Hennepin County, Minnesota

Coordinates: 44°58′33″N 93°16′00″W / 44.97583°N 93.26667°W / 44.97583; -93.26667
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hennepin County
The Hennepin County Government Center, located in the county seat of Minneapolis. Its stylized letter "H" shape serves as the logo for Hennepin County.
The Hennepin County Government Center, located in the county seat of Minneapolis. Its stylized letter "H" shape serves as the logo for Hennepin County.
Flag of Hennepin County
Official logo of Hennepin County
Map of Minnesota highlighting Hennepin County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°58′33″N 93°16′00″W / 44.9758°N 93.2667°W / 44.9758; -93.2667
Country United States
State Minnesota
FoundedMarch 6, 1852[1]
Named forLouis Hennepin
SeatMinneapolis
Largest cityMinneapolis
Area
 • Total607 sq mi (1,570 km2)
 • Land554 sq mi (1,430 km2)
 • Water53 sq mi (140 km2)  8.7%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total1,281,565
 • Estimate 
(2023)
1,258,713 Decrease
 • Density2,313/sq mi (893/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Area code612, 763, 952
Congressional districts3rd, 5th
Websitewww.hennepin.us

Hennepin County (/ˈhɛnəpɪn/ HEN-ə-pin) is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. Its county seat is Minneapolis,[2] the state's most populous city.[3] The county is named in honor of the 17th-century explorer Father Louis Hennepin.[4] The county extends from Minneapolis[5] to the suburbs and outlying cities in the western part of the county. The county's natural areas are covered with extensive woods, hills, and lakes.[6][7]

As of the 2020 census, the population was 1,281,565.[8] It is the most populous county in Minnesota, and the 34th-most populous county in the United States; more than one in five Minnesotans live in Hennepin County. Hennepin County is included in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul–Bloomington Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

The Territorial Legislature of Minnesota established Hennepin County on March 6, 1852, and two years later Minneapolis was named the county seat. Father Louis Hennepin's name was chosen because he originally named Saint Anthony Falls and recorded some of the earliest accounts of the area for the Western world. In January 1855, the first bridge over the Mississippi River was built over St. Anthony Falls.[9]

Water power built the City of Minneapolis and Hennepin County. The water of streams and rivers provided power to grist mills and saw mills throughout the county. By the late 1860s, more than a dozen mills were churning out lumber near St. Anthony Falls and the population of the county had surpassed 12,000.

In many ways, the power of the falls served as the vital link between the central city and the farmsteads scattered throughout the county. Farms produced vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy products for city dwellers, while Minneapolis industries, in turn, produced lumber, furniture, farm implements and clothing.

By 1883, railroads united Minneapolis with both the East and West coasts, and technical developments, especially in flour milling, brought rapid progress to the area. The major Minneapolis millers were Washburn, Pillsbury, Bell, Dunwoody and Crosby. For a decade, the "Mill City" was the flour-milling capital of the world and one of the largest lumber producers. Minneapolis, with a population of 165,000 by 1890, had become a major American city, and by 1900, was firmly established as the hub for the Upper Midwest's industry and commerce.

Hennepin's farm economy also was substantial. In 1910, farmland in Hennepin County totaled 284,000 acres, or about 72 percent of the county's total area.[10] The principal crops were wheat, corn, garden vegetables and apples. The number of acres in production remained at a high level for the next 30 years. However, by 1950, the amount of land devoted to agriculture had been reduced to 132,000 acres as development progressed in the suburbs.

During the 1950s and 1960s, many suburbs grew rapidly as housing developments, shopping centers, large school systems and growing industrialization had replaced much of the open farm land. By 1970, the suburban population of Hennepin County outnumbered that of the city for the first time. The population of Minneapolis actually declined by 10 percent from 1960 to 1970, while the suburban population grew by nearly 50 percent.

Another wave of immigration—which began after the Vietnam War in the mid-1970s—marked a major change in the ethnic makeup of the county's immigrant populations. This wave peaked in the 1980s when hundreds of refugees from Southeast Asia, often aided by local churches, resettled in Hennepin. The population of Hennepin County surpassed the one-million mark in 1989.[11]

Geography[edit]

Soils of Hennepin County[12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 607 square miles (1,570 km2), of which 554 square miles (1,430 km2) is land and 53 square miles (140 km2) (8.7%) is water.[13] Hennepin is one of 17 Minnesota counties with more savanna soils than either prairie or forest soils, and is one of only two Minnesota counties with more than 75% of its area in savanna soils (the other is Wright County).

