Henri Soulé

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Henri Soulé (1903, Bayonne, France –1966 New York City)[1] was the proprietor of Le Pavillon[2] and La Côte Basque[3] restaurants in New York City. Soulé also operated The Hedges in Southampton, New York.[4]

He is credited with having “trained an entire generation of French chefs and New York restaurant owners.”[5] He is also credited with using Siberia to describe the least desirable seats in a restaurant.[6]

Biography[edit]

Soulé was a captain at the Café de Paris before becoming the mâitre d’.[7]

At the request of the French government, he came to the United States to run the Le Restaurant Français[8] at the 1939 World’s Fair. He did not return to France at the end of the Fair due to the German occupation.[9] He opened La Pavillon in 1941,[10] considered the most influential French restaurant in America in the 1940s and 50's.[11]

When he died, New York Times restaurant critic Craig Claiborne said “we had lost ‘the Michelangelo, the Mozart, the Leonardo of the French restaurant in America.’”[12] It is said he died of a stroke at La Côte Basque.[13] Another source says he died of a heart attack.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alexander, Kelly (May 3, 2017). "The Daily Meal Hall of Fame: Henri Soulé". The Daily Meal. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  2. ^ Plait, Adam. "A Nice Plate of Pike Quenelles Got a Little Harder to Find". New York Magazine. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  3. ^ Berger, Joseph (September 18, 2003). "Côte Basque, a Society Temple, Is Closing". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ "The Story Of A House". The Hedges Inn. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  5. ^ Freedman, Paul. Ten Restaurants That Changed America. Liveright Publishing. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  6. ^ Dangremond, Sam (October 21, 2016). "The 10 Most Important Restaurants in America". Town&Country Magazine. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  7. ^ Azzanto, Amy. "New York Haute Cuisine". Biblion. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  8. ^ Barelli-Persson, Laird (September 11, 2016). "A Look Back at the Legendary New York City Restaurant Haunts of Café Society and the Jet Set". Vogue. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  9. ^ "Restaurant". 1939 World’s Fair. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  10. ^ Alexander, Kelly (May 3, 2017). "The Daily Meal Hall of Fame: Henri Soulé". The Daily Meal. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  11. ^ Miller, Bryan (February 28, 1992). "Restaurants". NY Times. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 
  12. ^ Alexander, Kelly (May 3, 2017). "The Daily Meal Hall of Fame: Henri Soulé". The Daily Meal. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  13. ^ Christy, George. "George Christy Talks About Ralph Lauren, The Polo Bar, Henri Soule, Truman Capote and More!". Beverly Hills Couriet. Retrieved 20 January 2018. 
  14. ^ Freedman, Paul (October 27, 2016). "People don't like French food as much as they used to because French restaurants are pretentious". Quartz. Retrieved 21 January 2018. 

External links[edit]