Henry Bevington

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Henry Bevington (26 July 1777[1] – 8 November 1850)[2] was a prolific English organ builder active in London during the Victorian era. Many of his organs were erected in Australia[3] and South Africa.(van der Linde 1993)

Bevington was born in London to Samuel and Elizabeth (Portsmouth) Bevington, who were Quakers.[1] He was an apprentice of Ohrmann & Nutt, and also of John Snetzler. He began his trade as journeyman with Robert Gray.(Thistlethwaite 1999, p. 58) He set up his own workshop in Greek Street, Soho, London in 1794,(Boeringer & Freeman 1989, p. 89) (this early date of 1794 is disputed),[by whom?] his earliest recorded organ is dated 1820.

Bevington was also an accomplished organist and was the organist at King's College, London.[4](Boeringer & Freeman 1989, p. 89)

He died in 1850, aged 73, and was buried at St Peter's Church, Walworth.[2]

Bevington's organ building business was continued by his sons; Henry and Martin, in Rose Street, Soho, in the same premises as were occupied by Ohrmann. The organ of St. Martin's in the Fields and of the Foundling Hospital in London, and that of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, were built by the Bevington firm.(de Pontigny 1900)(Thistlethwaite 2000)

On 21 May 1854, a fire damaged his works on Rose Street, including the original carved case being constructed for St. Martin's in the Fields, and valuable tools. Fortunately, the majority of their inventory was at the Greek Street location.[5][6]

Some organs built by Bevington & Sons[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b England & Wales, Quaker Birth, Marriage, and Death Registers, 1578-1837
  2. ^ a b London, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-2003
  3. ^ "Bevington Pipe Organ". South Australian Heritage Foundation. Retrieved 30 April 2016.
  4. ^ "Advertisements & Notices". Derby Mercury. 17 July 1861. p. 4 col E. Retrieved 30 April 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ "Fire at Messrs. Bevington's Organ Factory, Soho". London Daily News. 22 May 1854. p. 3. Retrieved 24 December 2018.
  6. ^ "Fire At Messrs. Bevington's Organ Factory, Soho". London Daily News. 22 May 1854. p. 3 col C. Retrieved 30 April 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "WESTERN PROVINCE". Cape and Natal News. 1 April 1861. Retrieved 30 April 2016 – via eGGSA Newspaper Extracts.
  8. ^ (Thistlethwaite 1999, p. 258)
  9. ^ "New Organ for the Chapel of the Foundling Hospital". Morning Advertiser. 9 October 1855. p. 3 col F. Retrieved 30 April 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ (Boeringer & Freeman 1989, p. 89)
  11. ^ "COUGHTON - SS PETER AND PAUL AND ELIZABETH". Taking Stock.
  12. ^ The British Institute of Organ Studies (2015). "Nottinghamshire Nottingham, Mechanics Hall [N13557]". The National Pipe Organ Register. Retrieved 30 April 2016. c1835
  13. ^ "Opening of the New Organ, Mechanics' Hall". Nottinghamshire Guardian. 18 October 1849. p. 3 col D. Retrieved 30 April 2016 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  14. ^ (Catholic Directory 1838, p. 148)
  15. ^ "The Organ at the Grahamstown Cathedral". grahamstowncathedral.org. Retrieved 30 April 2016.
  16. ^ (Boeringer & Freeman 1989, p. 89)
  17. ^ a b (Catholic Directory 1838, p. 148)
  18. ^ "Opening of New Organ at Turnditch. The Church". Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald. England. 18 April 1891. Retrieved 15 January 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.

Further reading[edit]