Herbert Haydon Wilson

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Olympic medal record
Men's Polo
Gold medal – first place 1908 London Team competition

Herbert Haydon Wilson, DSO (14 February 1875 – 11 April 1917) was a British officer and polo player who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics.[1]

Biography[edit]

Wilson was the youngest son of Sir Samuel Wilson, of Victoria, Australia.

He was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Sherwood Rangers (Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) on 25 December 1895. Following the outbreak of the Second Boer War in late 1899, Wilson volunteered to serve in South Africa, and was in February 1900 appointed a lieutenant of the Imperial Yeomanry,[2][3] where he served with the 3rd Battalion from 1900 to 1901 (twice Mentioned in Despatches). In March 1901 he was appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) for gallantry in defence of posts in the Boer attack on Lichtenburg.[4] Promoted to a captain, he relinquished his commission with the 3rd Battalion on 18 July 1901, and was granted the honorary rank of Captain in the Army.[5]

In the 1908 Olympics, he was a member of the British polo team Roehampton, which won the gold medal.

Wilson was killed in action during the First World War, serving as a captain with the Royal Horse Guards near Arras. He was buried in the Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery nearby.[6][7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Herbert Wilson". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 1 August 2015. Retrieved 3 August 2015. 
  2. ^ "No. 27160". The London Gazette. 2 February 1900. p. 692. 
  3. ^ "No. 27163". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 February 1900. p. 911. 
  4. ^ "No. 27307". The London Gazette. 23 April 1901. p. 2775. 
  5. ^ "No. 27417". The London Gazette. 18 March 1902. p. 1882. 
  6. ^ Wilson, Herbert Hayden, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Retrieved 28 September 2008
  7. ^ "Olympians Who Were Killed or Missing in Action or Died as a Result of War". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 7 November 2014. Retrieved 3 August 2015. 

External links[edit]