The highest waterfall on the Mississippi River, the Saint Anthony Falls (discovered by Louis Hennepin) is in Hennepin County next to downtown Minneapolis, but in the 19th century, the falls were converted to a series of dams. Barges and boats now pass through locks to move between the parts of the river above and below the dams.

Part of central and eastern Hennepin County on July 1, 2022, taken from the International Space Station. North is oriented mostly towards the right and somewhat up. The border between Anoka and Hennepin counties is visible along and near the Mississippi River.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
186012,849
187031,566145.7%
188067,013112.3%
1890185,294176.5%
1900228,34023.2%
1910333,48046.0%
1920415,41924.6%
1930517,78524.6%
1940568,8999.9%
1950676,57918.9%
1960842,85424.6%
1970960,08013.9%
1980941,411−1.9%
19901,032,4319.7%
20001,116,2008.1%
20101,152,4253.2%
20201,281,56511.2%
2023 (est.)1,258,713[14]−1.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790–1960[16] 1900–1990[17]
1990–2000[18] 2010–2020[19]

Race and ethnicity[edit]

The racial and ethnic composition of Hennepin County has evolved significantly over time. Initially, the region was inhabited by Native American tribes, primarily the Dakota Sioux. European settlement, beginning in the early 19th century, brought a demographic shift, with a predominantly White population of Northern European descent.[20] Throughout the 20th century, the county witnessed further diversification with the arrival of African Americans during the Great Migration, as well as Latino, Asian, and other immigrant groups in the latter half of the century.[21]

Race/ethnicity
2020[22] 2010[23] 2000[24][25] 1990[25][26]
Number % Number % Number % Number %
White alone 840,845 65.61% 826,670 71.73% 898,291 80.48% 914,870 88.61%
Black alone 169,603 13.23% 134,240 11.65% 99,943 8.95% 60,114 5.82%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 98,250 7.67% 77,676 6.74% 45,439 4.07% 13,978 1.35%
Native American alone 8,016 0.63% 8,848 0.77% 11,163 1% 14,912 1.44%
Asian alone 97,348 7.6% 71,535 6.21% 53,555 4.8% 29,258 2.83%
Other race alone 6,515 0.51% 2,752 0.24% - - 5,496 0.49%
Two or more races 60,988 4.76% 30,704 2.66% 29,041 2.6% - -

Ancestry[edit]

The most common ancestries in Hennepin County are German, Irish, English, Norwegian and Swedish.[27]

Ancestry[27] Any ancestry[a] Full ancestry[b]
Rank Population % Rank Population %
German 1 347,042 27.08 1 98,811 7.71
Irish 2 187,435 14.63 6 31,653 2.47
English 3 152,567 11.09 3 40,602 3.17
Norwegian 4 135,077 10.54 5 32,327 2.52
Swedish 5 100,544 7.85 9 18,886 1.47
African 6 75,484 5.89 2 60,478
Mexican 7 57,607 4.50
Polish 8 54,025 4.22 11 10,306 0.80
French 9 52,883 4.13 16 4,467 0.35
Somali 10 38,588 3.01 4 37,897 2.96

2010[edit]

As of the 2010 census, there were 1,152,425 people, 475,913 households, and 272,885 families living in the county. The racial makeup of the county was 74.4% White, 11.8% Black or African American, 0.9% Native American, 6.2% Asian, 3.4% from other races, and 3.2% from two or more races. 6.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

According to the 2010–2015 American Community Survey, the largest ancestry groups were German (26.3%), Norwegian (12.6%), Irish (10.8%), and Swedish (8.3%).[28]

2000[edit]

At the 2000 census, there were 1,116,200 people, 456,129 households, and 267,291 families living in the county. The population density was 774/km2 (2,000/sq mi). There were 468,824 housing units at an average density of 325/km2 (840/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 80.53% White, 8.95% Black or African American, 1.00% Native American, 4.80% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.06% from other races, and 2.60% from two or more races. 4.07% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 456,129 households, out of which 28.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.30% were married couples living together, 9.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.40% were non-families. 31.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the county 24.00% of the population was under the age of 18, 9.70% was between 18 and 24, 33.70% from 25 to 44, 21.70% from 45 to 64, and 11.00% were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $51,711, and the median income for a family was $65,985 (these figures had risen to $60,115 and $79,970 respectively as of a 2007 estimate). Accounting for inflation, these figures rise again to $76,202.87 for individuals, and $92,353.46 for households, adjusted for 2014 dollars.[29] Males had a median income of $42,466 versus $32,400 for females. The per capita income for the county was $28,789. About 5.00% of families and 8.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.50% of those under age 18 and 5.90% of those age 65 or over.

