". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  289. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (February 17, 2015). "$25M Custody Battle Over Broadway's Hayes Theatre Heads To Court". Deadline. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  290. ^ Paulson, Michael (April 18, 2015). "Second Stage Buys Helen Hayes Theater, Ending Dispute". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  291. ^ a b Gerard, Jeremy (April 18, 2015). "Helen Hayes Theatre Sold For $24.7M, Adding Fourth Nonprofit To Broadway's Bazaar". Deadline. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  292. ^ Cox, Gordon (June 7, 2016). "Intersection of Broadway and Non-Profits Boost Creative and Commercial Growth". Variety. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  293. ^ Healy, Patrick (December 17, 2011). "Nonprofit Companies Enjoying, Well, Profits". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 12, 2022.
  294. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 22, 2015). "Dames at Sea – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Dames at Sea (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  295. ^ a b Manly, Lorne (November 23, 2015). "'Dames at Sea' Will Close on Broadway". ArtsBeat. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  296. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 18, 2016). "The Humans – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Humans (Broadway, Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  297. ^ a b c Paulson, Michael (June 23, 2016). "'The Humans' Will Stay on Broadway but Switch Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  298. ^ a b Cox, Gordon (February 13, 2018). "Nonprofit Second Stage Renovates Helen Hayes Theater on Broadway". Variety. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  299. ^ Diamond, Robert (March 15, 2018). "Industry Interview: Inside the Mind of Jujamcyn Theaters' Jordan Roth!". BroadwayWorld.com. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  300. ^ Cox, Gordon (June 28, 2016). "Broadway Real Estate: St. James Theater to Expand Stage as Helen Hayes Begins Renovations". Variety. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  301. ^ "Renovations to Begin on Broadway's St. James and Helen Hayes Theatres". TheaterMania. June 28, 2016. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 10, 2022.
  302. ^ Lindsay, Benjamin (January 30, 2019). "Second Stage's Helen Hayes Theater Checks Two Broadway 'firsts'". Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  303. ^ Paulson, Michael (April 20, 2017). "Rebuilding a Broadway Theater With American Voices". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  304. ^ Clement, Olivia (April 20, 2017). "How Second Stage Plans to Change the Face of Broadway". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  305. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 26, 2018). "Lobby Hero – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Lobby Hero (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  306. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 27, 2018). "Review: Chris Evans and Michael Cera Tell Lies to Live by in 'Lobby Hero'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  307. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 23, 2018). "Straight White Men – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Straight White Men (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  308. ^ a b Green, Jesse (July 24, 2018). "Review: 'Straight White Men,' Now Checking Their Privilege on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  309. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 2, 2018). "Review: Lessons in Love From a Drama Queen in 'Torch Song'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  310. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 31, 2019). "What the Constitution Means to Me – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "What the Constitution Means to Me (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  311. ^ a b Weinert-Kendt, Rob (April 24, 2019). "A Set as 'Intense' as the Stories the 'Constitution' Tells". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  312. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 10, 2019). "Linda Vista – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Linda Vista (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  313. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (October 11, 2019). "'Linda Vista' Review: A Womanizer Who Devastates as He Charms". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  314. ^ Heller, Scott (March 26, 2019). "Plays by Tracy Letts and Bess Wohl Headed to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  315. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 23, 2020). "Grand Horizons – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Grand Horizons (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2020)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  316. ^ a b Green, Jesse (January 24, 2020). "Review: In 'Grand Horizons,' Marriage Is a Long-Running Farce". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  317. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  318. ^ Soloski, Alexis (June 24, 2020). "For the Actors of 'Take Me Out,' a Coming-Out Party Is Postponed". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  319. ^ Wild, Stephi (November 23, 2021). "Clyde's Opens On Broadway At Second Stage's Hayes Theater Tonight". BroadwayWorld.com. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 14, 2022.
