High Times

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from High Times Magazine)
Jump to: navigation, search
High Times
Hightimes-first-issue-1974.jpg
Cover image of High Times' premiere issue, Summer 1974.
Executive editor Dan Skye
Frequency Monthly
Founder Tom Forcade
First issue  1974 (1974-Summer)
Company Trans-High Corporation
Country United States
Based in New York City
Language English
Website hightimes.com
ISSN 0362-630X

High Times is a New York-based monthly magazine founded in 1974 by Tom Forçade. The publication advocates the legalization of cannabis. The magazine has been involved in the marijuana-using counterculture since its inception.

Origins[edit]

The magazine was founded in 1974 by Tom Forçade of the Underground Press Syndicate.[1] High Times was originally meant to be a joke, a single-issue lampoon of Playboy, substituting dope for sex.[2] The magazine was at the beginning funded by drug money from the sale of illegal marijuana.[3] But the magazine found an audience, and in November 2009, celebrated its 35th anniversary.[4] Like Playboy each issue contains a centerfold photo, but instead of a nude woman, High Times typically features a cannabis plant.[citation needed]

The magazine soon became a monthly with a growing circulation audited by ABC reaching 500,000 copies an issue; rivaling Rolling Stone and National Lampoon.[citation needed] The staff quickly grew to 40 people. In addition to high-quality photography, High Times featured cutting-edge journalism covering a wide range of topics including politics, activism, drugs, sex, music and film.[citation needed] Tom Forçade was quoted as saying "Those cavemen must've been stoned, no pun intended."[citation needed] Tom Forçade’s previous attempts to reach a wide counterculture audience by creating a network of underground papers (UPS & APS) had failed, even though he had a stable of noteworthy writers, photographers, artists and cultural icons.[citation needed] Yet, through High Times, Forçade was able to get his message to the masses without relying on mainstream media.[5][6]

In 2015, the magazine announce it has appointed David Kohl as its CEO.[7] In January 2017, the magazine announced it would be relocated to in office in Los Angeles permanently.[3] This followed the legalization of marijuana in several west coasts states including California.[8]

Related endeavors[edit]

Recognition and award ceremonies[edit]

Film production[edit]

  • Produced the 1978 documentary D.O.A., directed by Lech Kowalski
  • Produced the 1989 documentary Chef Ra Escapes Babylon directed by Scott Kennedy
  • Produced the 1990 documentary Let Freedom Ring, starring Willie Nelson, Gatewood Galbraith, Chef RA and the Soul Assassins, directed by Bob Brandel
  • Produced the 1995 documentary 8th Cannabis Cup, starring the Cannabis Cup Band, directed by Beth Lasch
  • Produced the 1996 documentary 9th Cannabis Cup, starring John Trudell and Murphy's Law, directed by John Viet
  • Produced the 1999 documentary 11th Cannabis Cup, starring John Sinclair and the Blues Scholars, directed by Steven Hager
  • Produced the 2000 documentary Grow Secrets of the Dutch Masters directed by Steven Hager
  • Co-produced the 2002 indie comedy Potluck, featuring Frank Adonis, Theo Kogan, Jason Mewes and Tommy Chong and directed by Alison Thompson
  • Produced the 2003 documentary High Times Presents The Cannabis Cup directed by Steven Hager, distributed by Koch Entertainment
  • Produced the 2003 documentary Ganja Gourmet directed by David Bienenstock and starring Chef RA
  • Produced the 2005 documentary Jorge Cervantes Ultimate Grow DVD, directed by David Bienenstock
  • Produced the 2010 documentary HIGH TIMES presents Nico Escondido's Grow Like a Pro DVD, Written by Nico Escondido. Starring Nico Escondido. Feature length, educational, HD.

Book publishing[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Danko, Danny. "Norml Founder Retires – Exhale Stage Left". hightimes.com, January 6, 2005. Accessed 11 September 2009.
  2. ^ Williams, Alex (2016-04-02). "High Times Wants to Be the Playboy of Pot". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-03-15. 
  3. ^ a b Romero, Dennis (2017-01-18). "High Times Is Moving to Los Angeles". L.A. Weekly. Retrieved 2017-03-15. 
  4. ^ Krassner, Paul. "Tom Forçade: Prisoner of Romance". hightimes.com, October 1, 2009.
  5. ^ Stroup, Keith (October 9, 2009). "NORMLizer – Here's to HIGH TIMES!". High Times. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2017. 
  6. ^ Krassner, Paul (October 1, 2009). "Brain Damage Control: Tom Forçade: Prisoner of Romance". High Times. Archived from the original on May 27, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2017. 
  7. ^ Alpert, Lukas I. (2015-09-29). "High Times Magazine Names David Kohl as Chief Executive". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2017-03-15. 
  8. ^ Flamm, Matthew (January 12, 2017). "High Times magazine is leaving New York for Los Angeles". Crain's New York Business. Retrieved March 15, 2017. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]