Hibachi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search


A porcelain hibachi
Primitive hibachi before Edo period (Fukagawa Edo Museum)
A traditional charcoal hibachi, made circa 1880 - 1900
House of Edo period (Fukagawa Edo Museum)

The hibachi (Japanese: 火鉢, "fire bowl") is a traditional Japanese heating device. It consists of a round, cylindrical, or a box-shaped, open-topped container, made from or lined with a heatproof material and designed to hold burning charcoal.

In North America, the term "hibachi" refers to a small cooking stove heated by charcoal (called shichirin in Japanese) or to an iron hot plate (called teppan in Japanese) used in teppanyaki restaurants.

Use[edit]

As with other braziers, charcoal often sits on a layer of ash. To handle the charcoal, most often a pair of metal chopsticks is used, similar to Western fire irons and tongs, called hibashi (火箸, fire chopsticks).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Koizumi, K. (1986). Traditional Japanese Furniture: A Definitive Guide. Tokyo: Kodansha International. ISBN 978-0-87011-722-0
  • Katoh, A. S. & Katoh, Y. (1996). Blue and White Japan. Hong Kong: Turtle Publishing Co. ISBN 978-0-8048-2052-3