Henry Wolf (engraver)

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Henry Wolf
Henry Wolf, circa 1907, portrait by Emil Fuchs.
Henry Wolf, circa 1907, portrait by Emil Fuchs.
Born Henry Wolf
1852
Eckwersheim, Alsace, France
Died 1916
New York, New York, USA
Nationality  United States
Education Jacques Levy (Strasbourg, France)
Known for Wood engraving
Notable work Canal in Artois (1896), Miss Frances Cadwalader (Lady Erskine) (1897), Louis Stern (1905), By the River (1910), Boy with the Torn Hat (1915).
Awards Panama–Pacific International Exposition Grand Prize in Printmaking, San Francisco, 1915.

Henry Wolf (1852-1916) was a French-born wood engraver who lived and worked in the United States during his most influential work period and until his death.

Henry Wolf (1904) engraving of a painting of Louis Stern by Aimé Morot (1900). Engraving on fine Japan tissue signed by Henry Wolf and Aimé Morot.

Henry Wolf was born on August 3, 1852 in Eckwersheim, France.[1] He lived in Strasbourg and studied under Jacques Levy[2] and exhibited in Paris. Henry Wolf moved to New York City in 1871,[3] where he created wood engravings of works by Gilbert Stuart, Enrique Serra, Frank Weston Benson, Howard Pyle, Henry Salem Hubbell, John Singer Sargent, A. B. Frost, Jan Vermeer, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Aimé Morot and Édouard Manet.[3][4][5][6][7] Many of his engravings were published in Scribner's Magazine,, Harper's Monthly, and Century Magazine. In 1896 he started engraving his own artwork. He exhibited 144 wood engravings at the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. He was awarded the Exposition's Grand Prize in printmaking that year. He died in home in New York City on March 18, 1916.[1][3] His works are held in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[4][8]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Levy, Florence Nightingale (1917). American Art Annual, Volume 13. MacMillan Company. p. 320. 
  2. ^ "WOLF, Henry". The International Who's Who in the World: p. 1113. 1912. 
  3. ^ a b c "Henry Wolf Biography". The Annex Galleries. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "She Was Silent". Search Collections. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Berry Pickers' Camp". Search Collections. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  6. ^ "The Goldfish". Search Collections. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  7. ^ "A Passage from the Papers". Search Collections. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Produce Exchange. The Call Room". Collections. Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 16 January 2013.