  320. ^ a b The Broadway League. "Take Me Out – Broadway Play – 2022 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Take Me Out (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  321. ^ a b Green, Jesse (April 5, 2022). "Review: In 'Take Me Out,' Whose Team Are You On?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 5, 2022.
  322. ^ a b Green, Jesse (November 24, 2021). "'Clyde's' Review: Sometimes a Hero Is More Than Just a Sandwich". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  323. ^ a b The Broadway League. "The Kite Runner – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
    "The Kite Runner (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  324. ^ White, Abbey (January 18, 2022). "'The Kite Runner' Headed to Broadway as Limited-Engagement Play". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  325. ^ a b McPhee, Ryan (May 7, 2021). "2nd Stage to Bring Between Riverside and Crazy to Broadway, Joining Lynn Nottage Play and Take Me Out". Playbill. Retrieved May 25, 2022.
  326. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 22.
  327. ^ The Broadway League (April 14, 1914). "The Truth – Broadway Play – 1914 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Truth (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1914)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  328. ^ The Broadway League (January 19, 1920). "Mamma's Affair – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Mamma's Affair (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  329. ^ The Broadway League (February 12, 1920). "He and She – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "He and She (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  330. ^ The Broadway League (May 18, 1920). "A Midsummer Night's Dream – Broadway Special – 1920 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "A Midsummer Night's Dream (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1920)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  331. ^ The Broadway League (August 15, 1923). "Little Jessie James – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Little Jessie James (Broadway, Longacre Theatre, 1923)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  332. ^ The Broadway League (October 22, 1925). "The School for Scandal – Broadway Play – 1925 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The School for Scandal (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1925)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  333. ^ The Broadway League (October 24, 1928). "Gods of the Lightning – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Gods of the Lightning (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  334. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  335. ^ The Broadway League (October 18, 1930). "London Calling – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "London Calling (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  336. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  337. ^ The Broadway League (September 29, 1930). "Mrs. Moonlight – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Mrs. Moonlight (Broadway, Embassy 49th Street Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  338. ^ The Broadway League (February 15, 1933). "One Sunday Afternoon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "One Sunday Afternoon (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  339. ^ The Broadway League (May 1, 1934). "The Lady from the Sea – Broadway Play – 1934 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Lady from the Sea (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  340. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  341. ^ The Broadway League (December 2, 1941). "Twelfth Night – Broadway Play – 1941 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Twelfth Night (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  342. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  343. ^ The Broadway League (February 3, 1964). "The Dybbuk – Broadway Play – 1964 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Dybbuk (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  344. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  345. ^ The Broadway League (February 10, 1977). "A Party with Betty Comden & Adolph Green – Broadway Musical – 1977 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  346. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  347. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 54.
  348. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 55.
  349. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 56.
  350. ^ The Broadway League (April 30, 2001). "George Gershwin Alone – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "George Gershwin Alone (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2001)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  351. ^ The Broadway League (October 28, 2001). "By Jeeves – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "By Jeeves (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2001)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  352. ^ The Broadway League (March 26, 2002). "The Smell of the Kill – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "The Smell of the Kill (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (January 26, 2006). "Bridge & Tunnel – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Bridge & Tunnel (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  354. ^ The Broadway League (August 15, 2006). "Kiki & Herb: Alive on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Kiki & Herb: Alive on Broadway (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  355. ^ The Broadway League (September 28, 2006). "Jay Johnson: The Two and Only – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Jay Johnson: The Two and Only (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2006)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  356. ^ The Broadway League (November 1, 2018). "Torch Song – Broadway Play – 2018 Revival". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Torch Song (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (November 23, 2021). "Clyde's – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
    "Clyde's (Broadway, Helen Hayes Theatre, 2021)". Playbill. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved January 11, 2022.
  358. ^ Paulson, Michael (January 18, 2022). "'The Kite Runner' Is Coming to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 30, 2022. Retrieved March 5, 2022.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]