Henry Woodyer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Henry Woodyer
Born1816
Guildford, Surrey, England
Died1896
OccupationArchitect
BuildingsHoly Jesus' Church, Lydbrook; St Martin's Church, Dorking
ProjectsCranleigh School
Holy Innocents, Highnam, Gloucestershire

Henry Woodyer (1816–1896) was an English architect, a pupil of William Butterfield and a disciple of A. W. N. Pugin and the Ecclesiologists.[1]

Life[edit]

Woodyer was born in Guildford, Surrey, England, in 1816, the son of a successful, highly respected surgeon, who owned Allen House in the Upper High Street. His mother came from the wealthy Halsey family who owned Henley Park, just outside Guildford.

Woodyer was educated first at Eton College, then at Merton College, Oxford. As a result, he could claim to be one of the best educated architects since Sir Christopher Wren. Whilst at Oxford, he became involved in the Anglican high church movement and throughout his career he saw his work as an architect as a means of serving the church.

Works[edit]

Holy Trinity Church, Millbrook, Southampton

Churches (new)[edit]

Churches (restoration or rebuilding)[edit]

Other institutional buildings[edit]

"Burning Bush", Eton College
  • School (now the Stewart Hall), Sketty, Swansea, 1853, for John Henry Vivian
  • St Edmund's Church School, Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1860[21]
  • Fisherton Anger Church School, Fisherton, Salisbury, Wiltshire, 1867[22]
  • House of Mercy, Clewer, Berkshire, 1853–73[23]
  • Cranleigh School, Surrey 1863-65 and the Chapel 1869
  • New Schools, Eton College, 1861–63[24]
  • The "Burning Bush", Eton (1864)
  • St Michael's College, Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire
  • The Chapel at St Thomas's Home for the Friendless and Fallen, Darlington Road, Basingstoke dedicated on 21 July 1885, the eve of St Mary Magdalen's feast day
  • All Saints Hospital and Chapel, Eastbourne (1867–74)[25]

Domestic buildings[edit]

  • Woodyer House, Bramley, Surrey
  • Alterations to Parc Wern (now Parc Beck), Sketty, Glamorgan, 1851–3 for H.H. Vivian
  • Church Cottage, Tutshill, Gloucestershire, c. 1852.[26]
  • Brynmill Lodge (gate-lodge) and (attributed) Verandah (a small Gothic house, 1853) at Singleton Abbey, Swansea) for J.H. Vivian
  • Alterations to Hall Place, Buckinghamshire, 1868[27]
  • Alterations to Tyntesfield, Wraxall, Somerset for Matilda Blanche Gibbs, circa 1880
  • Twyford Moors House Twyford Hants 1861
  • Creeting House, Suffolk 1863
  • St. Paul’s Mews, Reading - Built as a site office for the construction of Christ Church and gifted to the local parish on completion. Was subsequently used as a church hall for St. Paul’s church, Whitley Wood, a school and the headquarters for Thames Valley Police motorway division before being converted in to six residential dwellings in the early eighties.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Newman, Hughes & Ward, 2004
  2. ^ Nairn, Ian and Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: Surrey, 1970, page 128
  3. ^ Tyack, Bradley and Pevsner, 2010, page 445
  4. ^ Mural Painting in Britain 1840-1940: Image and Meaning, Clare A. P. Willsdon, p232 (2001)
  5. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Paul". National Heritage List for England.
  6. ^ "Inside the Grade II-listed Gothic Hackney vicarage conversion for sale". Homes and Property. 22 March 2017. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  7. ^ London 4 : North. Cherry, Bridget., Pevsner, Nikolaus, 1902-1983. New Haven: Yale University Press. 2002. p. 513. ISBN 0-300-09653-4. OCLC 719418475.CS1 maint: others (link)
  8. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 15.
  9. ^ Historic England. "Church of St John the Evangelist  (Grade II*) (1136276)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "Holy Trinity Church, Millbrook". Photograph from 1930. Port Cities: Southampton. Retrieved 19 May 2012.
  11. ^ "Church of St Luke, Burpham Lane, Burpham - Guildford | Historic England". historicengland.org.uk. Retrieved 7 February 2021.
  12. ^ Historic England. "1881 Chapel at Convent of St John the Baptist  (Grade II*) (1380282)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 October 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ Pevsner, 1966, page 178
  14. ^ Pevsner, 1966, page 180
  15. ^ Pevsner, 1966, page 300
  16. ^ Pevsner & Cherry, 1975, page 108
  17. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner, 1974, page 819
  18. ^ Pevsner & Cherry, 1975, page 188
  19. ^ Sherwood & Pevsner, 1974, page 523
  20. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Patching". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 185–192. Retrieved 24 May 2011.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  21. ^ Pevsner & Cherry, 1975, page 444
  22. ^ Pevsner & Cherry, 1975, page 459
  23. ^ Pevsner, 1966, page 305
  24. ^ Pevsner, 1960, page 129
  25. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 488.
  26. ^ Steven Morris: "The ultimate Harry Potter memorabilia: JK Rowling's childhood home is for sale", guardian.co.uk, 13 July 2011.
  27. ^ "Hall Place Parterre". Archived from the original on 27 January 2008. Retrieved 31 December 2007.

Sources[edit]