Herbert Enderton

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Herbert B. Enderton
Born Herbert Bruce Enderton
(1936-04-15)April 15, 1936
Died October 20, 2010(2010-10-20) (aged 74)
Santa Monica, California, U.S.
Nationality American
Alma mater Harvard University
Scientific career
Fields Mathematical Logic
Institutions UCLA

Herbert Bruce Enderton (April 15, 1936 – October 20, 2010)[1] was a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at UCLA and a former member of the faculties of Mathematics and of Logic and the Methodology of Science at the University of California, Berkeley.

Enderton also contributed to recursion theory, the theory of definability, models of analysis, computational complexity, and the history of logic.[2]

He earned his Ph.D. at Harvard in 1962.[3] He was a member of the American Mathematical Society from 1961 until his death.[1]

Personal life[edit]

He lived in Santa Monica. He married his wife, Cathy, in 1961 and they had two sons; Eric and Bert.[4]

Later years[edit]

From 1980 to 2002 he was coordinating editor of the reviews section of the Association for Symbolic Logic's Journal of Symbolic Logic.[5]

Death[edit]

He died from leukemia in 2010.[4]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Enderton, Herbert B. (1977). Elements of Set Theory. ISBN 0-12-238440-7.
  • Enderton, Herbert B. (1972). A Mathematical Introduction to Logic (1 ed.). Academic Press Second edition, 2001. ISBN 978-0-12-238452-3 templatestyles stripmarker in |postscript= at position 29 (help)
  • Enderton, Herbert B. (December 16, 2010). Computability Theory: An Introduction to Recursion Theory (1 ed.). Academic Press. p. 192. ISBN 978-0-12-384958-8.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Deaths of AMS Members" (PDF). Notices of the American Mathematical Society. AMS. 58 (1). January 2011.
  2. ^ Richard Zach (October 28, 2010). "Herbert B. Enderton, 1936-2010". University of Calgary. Retrieved February 9, 2011.
  3. ^ "UCLA Department of Mathematics". UCLA. Retrieved February 9, 2011.
  4. ^ a b "Obituary". Los Angeles Times. October 31, 2010. Retrieved February 9, 2011.
  5. ^ "Journals - Reviews". Association for Symbolic Logic. Retrieved February 9, 2011.

External links[edit]