Hiba-Dogo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park

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Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park
比婆道後帝釈国定公園
Mt.Hiba.jpg
Location Tottori/Shimane/Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan
Nearest city Shōbara, Hiroshima Prefecture
Coordinates 35°04′12″N 133°14′09″E / 35.07000°N 133.23583°E / 35.07000; 133.23583Coordinates: 35°04′12″N 133°14′09″E / 35.07000°N 133.23583°E / 35.07000; 133.23583
Area 78.08 square kilometres (78,080,000 m2)
Established July 24, 1963

Hiba-Dogo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park (比婆道後帝釈国定公園 Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku Kokutei Kōen?) is a Quasi-National Park that spans areas of Tottori Prefecture, Shimane Prefecture, and Hiroshima Prefecture, to the east of the island of Honshu, Japan.[1][2] It was founded on 24 July 1963 and has an area of 78.08 square kilometres (78,080,000 m2).[3] As its name suggests, the Hiba-Dogo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park is composed of a series of mountains and ravines in the middle of the Chūgoku Mountains.[4] The park has virgin forests of Japanese beeches, Japanese oaks, Japanese horse-chestnuts and interesting ferns. Fauna include the Asiatic black bear, Japanese macaque, mountain hawk eagle and the Japanese giant salamander. Lake Shinryū is also a component of the park.

Mountains[edit]

Noted mountains of the Hiba-Dogo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park are Mount Hiba (1,299 m (4,262 ft)), Mount Azuma (1,240 m (4,068 ft)), Mount Sentsū (1,142 m (3,747 ft)), and Mount Dōgo (1,271 m (4,170 ft)). According to the Kojiki,[5] Mount Sentsū is noted for its association with the Susanoo myth, specifically his battle with Yamata no Orochi.[6][7]

Taishaku Ravine[edit]

The scenic Taishaku Ravine (帝釈峡 Taishaku-kyō?) in Hiroshima Prefecture,[8] an important part of the park, is formed by erosion caused by the Taishaku River.[9] The Taishaku Ravine is fully 20 kilometres (12 mi) long.[7]

Recreation[edit]

Hiba-Dogo-Taishaku Quasi-National Park is a popular destination for hiking and skiing.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "比婆道後帝釈国定公園". Ministry of the Environment. Retrieved 10 May 2011. 
  2. ^ "大和青垣/高野龍神/比婆道後帝釈/西中国山地". National Parks Association of Japan. Retrieved 10 May 2011. 
  3. ^ "List of National Parks". Ministry of the Environment. Retrieved 10 May 2011. 
  4. ^ "Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku Kokutei Kōen (比婆道後帝釈国定公園)". Nihon Kokugo Daijiten (日本国語大辞典) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-02-28. 
  5. ^ "Sentsūzan". Encyclopedia of Japan. Tokyo: Netto Adobansusha. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-02-19. 
  6. ^ "Sentsūzan". Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (日本大百科全書(ニッポニカ). Tokyo: Netto Adobansusha. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-02-23. }(Japanese)
  7. ^ a b c "Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku Kokutei Kōen (比婆道後帝釈国定公園)". Nihon Daihyakka Zensho (Nipponika) (日本大百科全書(ニッポニカ). Tokyo: Netto Adobansusha. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-04-19. }(Japanese)
  8. ^ "Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku Kokutei Kōen (比婆道後帝釈国定公園)". Dijitaru daijisen (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-04-19. 
  9. ^ "Taishaku-kyō (帝釈峡)". Nihon Kokugo Daijiten (日本国語大辞典) (in Japanese). Tokyo: Shogakukan. 2012. Archived from the original on 2007-08-25. Retrieved 2012-02-28. 

External links[edit]