Henry Martyn Taylor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Henry Martyn Taylor, FRS, FRAS (6 June 1842, Bristol – 16 October 1927, Cambridge), was an English mathematician and barrister.[1][2][3]

Henry Martyn Taylor was the second son of the Rev. James Taylor and Eliza Johnson. He was educated in Wakefield and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. as 3rd Wrangler in 1865.[4]

He devised a Braille notation when he was overtaken by blindness in 1894, when engaged in the preparation of an edition of Euclid for the Cambridge University Press. By means of his ingenious and well thought out Braille notation he was enabled to transcribe many advanced scientific and mathematical works, and in 1917, with the assistance of Mr. Emblen, a blind member of the staff of the National Institute for the Blind, he perfected it. It was recognised as so comprehensive that it was soon adopted as the standard mathematical and chemical notation, and is universally used by English-speaking people.

He was elected Mayor of Cambridge for 1900–01.[5]

He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in Jun 1898.[6]

He died in Cambridge and is buried at the Parish of the Ascension Burial Ground in Cambridge, with his mother Eliza Taylor, née Johnson.

References[edit]

  1. ^ F., A. R. (1927-11-05). "Mr. H. M. Taylor, F.R.S.". Nature. 120 (3027): 664–665. Bibcode:1927Natur.120..664A. doi:10.1038/120664a0. 
  2. ^ "Henry Martyn Taylor". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 89: 324–325. 1929. Bibcode:1929MNRAS..89..324.. doi:10.1093/mnras/89.4.324. 
  3. ^ Addison, Henry Robert; Oakes, Charles Henry; Lawson, William John; Sladen, Douglas Brooke Wheelton (1907). "TAYLOR, Henry Martyn". Who's Who. 59: 1723. 
  4. ^ "Taylor, Henry Martyn (TLR861HM)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  5. ^ "Page 1 of 55 Cambridge Mayors - past and present" (PDF). Cambridge City Council. Retrieved 5 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "Library and Archive Catalogue". Royal Society. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 

External links[edit]