Helen S. Mayberg

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Helen S. Mayberg was born in 1956 in California. She is an American neurologist. Mayberg is known in particular for her work delineating abnormal brain function in patients with major depression using functional neuroimaging.[1][2] This work led to the first pilot study of deep brain stimulation (DBS), a reversible method of selective modulation of a specific brain circuit, for patients with treatment-resistant depression.

Membership[edit]

Mayberg is also a member of the Governing Board of the International Neuroethics Society.[3]

Publications[edit]

  • Targeting abnormal neural circuits in mood and anxiety disorders: from the laboratory to the clinic [4]
  • Differences in Brain Glucose Metabolism Between Responders to CBT and Venlafaxine in a 16-Week Randomized Controlled Trial [5]
  • Defining the Neural Circuitry of Depression: Toward a New Nosology With Therapeutic Implications [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Witness: Ex-soldier suffered from impulse control issues". NBC News. Paducah, Kentucky. 2009-05-12. Retrieved 2018-02-12. Ruben Gur, director of neuropsychology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, told jurors Tuesday that former Pfc. Steven Dale Green would be prone to acting inappropriately in chaotic situations because of the brain damage. Gur, testifying for the defense, said the brain damage likely was caused by several head injuries. 
  2. ^ Kevin Davis (2017). The Brain Defense: Murder in Manhattan and the Dawn of Neuroscience in America's Courtrooms. Penguin. ISBN 9780698183353. Retrieved 2018-02-12. 
  3. ^ "Leadership". www.neuroethicssociety.org. Retrieved 13 February 2018. 
  4. ^ Ressler Kerry J (2007). "Targeting abnormal neural circuits in mood and anxiety disorders: from the laboratory to the clinic". Nature Neuroscience. 10: 1116–1124. doi:10.1038/nn1944. PMC 2444035Freely accessible. 
  5. ^ Kennedy Sidney (2007). "Differences in Brain Glucose Metabolism Between Responders to CBT and Venlafaxine in a 16-Week Randomized Controlled Trial". American Journal of Psychiatry. 164: 778. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.164.5.778. 
  6. ^ Elsevier Article Locator

External links[edit]