2-Hexanone

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2-Hexanone[1][2]
Skeletal formula of hexan-2-one
Ball-and-stick model of hexan-2-one
Names
IUPAC name
Hexan-2-one
Other names
Methyl butyl ketone; Methyl n-butyl ketone; MNBK; Butyl methyl ketone; MBK; n-Butyl methyl ketone; Propylacetone
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.848
EC Number 209-731-1
RTECS number MP1400000
Properties
C6H12O
Molar mass 100.161 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless to light yellow liquid
Odor sharp, acetone-like[3]
Density 0.8113 g/cm³
Melting point −55.5 °C (−67.9 °F; 217.7 K)
Boiling point 127.6 °C (261.7 °F; 400.8 K)
1.4% (14 g/L)
Vapor pressure 1.3 kPa (20 °C)
-69.1·10−6 cm3/mol
1.403 (20 °C)
Viscosity 0.63 mPa·s (20 °C)
Hazards
GHS pictograms The flame pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)The health hazard pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word Danger
H226, H336, H361f, H372
P201, P202, P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P261, P264, P270, P271, P280, P281, P303+361+353, P304+340, P308+313, P312, P314, P370+378, P403+233, P403+235, P405, P501
NFPA 704
Flammability code 3: Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions. Flash point between 23 and 38 °C (73 and 100 °F). E.g., gasolineHealth code 2: Intense or continued but not chronic exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury. E.g., chloroformReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
3
2
0
Flash point 25 °C (77 °F; 298 K)
423 °C (793 °F; 696 K)
Explosive limits ?-8%[3]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
2590 mg/kg (oral, rat)
2430 mg/kg (oral, mouse)
4860 mg/kg (dermal, rabbit)
2590 mg/kg (oral, guinea pig)[4]
914 mg/kg (rat, oral)[4]
8000 ppm (rat, 4 hr)[4]
20,000 ppm (guinea pig, 70 min)[4]
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 100 ppm (410 mg/m3)[3]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 1 ppm (4 mg/m3)[3]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
1600 ppm[3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

2-Hexanone (methyl butyl ketone, MBK) is a ketone used as a general solvent and in paints. It dissolves cellulose nitrate, vinyl polymers and copolymers, and natural and synthetic resins. It is recommended as a solvent because it is photochemically inactive;[5] however it has a very low safe threshold limit value. 2-Hexanone is absorbed through the lungs, orally and dermally and its metabolite, 2,5-hexanedione, is neurotoxic.[6] Animal tests have shown that the neurotoxic effect of 2-hexanone may be potentiated by simultaneous administration of 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone, MEK).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merck Index, 11th Edition, 5955.
  2. ^ CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 75th ed. (1995)
  3. ^ a b c d e NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. "#0325". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  4. ^ a b c d "2-Hexanone". Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health Concentrations (IDLH). National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  5. ^ Dieter Stoye (2007), "Solvents", Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry (7th ed.), Wiley, p. 56
  6. ^ Jerrold B. Leikin; Frank P. Paloucek (2008), "2-Hexanone", Poisoning and Toxicology Handbook (4th ed.), Informa, p. 737
  7. ^ Wilhelm Neier; Günter Strehlke (2007), "2-Butanone", Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry (7th ed.), Wiley, p. 6