Hennepin County is the wealthiest county in Minnesota and one of the 100 highest-income counties in the United States.

Besides English, languages with significant numbers of speakers in Hennepin County include Arabic, Hmong, Khmer, Lao, Russian, Somali, Spanish, and Vietnamese.[30]

Religious statistics[edit]

In 2010 statistics, the largest religious group in Hennepin County was the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, with 215,205 Catholics worshipping at 73 parishes, followed by 124,732 ELCA Lutherans with 106 congregations, 59,811 non-denominational adherents with 103 congregations, 20,286 UMC Methodists with 42 congregations, 18,836 Missouri Synod Lutherans with 34 congregations, 16,941 PC-USA Presbyterians with 21 congregations, 16,230 Converge Baptists with 26 congregations, 16,128 AoG Pentecostals with 32 congregations, 12,307 UCC Christians with 20 congregations, and 8,608 Reform Jews with 3 congregations. Altogether, 54.3% of the population was claimed as members by religious congregations, although members of historically African-American denominations were underrepresented due to incomplete information.[31] In 2014, Hennepin County had 708 religious organizations, the 16th most out of all US counties.[32]

Law and government[edit]

County Sheriff[edit]

The Hennepin County Sheriff manages the county jail, patrols waterways, provides security for the District Court, handles home foreclosures, participates in homeland security activities and in law enforcement, and by state law is responsible for handling applications for permits to carry a firearm for residents of Hennepin County. The current County Sheriff is Dawanna Witt, who was elected in 2022.[33]

County Attorney[edit]

The Hennepin County Attorney sets policies and priorities for prosecuting criminal cases, oversees child protection and child support cases, and provides legal advice and representation to county government. The current County Attorney is Mary Moriarty, who was elected in 2022.[33]

Commissioners[edit]

Like all counties in Minnesota, Hennepin is governed by an elected and nonpartisan board of commissioners. In Minnesota, county commissions usually have five members, but Hennepin, Ramsey, Dakota, Anoka and St Louis counties have seven members. Each commissioner represents a district of approximately equal population. In Hennepin the county commission appoints the medical examiner, county auditor-treasurer and county recorder. The sheriff and county attorney are also elected on a nonpartisan ticket. The county government's headquarters are in downtown Minneapolis in the Hennepin County Government Center. The county oversees the Hennepin County Library system (which merged with the Minneapolis Public Library system in 2008), and Hennepin County Medical Center. The county commission also elects a chair who presides at meetings.

District Commissioner In office
since
Current term
expires in January
1st Jeff Lunde (Republican)[34] 2021 2025[35]
2nd Irene Fernando (DFL)[36] 2019 2027
3rd Marion Greene (DFL)[37] (chair)[38] 2014 2027
4th Angela Conley (DFL)[37] 2019 2027
5th Debbie Goettel (DFL)[39] 2017 2025[35]
6th Chris LaTondresse (DFL)[39] 2021 2025[35]
7th Kevin Anderson (DFL)[39] 2021 2025[35]

Key staff[edit]

Hennepin County's normal operations are coordinated by the County Administrator David Hough, Assistant County Administrator for Human Services Jodi Wentland, Assistant County Administrator for Operations Dan Rogan, Assistant County Administrator for Public Works Lisa Cerney, Assistant County Administrator for Disparity Reduction May Xiong, and Assistant County Administrator for Public Safety Chela Guzman-Wiegert.[40]

Politics[edit]

Like most urban counties nationwide, Hennepin County is a Democratic stronghold. It has voted Democratic in every election since 1964, except for 1972 when Richard Nixon won the county as part of a national landslide. It is also a state bellwether county, having voted for Minnesota's statewide winner in every election since 1964, the longest such streak in the state. In 2020, Joe Biden won 70% of the vote in the county, the largest percentage for any candidate since 1904.

At state level, the county is no less Democratic. For governorship and Senate, the last Republicans to win the county were Arne Carlson in 1994 and David Durenberger in 1988, respectively.

