Hickman County, Tennessee

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Hickman County
Hickman County Courthouse in Centerville
Hickman County Courthouse in Centerville
Map of Tennessee highlighting Hickman County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35.8013° N, 87.4604° W
Country United States
State Tennessee
Founded1807
Named forEdwin Hickman, explorer[1]
SeatCenterville
Largest townCenterville
Area
 • Total613 sq mi (1,590 km2)
 • Land612 sq mi (1,590 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)  0.02%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total24,925 Increase
 • Density40/sq mi (20/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
ZIP Codes
37033, 37098, 37025, 37137, 37097, 38487, 38454, 38476, 37140[2]
Congressional district7th
Websitehickmanco.com

Hickman County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2020 Census, the population was 24,925.[3] Its county seat is Centerville.[4] Hickman County was part of the Nashville–DavidsonMurfreesboroFranklin, TN Metropolitan Statistical Area but was removed in September 2018.[5]

History[edit]

Town Square in Centerville

Hickman County was named for Edwin Hickman, an explorer and surveyor who was killed in an Indian attack at Defeated Creek[6] in 1791.

The county was established in 1807, and named for Hickman at the suggestion of Robert Weakley, a legislator who had been a member of Hickman's surveying party.[1] The original county was vast, extending to the southern border of the state. Hickman County was reduced in extent when it partially contributed to the formations of four counties: Wayne and Lawrence Counties in 1817, Perry County in 1819, and Lewis County in 1843.[citation needed]

Hickman and the Duck River valley was originally claimed by the Chickasaw people of western Tennessee and northern Mississippi. Among its first white settlers was John Gordon, the famous "Captain of the Spies" who later fought at Horseshoe Bend and at Pensacola under Andrew Jackson.

Gordon acquired land in Chickasaw territory in what is now Hickman County on the banks of the Duck River, where, in a partnership with Chief William "Chooshemataha" Colbert, he operated a ferry and Indian trading post for settlers traveling on the Natchez Trace.[7]

The trace was a war-path later made into a federal road for settlers moving from Tennessee to the lower Mississippi territory. The Chickasaw ceded the land to Tennessee in 1805 and Gordon kept the estate, moving his family there in 1812 and eventually amassing a plantation of over 1500 acres. The Gordon House still stands by the Duck River today, now maintained by the Natchez Trace National Parkway. Throughout the 19th century, the county's industry revolved around iron furnaces, which made use of the county's natural supply of high-quality iron ore.[1]

Early furnaces included Napier's furnace near Aetna, which was destroyed by Union soldiers during the Civil War, and furnaces built by the Standard Coal Company in the 1880s.[1]

Hickman natives include songwriter Beth Slater Whitson and Grand Ole Opry personality Minnie Pearl.[1] William F. Lyell was a corporal in the United States Army during the Korean War. He was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions on August 31, 1951.[citation needed]

The county is the subject of the Johnny Cash song "Saturday Night In Hickman County", and the Hickman community of Grinder's Switch is indirectly mentioned in the song, "The South's Gonna Do It Again", by the Charlie Daniels Band (one line refers to the band Grinderswitch, and their song "Right On Time").[citation needed]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 613 square miles (1,590 km2), of which 612 square miles (1,590 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (0.02%) is water.[8] The Duck River, the Piney River, and many creeks, large and small, run through Hickman County.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

  • Beaver Dam Creek Wildlife Management Area
  • MTSU Wildlife Management Area
  • John Noel State Natural Area

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18102,583
18206,080135.4%
18308,11933.5%
18408,6186.1%
18509,3979.0%
18609,312−0.9%
18709,8565.8%
188012,09522.7%
189014,49919.9%
190016,36712.9%
191016,5271.0%
192016,216−1.9%
193013,613−16.1%
194014,8739.3%
195013,353−10.2%
196011,862−11.2%
197012,0962.0%
198015,15125.3%
199016,75410.6%
200022,29533.1%
201024,69010.7%
202024,9251.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790–1960[10] 1900–1990[11]
1990–2000[12] 2010–2014[3]
Age pyramid Hickman County[13]

2020 census[edit]

