Hierocaesarea

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Hierocaesarea or Hierocaesarea or Hierokaisareia, from the Greek for 'sacred' and the Latin for 'Caesar's', also known as Hieracome or Hierakome, was a town and bishopric in the late Roman province of Lydia, the metropolitan see of which was Sardis. It was inhabited during Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine times.[1]

History[edit]

This town is mentioned by Ptolemy.[2] Judging from its coins, it worshipped the goddess Artemis Persica.

Its site is located near Sazoba in Asiatic Turkey.[1][3]

Bishopric[edit]

It is mentioned as an episcopal see in all the Notitiae Episcopatuum until the 12th or 13th century,.[4] but we know only three of its bishops:

The see remains a (vacant) titular see in the Roman Catholic Church, with nominal bishops appointed.[7]

  • Bishop Ernesto de Paula (1960.01.09 – 1994.12.31)
  • Bishop Timothy Phelim O’Shea, O.F.M. Cap. (1950.05.24 – 1959.04.25)
  • Bishop Franz Justus Rarkowski, S.M. (1938.01.07 – 1950.02.09)
  • Bishop John Marie Laval (1911.09.11 – 1937.06.04)
  • Bishop Giuseppe Astuni (1903.01.21 – 1911.02.21)
  • Bishop Alessandro Beniamino Zanecchia-Ginnetti, O.C.D. (1902.06.09 – 1902.06.18)
  • Bishop Désiré-François-Xavier Van Camelbeke, M.E.P. (1884.01.15 – 1901.11.09)
  • Bishop Luigi Bienna (1845.04.24 – 1882.07.02)
  • Bishop John Bede Polding, O.S.B. (later Archbishop) (1832.07.03 – 1842.04.05)[8]
  • Bishop-elect José Seguí, O.E.S.A. (later Archbishop) (1829.07.27 – 1830.07.05)
  • Bishop Antonio Maria Trigona (later Archbishop) (1806.03.31 – 1817.07.28)
  • Bishop Gregory Stapleton (1800.11.07 – 1802.05.23)
  • Bishop Charles Berington (1786.06.02 – 1798.06.08)
  • Bishop Santiago Hernández, O.P. (1757.08.13 – 1777.02.06)
  • Bishop Louis-Joseph de Châteauneuf de Rochebonne (1720.03.04 – 1722.03.01)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Richard Talbert, ed. (2000). Barrington Atlas of the Greek and Roman World. Princeton University Press. p. 56, and directory notes accompanying.
  2. ^ Ptolemy. The Geography. 6.2.16.
  3. ^ Lund University. Digital Atlas of the Roman Empire.
  4. ^ Joseph Bingham, Origines Ecclesiasticae; Or the Antiquities of the Christian Church and Other Works: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3 (Straker, 1843)p105.
  5. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1 p95 (Liverpool University Press, 2005) p95.
  6. ^ Michel Le Quien, Oriens christianus p891.
  7. ^ Titular Episcopal See of Hierocæsarea at GCatholic.org.
  8. ^ John Bede POLDING.

Sources[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Hierocæsarea". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.

Coordinates: 38°47′51″N 27°47′31″E / 38.79751°N 27.79188°E / 38.79751; 27.79188