United States presidential election results for Hennepin County, Minnesota[41]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 205,973 27.25% 532,623 70.46% 17,373 2.30%
2016 191,770 28.20% 429,288 63.13% 58,919 8.66%
2012 240,073 35.30% 423,982 62.34% 16,010 2.35%
2008 231,054 34.81% 420,958 63.42% 11,768 1.77%
2004 255,133 39.43% 383,841 59.33% 8,007 1.24%
2000 225,657 39.32% 307,599 53.60% 40,590 7.07%
1996 173,887 33.17% 285,126 54.38% 65,293 12.45%
1992 179,581 30.61% 278,648 47.50% 128,390 21.89%
1988 240,209 44.60% 292,909 54.39% 5,444 1.01%
1984 253,921 47.98% 272,401 51.47% 2,912 0.55%
1980 194,898 38.57% 239,592 47.41% 70,882 14.03%
1976 211,892 43.84% 257,380 53.25% 14,106 2.92%
1972 228,951 51.64% 205,943 46.45% 8,464 1.91%
1968 170,002 41.77% 220,078 54.07% 16,944 4.16%
1964 154,736 39.00% 241,020 60.75% 971 0.24%
1960 198,992 51.26% 188,250 48.50% 939 0.24%
1956 183,248 55.01% 149,341 44.83% 523 0.16%
1952 180,338 53.49% 155,388 46.09% 1,415 0.42%
1948 121,169 42.93% 151,920 53.83% 9,145 3.24%
1944 116,781 43.69% 148,792 55.66% 1,747 0.65%
1940 122,960 45.48% 145,168 53.69% 2,230 0.82%
1936 81,206 33.08% 144,289 58.78% 19,985 8.14%
1932 91,087 41.87% 119,234 54.80% 7,245 3.33%
1928 125,472 60.19% 80,851 38.79% 2,124 1.02%
1924 101,120 59.02% 10,806 6.31% 59,401 34.67%
1920 90,517 64.58% 28,911 20.63% 20,741 14.80%
1916 27,957 40.78% 36,395 53.09% 4,204 6.13%
1912 14,379 29.64% 15,530 32.02% 18,596 38.34%
1908 27,787 58.73% 16,169 34.17% 3,357 7.10%
1904 31,437 73.71% 5,708 13.38% 5,503 12.90%
1900 26,902 62.42% 14,498 33.64% 1,695 3.93%
1896 26,786 55.47% 20,515 42.48% 987 2.04%
1892 20,603 49.93% 16,448 39.86% 4,209 10.20%

Transportation[edit]

Transit[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Airports[edit]

Economy[edit]

Major companies and employers[edit]

As the economic center of Minnesota and the Upper Midwest, Hennepin County is home to many major companies in a diverse section of industries. As of the 2018 estimate, there are twelve Fortune 500 companies headquartered in Hennepin County, five of which are located in Minneapolis.

Fortune 500 Companies in Hennepin County[42]
Company Name National Rank Revenue ($millions),

2018 Estimate

Headquarters City Industry
UnitedHealth Group 5 201,159 Minnetonka Managed Healthcare
Target 39 71,879 Minneapolis General Retailing
Best Buy 72 42,151 Richfield Electronics Retailing
U.S. Bancorp 122 23,996 Minneapolis Banking and Finance
SuperValu 180 16,009 Eden Prairie Food Distribution and Retailing
General Mills 182 15,619.8 Golden Valley Food Processing
C.H. Robinson 193 14,869.4 Eden Prairie Transportation
Ameriprise Financial 252 12,075 Minneapolis Financial Services
Xcel Energy 266 11,404 Minneapolis Electricity and Natural Gas Utility
Thrivent Financial 343 8,527.9 Minneapolis Financial Services
Mosaic 382 7,409.4 Plymouth Fertilizer Manufacturing
Polaris 496 5,504.8 Medina Snowmobile Manufacturing
From 2014 to 2015, employment in Hennepin County, MN grew at a rate of 2.61%, from 664,619 employees to 681,944 employees. The most common employment sectors for those who live in Hennepin County, MN, are Healthcare & Social Assistance, Manufacturing, and Retail trade. This chart shows the share breakdown of the primary industries for residents of Hennepin County, MN, though some of these residents may live in Hennepin County, MN and work somewhere else. Census data is tagged to a residential address, not a work address.
Tree Map of Employment by Industries in Hennepin County (2015)

Hennepin County is also home to several major private companies such as Carlson and Cargill, both located in Minnetonka, the latter of which is the largest privately owned company in the United States.[43]

Along with these major companies, Hennepin County also contains several large employers, as listed below. According to the 2016 American Community Survey, the largest overall industries in Hennepin County are healthcare and social assistance (96,511 workers), manufacturing (80,324), and retail trade (75,861).[44]

