Henry Innes-Ker, 8th Duke of Roxburghe

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His Grace
The Duke of Roxburghe
KT MVO
Chancellor of the Order of the Thistle
In office
1926-1932
Preceded by The Duke of Montrose
Succeeded by The Earl of Mar
Personal details
Born Henry John Innes-Ker
24 July 1876
Died 29 September 1932 (1932-09-30) (aged 56)
Spouse(s) Mary Goelet (m. 1903)
Children George Victor Robert John Innes-Ker, 9th Duke of Roxburghe
Parents James Henry Robert Innes-Ker, 7th Duke of Roxburghe
Anne Emily Spencer-Churchill
Relatives Winston Churchill (first cousin)
Ogden Goelet (father-in-law)
Jose Collins (sister-in-law)
Residence Floors Castle
Education Royal Military College, Sandhurst
Alma mater Eton College
Military service
Allegiance  United Kingdom of Great Britain
Service/branch 4th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
Rank 2nd Lieutenant
Battles/wars Second Boer War
World War I

Henry John Innes-Ker, 8th Duke of Roxburghe KT MVO (24 July 1876 – 29 September 1932) was a Scottish peer and courtier.

Early life[edit]

Henry John Innes-Ker was born on 24 July 1876. He was the son of James Henry Robert Innes-Ker, 7th Duke of Roxburghe (1839–1892) and Lady Anne Emily Spencer-Churchill (1854–1923), the fourth daughter of John Spencer-Churchill, 7th Duke of Marlborough, who served in Conservative governments as Lord President of the Council and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and his wife, Lady Frances Vane, daughter of the 3rd Marquess of Londonderry.[1] His first cousin was Winston Churchill. His younger brother, Lord Robert Edward Innes-Ker (1885–1958) married the actress Jose Collins.[2]

He attended the Royal Military College, Sandhurst and Eton College.[3][4]

Peerage[edit]

On 23 October 1892, following his father's death, he succeeded to the titles of 8th Duke of Roxburghe, 8th Marquess of Bowmont and Cessford, 12th Earl of Roxburghe, 8th Earl of Kelso, 3rd Earl Innes, 8th Viscount of Broxmouth, 9th Baronet Innes, 12th Lord Roxburghe, and 12th Lord Ker of Cessford and Cavertoun.[3]

Career[edit]

He started his military career as a Lieutenant in the Royal Horse Guards.[4] In 1895, he gained the rank of 2nd Lieutenant in the service of the 4th Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Militia) In 1900, he served with the Household Cavalry composite regiment in South Africa during the Second Boer War.[5] In March 1901, he was appointed an Aide-de-camp to the Duke of Cornwall and York during his colonial tour March–October 1901.[6] He later served in World War I, and was severely wounded, being shot in the groin area.[7]

The Duke was appointed a Member of the Royal Victorian Order in February 1901.[8] He was appointed a Knight of the Order of the Thistle (KT) in the 1902 Coronation Honours list published on 26 June 1902,[9] and was invested by King Edward VII at Buckingham Palace on 8 August 1902.[10] He served as Chancellor of the Order of the Thistle from 1926 until his death.[3]

He served as the Lord Lieutenant of Roxburghshire from 1918 until his death. He was appointed a Lieutenant of the Royal Company of Archers in 1930.[3]

Personal life[edit]

On 10 November 1903,[11] he married Mary Goelet (1878–1937), daughter of the New York real-estate millionaire Ogden Goelet.[12] At the time of their marriage, she was the wealthiest American heiress, with a dowry of twenty million dollars, exceeded only by Consuelo Vanderbilt.[13][14] They lived at Floors Castle on 60,500 acres,[4] which Mary decorated with her own collection of art including a series of 17th century Gobelins Manufactory tapestries.[15] Together, they had one child:

The Duke of Roxburghe died on 29 September 1932 and was succeeded in his titles by his only son, George Victor Robert John Innes-Ker, 9th Duke of Roxburghe.[4][17]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Quinault 2004.
  2. ^ "Lord R. Innes-Ker weds Jose Collins; Brother of Duke of Roxburghe Married to Musical Comedy Actress in London. Ceremony was a Secret. Bride, Daughter of Late Lottie Collins, Won First Success Herein "The Merry Countess." New York Times, 4 November 1920, p. 16], (citation only)([1] full article)
  3. ^ a b c d Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, United States: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003
  4. ^ a b c d Times, Wireless To The New York (30 September 1932). "DUKE OF ROXBURGH DIES AT AGE OF 56; Stricken Suddenly After Attending Funeral of His Friend, Michael G. Herbert. | I MARRIED MAY GOELET HERE | Ceremony in 1903 One of Important Society Events of That Year | Was Wounded In War.". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  5. ^ Biggins, David. "Officers in the Relief of Kimberley". www.angloboerwar.com. Anglo Boer War. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  6. ^ "No. 27293". The London Gazette. 12 March 1901. p. 1763. 
  7. ^ Duell, Mark (27 May 2014). "How Winston Churchill lost five family members in First World War". The Daily Mail. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  8. ^ "No. 27285". The London Gazette. 15 February 1901. p. 1146. 
  9. ^ "The Coronation Honours". The Times (36804). London. 26 June 1902. p. 5. 
  10. ^ "Court Circular". The Times (36842). London. 9 August 1902. p. 6. 
  11. ^ "THE ROXBURGHE WEDDING; Private Rehearsal Held at St. Thomas's Church. Programme of Today's Ceremony -- Simple Reception to Follow at the Goelet Residence". The New York Times. 10 November 1903. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "DUKE OF ROXBURGHE MARRIES MISS GOELET; Second American Heiress to be Made a Duchess in St, Thomas's WOMEN MOB HER CARRIAGE Extraordinary Demonstration Near the Church by Faminine Sightseers Keeps Police Busy -- Reception at Mrs. Goelet's Home.". The New York Times. 11 November 1903. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  13. ^ "Marriage Announcement". New York Times. September 3, 1903. 
  14. ^ "MOTHER AND SISTER OF ROXBURGHE HERE; Duchess Denies Story of Objection to American Brides. Plans for the Wedding Complete -- The Decorations at the Church and Home of the Bride.". The New York Times. 8 November 1903. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  15. ^ "Illustrated Guide to Places to Visit - Floors Castle". Retrieved March 27, 2016. 
  16. ^ Times, Special Cable To The New York (9 September 1913). "SON AND HEIR BORN TO THE ROXBURGHES; Duke and Duchess, Former Miss May Goelet, Congratulated by King and Queen.". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  17. ^ a b Times, Special To The New York (27 September 1974). "George Innes‐Ker, Ninth Duke Of Roxburghe, Dies in Scotland". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
  18. ^ Times, Marconi Transatlantic Wireless Telegraph To The New York (24 September 1913). "King to be Roxburghe Sponsor.". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2016. 
Sources

External links[edit]


Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Lord Reay
Lord Lieutenant of Roxburghshire
1918–1932
Succeeded by
The Duke of Buccleuch
Preceded by
The Duke of Montrose
Chancellor of the Order of the Thistle
1926–1932
Succeeded by
The Earl of Mar
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
James Innes-Ker
Duke of Roxburghe
1892 – 1932
Succeeded by
George Innes-Ker