Highland Park, Texas

Coordinates: 32°49′49″N 96°48′4″W / 32.83028°N 96.80111°W / 32.83028; -96.80111
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Highland Park, Texas
Town of Highland Park
Town Hall
Town Hall
Flag of Highland Park, Texas
Highland Park is located in Texas
Highland Park
Highland Park
Location in Texas
Coordinates: 32°49′49″N 96°48′4″W / 32.83028°N 96.80111°W / 32.83028; -96.80111
CountryUnited States
StateTexas
CountyDallas
Government
 • MayorMargo Goodwin
Area
 • Total2.24 sq mi (5.81 km2)
 • Land2.24 sq mi (5.81 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
528 ft (161 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total8,564
 • Density4,049.49/sq mi (1,563.45/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (Central)
ZIP codes
75205, 75209, 75219, 75225
Area code(s)214, 469, 945, 972
FIPS code48-33824[2]
GNIS feature ID1388240[3]
WebsiteOfficial website Edit this at Wikidata
Map

Highland Park is a town in central Dallas County, Texas, United States. The population was estimated to be 8,719 in 2022, dropping from the previously recorded 8,864 in 2020.[4] It is located between the Dallas North Tollway and U.S. Route 75 (North Central Expressway), 4 miles (6 km) north of downtown Dallas.

Highland Park is bordered on the south, east and west by Dallas and on the north by the city of University Park. Highland Park and University Park together comprise the Park Cities, an enclave of Dallas.

History[edit]

Exall Lake, Dallas, Texas (postcard, c. 1901–1907)

The land now known as Highland Park was bought in 1889 by a group of investors from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, known as the Philadelphia Place Land Association, for an average price of $377 an acre, with a total of $500,000. Henry Exall, an agent, intended to develop the land along Turtle Creek as "Philadelphia Place", exclusive housing based on parkland areas in Philadelphia. He laid gravel roads, and dammed Turtle Creek, forming Exall Lake, before the Panic of 1893 brought a blow to his fortunes, halting development. Afterwards, he began a horse breeding farm. In the 1890s, Exall Lake was a common picnic destination for Dallas residents.

In 1906, John S. Armstrong (the former partner of Thomas Marsalis, the developer of Oak Cliff), sold his meatpacking business and invested his money in a portion of the former Philadelphia Place land, to develop it under the name of "Highland Park". He chose this name as it was located on high land that overlooked downtown Dallas. Wilbur David Cook, the landscape designer who had planned Beverly Hills, California, and George E. Kessler, who had previously planned Fair Park and most of downtown Dallas, were hired to design its layout in 1907. Notably, twenty percent of the original land was set aside for parks. A second development in Highland Park was developed in 1910.

In 1913, Highland Park petitioned Dallas for annexation, but was refused. The 500 residents voted to incorporate on November 29, 1913, and incorporation was granted in 1915, when its population was 1,100. The first mayor of Highland Park was W. A. Fraser. A third and fourth development were added to the town in 1915 and 1917, respectively. In 1919, the city of Dallas sought to annex Highland Park, beginning a lengthy controversy that lasted until 1945. J. W. Bartholow and William Chloupek led the fight to resist the annexation. The final major land development occurred in 1924. In 1931, Highland Park Village was constructed, the first shopping center of its kind in the United States.

Because of its location near Dallas, Highland Park had, by the early 1930s, developed a moderately large (8,400) population, with a few businesses. Eventually the school districts and newspapers of Highland Park and University Park were combined. In the 1940s, after the failure to annex Highland Park, Dallas began annexing the land surrounding it. Reaching a population high of just under 13,000 in the late 1950s, Highland Park afterwards grew only by building houses on the remaining vacant lots, and by the destruction of old buildings. Since 1990, Highland Park has maintained strict zoning ordinances.

Geography[edit]

Lakeside Park

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2), all land. Highland Park is approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) north of the center of Dallas.[5]

Neighborhoods[edit]

