Henry Bataille

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For the 19th-century soldier Henri Jules Bataille, see Henri Jules Bataille.
Henry Bataille, 1911

Félix-Henri Bataille (4 April 1872 in Nîmes – 2 March 1922 in Rueil-Malmaison) was a French dramatist and poet. His works were popular between 1900 and the start of World War I.

Bataille's parents died when he was young.[1] He attended the École des Beaux-Arts and Académie Julian [2]to study painting, but started writing when he was 14. Henry wrote plays and poems, but after the success of his second play, La Lépreuse, he became a playwright exclusively. Bataille's early works explored the effects of passion on human motivation and how stifling the social conventions of the times could be. For example, Maman Colibri, is about a middle-aged woman's affair with a younger man. Later, Bataille would gravitate towards the theater of ideas and social drama.

Bataille was also a theorist of subconscious motivation. While he did not use his theories in most of his own works, he influenced later playwrights such as Jean-Jacques Bernard and the "school of silence".

Works[edit]

  • La Belle au bois dormant, 1894
  • La Chambre blanche (poetry), 1895
  • La Lépreuse, 1896
  • L'Enchantement, 1900
  • Maman Colibri (Mother Colibri), 1904
  • La Marche nupitale, 1905
  • La Femme nue, 1908
  • Le Scandale, 1909
  • La Vierge folle (The Foolish Virgin), 1910
  • L'Amazone, 1916
  • La divine tragédie (poetry), 1917
  • L'Animateur, 1920
  • La Chair humaine (Human Flesh), 1922

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Henry Bataille", Encyclopædia Britannica Online.
  2. ^ (fr)La Rampe : revue des théâtres, music-halls, concerts, cinématographes, 1922

References[edit]

  • "Bataille, (Félix) Henri". Retrieved 17 April 2009 from Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia database, EBSCOhost
  • "Bataille, Félix Henry". Encyclopedia Americana. Grolier Online [1]
  • Buss, Robin. "Baitaille, Henry". Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. 2009. Grolier Online [2]
  • "Henry Bataille". In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 17 April 2009, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online [3]

External links[edit]