Largest employers in Hennepin County[45]
Employer Number of employees Industry
University of Minnesota 18,000 Education
Target Stores Inc 10,000 Retail
Pharmacy at Park Nicollet 9,000 Healthcare
Park Nicollet Methodist Hospital 8,200 Healthcare
Park Nicollet Clinic 8,000 Healthcare
M Health Fairview University of Minnesota Medical Center 8,000 Healthcare
M Health Fairview University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital 7,658 Healthcare
Ameriprise Financial Inc 7,000 Financial Services
Park Nicollet Urgent Care 7,000 Healthcare
Best Buy Inc 6,000 Electronics Retail

Economic indicators[edit]

According to the 2016 American Community Survey, the average household income in Hennepin County is $71,200. The GINI Index for 2016 was 0.461, lower than the national average of 0.485.[44] As of 2016, nearly 132,000 residents of Hennepin County were living under the poverty line, 10.9% of the county population.[44] This figure is lower than the national average of 14%.

Education[edit]

Tertiary education[edit]

Colleges and universities in the county include:

K–12 education[edit]

School districts include:[46]

Public libraries[edit]

Hennepin County Library (which Minneapolis Public Library merged into)

Recreation[edit]

Minnehaha Falls is the main attraction and namesake of Minnehaha Park.

Parks[edit]

Hennepin County, and in particular the city of Minneapolis, is renowned for its expansive and high-quality park system. The Minneapolis park system has been called[47] the best-designed, best-financed, and best-maintained in America.[48] The Minneapolis park system has been named the top park system in the country by the Trust for Public Land for five consecutive years as of 2017.[49] Many of the Minneapolis' numerous parks are linked by the Grand Rounds National Scenic Byway, a series of interconnected parks and paths in the city that extends for 51 miles. The byway is divided into seven districts: Downtown Riverfront, Mississippi River, Minnehaha, Chain of Lakes, Theodore Wirth, Victory Memorial, and Northeast.[50] The byway includes many major destinations in Minneapolis, including Nicollet Island, St. Anthony Falls, Stone Arch Bridge, Mill Ruins Park, Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, Minnehaha Creek, Minnehaha Park, Lake Hiawatha, Lake Nokomis, Lake Harriet, Bde Maka Ska, Lake of the Isles, Cedar Lake, and Theodore Wirth Park.

Outside of Minneapolis, Hennepin County is part of the Three Rivers Park District, a park system containing 20 parks and 10 trails spanning the Twin Cities metro area.

Culture[edit]

Numerous art institutions in Minneapolis make Hennepin County a national center for the arts. It contains some of the largest and most well-known centers for art in the country, including the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Walker Art Center, Weisman Art Museum, and the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Major art centers include Northeast Minneapolis and the Minneapolis neighborhood of North Loop. Minneapolis is home to many important artist organizations such as the Traffic Zone Center for Visual Art, the Handicraft Guild, and the Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association.

Hennepin County is also home to a thriving theater scene, highlighted by the Guthrie Theater, located in downtown Minneapolis. It is home to many theater companies such as Mixed Blood, Skewed Visions, Brave New Workshop, and Children's Theatre Company. Other notable theaters include the Orpheum Theatre, the State Theatre, and the Pantages Theatre. Additionally, many other cities in Hennepin County are home to local community theaters, such as Eden Prairie, Minnetonka, Orono, Osseo, and Plymouth.

U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings, was constructed in 2016, and was the site of Super Bowl LII.

Sports[edit]

Of the "Big Four" sports leagues in the US, three are located in Minneapolis: the Minnesota Twins play in Target Field, the Minnesota Timberwolves play in Target Center, and the Minnesota Vikings play in U.S. Bank Stadium. Additionally, among major sports leagues, the Minnesota Lynx also play in Target Center.[51]

Cities[edit]

