Hellas Sat 2

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Hellas Sat 2
Mission typeCommunications
OperatorHellas Sat
COSPAR ID2003-020A[1]
SATCAT no.27811[1]
WebsiteHellas Sat 2
Mission duration15 years[1]
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeEurostar-2000+[1]
ManufacturerEADS Astrium[1]
Launch mass3,250.0 kg (7,165.0 lb)[1]
BOL mass2,017.0 kg (4,446.7 lb)
Dry mass1,462.0 kg (3,223.2 lb)[1]
Dimensions3.19 × 3.48 × 7.89 m (10.5 × 11.4 × 25.9 ft)[2]
Power7.6 kW
Start of mission
Launch dateMay 13, 2003, 22:10 (2003-05-13UTC22:10Z) UTC
RocketAtlas V 401
Launch siteCape Canaveral SLC-41
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric
RegimeGeostationary
Longitude38.9° east[1][3]
Semi-major axis42,165.0 kilometres (26,200.1 mi)[3]
Perigee35,776.8 kilometres (22,230.7 mi)[3]
Apogee35,811.7 kilometres (22,252.4 mi)[3]
Inclination0.0°[3]
Period1,436.1 minutes[3]
EpochMay 23, 2017[3]
Transponders
Band30 Ku band
FrequencyUplink: 13.75-14 GHz / 14-14.25 GHz / 14.25-14.5 GHz Downlink: 12.5-12.75 GHz / 10.95-11.2 GHz / 11.45-11.7 GHz
Bandwidth36 MHz
Coverage areaAfrica, Middle East, Europe
TWTA power101 W and 105 W

Hellas Sat 2 (previously called as Intelsat APR3, Sinosat 1B, NSS 6, NSS K-TV and Intelsat K-TV) is a communications satellite operated by Hellas Sat. On 29 June 2017 the Hellas Sat 3 satellite was launched to replace the Hellas Sat 2.[4]

Launch[edit]

Hellas Sat 2 was launched by a Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, United States, at 22:10 UTC on May 13, 2003.[5]

Capacity and coverage[edit]

The 3.45 tonne satellite carries 30 Ku band transponders to provide direct-to-home voice and video transmissions to much of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, after parking over 39 degrees east longitude. Also provided television broadcasting services for the 2004 Summer Olympic Games in Athens, Greece.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Intelsat 907 (IS-907)". SatBeams – Satellite Details. Retrieved May 23, 2017.
  2. ^ "Hellas Sat 2". Weebau Space Encyclopedia. Retrieved May 23, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "HELLAS-SAT 2". N2YO. Retrieved May 23, 2017.
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ a b "Hellas Sat". NSSDC Master Catalog. Retrieved May 23, 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

External links[edit]