Helen Molesworth

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Helen Molesworth is an American curator born in 1971 in Chickasaw, Alabama. She received a degree in Art History from Cornell University in 1997."[1] Her exhibitions have included This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980s,[2] and Amy Sillman: One Lump or Two.[3] She has been the curator of contemporary art at the Harvard Art Museum, the chief curator of exhibitions at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, and chief curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. From 1997 to 1999, she was director and curator of the Amelie A. Wallace Gallery at State University of New York (SUNY), Old Westbury. Molesworth also served as senior critic at the Yale School of Art and has held teaching positions at the Bard Center for Curatorial Studies; SUNY, Old Westbury; and the Cooper Union School of Art. On September 1, 2014 she started as chief curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles.[4]

Selected Exhibitions[edit]

Selected Publications[edit]

  • Molesworth, Helen. "How to Install Art as a Feminist." Modern Women: Women Artists at The Museum of Modern Art. Ed. Connie Butler, Ed. Alexandra Schwartz. Published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. 2014.
  • Catherine Opie: Empty and Full, Molesworth, Helen, ed. Hatje Cantz, Stuttgart, 2011.
  • Part Object Part Sculpture, Molesworth, Helen, ed., Penn State Press, 2005.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/BOSTON APPOINTS NEW CHIEF CURATOR". ICA Boston. Retrieved 20 April 2014. 
  2. ^ Westin, Monica. "The MCA's "This Will Have Been" and the Subjectivity of History". Art 21 Magazine. Retrieved 20 April 2014. 
  3. ^ "Amy Sillman: One Lump or Two". ICA Boston. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  4. ^ Vankin, Deborah (May 29, 2014). "MOCA names Helen Molesworth as chief curator, effective Sept. 1". Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  5. ^ Steadman, Ryan (February 2, 2016). "One of the Great American Artists Gets an American Retrospective". Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  6. ^ Miranda, Carolina A (January 8, 2016). "9 ways in which Helen Molesworth's permanent collection show at MOCA is upending the story of art". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  7. ^ Westin, Monica (February 16, 2012). "The MCA's "This Will Have Been" and the Subjectivity of History". Art21. Retrieved 10 April 2016. 
  8. ^ "SFMOMA AND WEXNER CENTER TO PRESENT FIRST U.S. RETROSPECTIVE OF THE WORK OF LUC TUYMANS". SF MoMA. Retrieved 10 April 2016.