Hexanoyl chloride

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Hexanoyl chloride
Hexanoyl chloride.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Hexanoyl chloride
Other names
Caproyl chloride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.045 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 205-549-1
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C6H11ClO/c1-2-3-4-5-6(7)8/h2-5H2,1H3
    Key: YWGHUJQYGPDNKT-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CCCCCC(=O)Cl
Properties
C6H11ClO
Molar mass 134.60 g·mol−1
Hazards
Occupational safety and health (OHS/OSH):
Main hazards
Maybe toxic and corrosive
GHS labelling:
GHS02: FlammableGHS05: CorrosiveGHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H226, H302, H314, H335
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P260, P261, P264, P270, P271, P280, P301+P312, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P312, P321, P330, P363, P370+P378, P403+P233, P403+P235, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Hexanoyl chloride is a six-carbon acyl chloride with a straight-chain structure that is used as a reagent in organic synthesis.[1][2][3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hexanoyl chloride". Sigma-Aldrich. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  2. ^ Jeremy P. E. Spencer; Alan Crozier (24 April 2012). Flavonoids and Related Compounds: Bioavailability and Function. CRC Press. pp. 263–4. ISBN 978-1-4398-4827-2.
  3. ^ Vijay Kumar Thakur; Amar Singh Singha (27 April 2015). Surface Modification of Biopolymers. John Wiley & Sons. p. 265. ISBN 978-1-118-66955-6.
  4. ^ Robert Martin; Jean-Pierre Buisson (24 February 2015). Aromatic Hydroxyketones: Preparation & Physical Properties: Aromatic Hydroxyketones from Butanone (C4) to Dotriacontanone (C32). Springer. pp. 661 etc. ISBN 978-3-319-14185-5.