Unorganized territory[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Archived from the original on June 20, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Our Estimates". MN State Demographic Center. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 155.
  5. ^ "Key Industries". www.greatermsp.org. Retrieved November 8, 2021.
  6. ^ "Managing rural and agricultural land". Hennepin County, Minnesota. Retrieved November 8, 2021.
  7. ^ "Natural Resources Map - Hennepin County". gis.hennepin.us. Retrieved November 8, 2021.
  8. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2023.
  9. ^ "Father Louis Hennepin Suspension Bridge | MNopedia". www.mnopedia.org. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  10. ^ Administration. "Overview of Hennepin County". Hennepin County, Minnesota. Retrieved May 24, 2023.
  11. ^ Administration. "Overview of Hennepin County". Hennepin County, Minnesota. Retrieved September 4, 2022.
  12. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011). Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 49-52. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  13. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2023". Retrieved March 18, 2024.
  15. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  19. ^ "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 12, 2021.
  20. ^ Warner, George E.; Foote, C. M. (1976). History of Hennepin County and the City of Minneapolis. Explorers and Pioneers of Minnesota; Outlines of the History of Minnesota. Marceline, MO: Walsworth. p. iv, 713. OCLC 2890166.
  21. ^ Delton, Jennifer A. (2002). Anne J. Aby (ed.). "Labor, Politics, and African American Identity in Minneapolis, 1930–1950". The North Star State: A Minnesota History Reader. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society. pp. 316–332.
  22. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Hennepin County, Minnesota". United States Census Bureau.
  23. ^ "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Hennepin County, Minnesota". United States Census Bureau.
  24. ^ "Population by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Origin: 2000" (PDF). Census.gov. January 18, 2022. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  25. ^ a b "Change in Hispanics". Crossroads Resource Center. September 28, 2000. Retrieved March 13, 2023.
  26. ^ "1990 Census of Population: General Population Characteristics Minnesota" (PDF). Census.gov. October 6, 2022. p. 21. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  27. ^ a b "Detailed Race and Ethnicities in the Hennepin County, MN: 2020 Census". Tableau. September 21, 2023. Retrieved December 5, 2023.
  28. ^ "2015 American Community Survey". Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved August 22, 2017.
  29. ^ "Inflation Calculator". www.dollartimes.com.
  30. ^ "Welcome Languages Archived July 8, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Hennepin County Public Library. Retrieved on July 8, 2010.
  31. ^ "County Membership Report Hennepin County (Minnesota)". The Association of Religion Data Archives. 2010. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  32. ^ "Social Capital Variables Spreadsheet for 2014". PennState College of Agricultural Sciences, Northeast Regional Center for Rural Development. December 8, 2017. Retrieved December 30, 2019.
  33. ^ a b "Moriarty wins Hennepin County attorney race; Witt the next county". MinnPost. November 8, 2022. Retrieved February 17, 2023.
  34. ^ "Brooklyn Park mayor defies conservative conventions, aims for state Senate". Star Tribune.
  35. ^ a b c d https://www.sos.state.mn.us/media/4582/2021-redistricting-guide.pdf [bare URL PDF]
  36. ^ "Fernando and Yang vying for Hennepin County Commissioner in District 2". Star Tribune.
  37. ^ a b "Elections 101: Hennepin County Races". August 30, 2018.
  38. ^ "Marion Greene, District 3". Hennepin.us. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  39. ^ a b c "Fresh faces on Hennepin County Board look to challenges ahead". November 11, 2020.
  40. ^ "Office of the county administrator".
  41. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org.
  42. ^ "Fortune 500 Companies 2018: Who Made the List". Fortune. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  43. ^ "America's Largest Private Companies". Forbes. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  44. ^ a b c "Hennepin County, MN". Data USA. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  45. ^ Team, XPAND Corporation: America's Career InfoNet Development. "America's Career InfoNet: Largest Employers". www.careerinfonet.org. Retrieved November 26, 2018.
  46. ^ "2020 census - school district reference map: Hennepin County, MN" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 22, 2022. Retrieved July 22, 2022.
  47. ^ “Great City Parks.” Great City Parks, by Alan Tate, Spon Press, 2004, pp. 187–192.
  48. ^ Cameron, Mark (December 1996). "Reviews : The American City: What Works, What Doesn't Alexander Garvin McGraw-Hill. New York, New York 1995. 475 pages. $59.95". Journal of Planning Education and Research. 16 (2): 148–149. doi:10.1177/0739456x9601600210. ISSN 0739-456X. S2CID 144995220.
  49. ^ "Minneapolis parks garner top honor five years running". Southwest Journal. May 26, 2017. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  50. ^ "Grand Rounds Scenic Byway System". www.minneapolisparks.org. Retrieved December 10, 2018.
  51. ^ "Sports Teams : Explore Minnesota". www.exploreminnesota.com. Retrieved December 10, 2018.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Any ancestry includes individuals identifying with either a single ethnic group (full ancestry) or with a mixed heritage from multiple groups (partial ancestry).
  2. ^ Full ancestry only includes those who identify with a single group, without any mixed heritage.

External links[edit]

Media related to Hennepin County, Minnesota at Wikimedia Commons

44°58′33″N 93°16′00″W / 44.97583°N 93.26667°W / 44.97583; -93.26667