Hickman County racial composition[14]
Race Number Percentage
White (non-Hispanic) 22,086 88.61%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 931 3.74%
Native American 101 0.41%
Asian 72 0.29%
Pacific Islander 1 0.0%
Other/Mixed 1,053 4.22%
Hispanic or Latino 681 2.73%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 24,925 people, 8,636 households, and 5,611 families residing in the county.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 22,295 people, 8,081 households, and 5,955 families residing in the county. The population density was 36 people per square mile (14/km2). There were 8,904 housing units at an average density of 14 per square mile (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 93.71% White, 4.53% Black or African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.08% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.29% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. 1.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 8,081 households, out of which 33.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.40% were married couples living together, 9.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.70% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 31.00% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 12.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 112.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,013, and the median income for a family was $36,342. Males had a median income of $29,411 versus $21,185 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,446. About 11.60% of families and 14.30% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.90% of those under age 18 and 18.40% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Town[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

United States presidential election results for Hickman County, Tennessee[16]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 7,577 77.06% 2,130 21.66% 125 1.27%
2016 5,695 72.89% 1,824 23.35% 294 3.76%
2012 4,758 62.59% 2,698 35.49% 146 1.92%
2008 4,784 56.30% 3,563 41.93% 151 1.78%
2004 4,359 50.26% 4,263 49.15% 51 0.59%
2000 2,914 40.12% 4,239 58.36% 111 1.53%
1996 2,002 31.19% 3,917 61.03% 499 7.78%
1992 1,820 27.06% 4,093 60.84% 814 12.10%
1988 2,246 45.67% 2,643 53.74% 29 0.59%
1984 2,370 44.43% 2,941 55.14% 23 0.43%
1980 1,903 36.39% 3,225 61.66% 102 1.95%
1976 1,154 24.11% 3,590 74.99% 43 0.90%
1972 1,943 56.06% 1,393 40.19% 130 3.75%
1968 760 17.33% 1,152 26.27% 2,473 56.40%
1964 1,019 26.16% 2,877 73.84% 0 0.00%
1960 1,224 33.20% 2,401 65.12% 62 1.68%
1956 1,040 29.75% 2,439 69.77% 17 0.49%
1952 1,044 28.38% 2,625 71.35% 10 0.27%
1948 478 16.61% 2,140 74.36% 260 9.03%
1944 618 21.71% 2,223 78.11% 5 0.18%
1940 644 18.75% 2,776 80.84% 14 0.41%
1936 353 16.30% 1,804 83.33% 8 0.37%
1932 385 17.46% 1,812 82.18% 8 0.36%
1928 510 32.95% 1,038 67.05% 0 0.00%
1924 315 25.04% 922 73.29% 21 1.67%
1920 1,470 51.63% 1,362 47.84% 15 0.53%
1916 1,026 40.55% 1,479 58.46% 25 0.99%
1912 868 38.07% 1,288 56.49% 124 5.44%
1908 1,065 44.88% 1,285 54.15% 23 0.97%
1904 922 41.64% 1,231 55.60% 61 2.76%
1900 894 40.29% 1,292 58.22% 33 1.49%
1896 988 38.50% 1,553 60.52% 25 0.97%
1892 554 27.02% 1,179 57.51% 317 15.46%
1888 1,187 43.45% 1,509 55.23% 36 1.32%
1884 709 37.87% 1,135 60.63% 28 1.50%
1880 392 24.33% 1,157 71.82% 62 3.85%
1876 179 12.33% 1,273 87.67% 0 0.00%
1872 235 20.87% 891 79.13% 0 0.00%
1868 97 48.26% 104 51.74% 0 0.00%
1860 0 0.00% 16 1.18% 1,340 98.82%
1856 0 0.00% 1,086 82.02% 238 17.98%
1852 241 22.31% 839 77.69% 0 0.00%
1848 301 23.35% 988 76.65% 0 0.00%
1844 255 19.78% 1,034 80.22% 0 0.00%
1840 293 23.53% 952 76.47% 0 0.00%
1836 149 19.35% 621 80.65% 0 0.00%


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Edward Dotson, "Hickman County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 17 October 2013.
  2. ^ "List of ZIP Codes in Hickman County Tennessee". Zillow.com. Zillow. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "U.S Census Bureau QuickFacts: Hickman County, Tennessee". U.S Census Bureau. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 2, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. ^ OMB bulletin
  6. ^ Summerlin, Cathy (February 1, 1999). Traveling Tennessee: A Complete Tour Guide to the Volunteer State from the Highlands of the Smoky Mountains to the Banks of the Mississippi River. Thomas Nelson Inc. p. 285. ISBN 978-1-4185-5968-7.
  7. ^ "The Gordon House: A Home on the Natchez Trace" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  13. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  14. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 27, 2021.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 10, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°48′N 87°28′W / 35.80°N 87.47°W / 35.80; -87.47