Tree-lined street in Highland Park

Highland Park was first developed as Old Highland[6] which is made up of the First Section,[7] Second Section,[8] Turtle Creek Acreage,[9] Acreage Section,[10] Third Section,[11] Fourth Section,[12] and the Hackberry Creek Acreage[13] of Old Highland Park. And then the Highland Park Neighborhoods West of Preston[14] were developed.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Highland Park has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[15]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
19202,321
19308,422262.9%
194010,28822.2%
195011,40510.9%
196010,411−8.7%
197010,133−2.7%
19808,909−12.1%
19908,739−1.9%
20008,8421.2%
20108,564−3.1%
20208,8643.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]
Highland Park racial and ethnic composition as of 2020[4]
(NH = Non-Hispanic)[a]
Race Number Percentage
White (NH) 7,553 85.21%
Black or African American (NH) 74 0.83%
Native American or Alaska Native (NH) 2 0.02%
Asian (NH) 405 4.57%
Some Other Race (NH) 18 0.2%
Mixed/Multi-Racial (NH) 347 3.91%
Hispanic or Latino 465 5.25%
Total 8,864


In 2020, the racial and ethnic makeup was 85.21% non-Hispanic White, 0.83% Black, 0.02% Native American or Alaska Native, 4.57% Asian, 0.2% some other race or ethnicity, 3.91% multiracial, and 5.25% Hispanic or Latino residents of any race.[4]

According to the 2010 U.S. census,[2] there were 8,564 people, 3,411 households, and 2,426 families residing in the town. At the 2020 United States census, there were 8,864 people, 3,398 households, and 2,562 families residing in the town.[4]

Among the population in 2010, the racial makeup was 94.4% White, 0.5% African American, 0.0% Native American, 2.8% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 1.0% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. In addition, Hispanic or Latino residents of any race were 4.0% of the population.[19]

Arts and culture[edit]

Highland Park Village shopping center is located in the municipality. The Highland Park Centennial Literary Festival is held in the community.[20]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Dallas Country Club is located here.

Government[edit]

Highland Park Library, Town Hall, and Municipal Court

The Highland Park Town Hall houses municipal services. The Spanish Colonial architecture building was designed by architects Lang & Witchell.[21]

The town is largely Republican, but that margin has decreased from 89% for Ronald Reagan in 1984 to 78% for Texas native George W Bush in 2004 to 63% for Donald Trump in 2020.

Education[edit]

McCulloch Middle School and Highland Park Middle School

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

Public primary and secondary schools in Highland Park are operated by either the Highland Park Independent School District or the Dallas Independent School District.

Highland Park Independent School District[edit]

Most of the city (areas east of Roland Avenue) is served by the Highland Park Independent School District (HPISD). The HPISD portion is served by Arch H. McCulloch Middle School[22] and Highland Park Middle School, which share a campus located partially in Highland Park and partially in University Park.[23]

Three elementary schools in Highland Park, Armstrong, Boone and Bradfield, serve sections of Highland Park.[24][25]

Dallas Independent School District[edit]

A portion of Highland Park (areas west of Roland Avenue) is zoned to Dallas Independent School District.[24] The area is within Trustee District 2[26] As of 2008 Jack Lowe represents the district.[27] DISD schools that serve western Highland Park include Maple Lawn Elementary School,[28] Rusk Middle School,[29] and North Dallas High School.[30]

Prior to fall 2006, Williams Elementary School, Marsh Middle School, and W. T. White High School served western Highland Park.[31][32] After fall 2006 western Highland Park was rezoned to the schools that serve it as of 2008.[33][34]

Media[edit]

  • The Dallas Morning News is the Dallas citywide newspaper.
  • BubbleLife provides online news, discussions and neighborhood Q&A.
  • Park Cities People is a local community newspaper.
  • The Good Life-Park Cities magazine is a free 4 color monthly neighborhood periodical that is mailed to all households in Highland Park

The Highland Park Public Library is adjacent to the Highland Park Town Hall. The library building and art gallery first opened in 1930. As time passed, the art gallery was repurposed as town council chambers and a portion of the library. In 2008 the library underwent major renovations.[21]

In television[edit]

The television show Dallas used Highland Park as a filming location.[35]

Infrastructure[edit]

The town council authorized the purchasing of a fire engine and the construction of a fire house after the 1913 incorporation. The town hall was built in 1924. During the same year, a new fire station opened next to town hall. The town hall has received several renovations. Connected the town hall is the public safety building. In 2003 a portion of the public safety building was razed, and a new facility was built in its place.[21]

Highland Park employs a public safety department instead of separate police and fire/EMS departments. The public safety officers are certified as firefighters, peace officers, and paramedics. They work 24-hour shifts (with the next two days off), varying their role during the shift. EMS medical direction is provided by the BioTel system through UT-Southwestern Medical School, which provides this service to the majority of fire/EMS departments in Dallas County.

Notable people[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Note: the U.S. Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.[17][18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  3. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. October 25, 2007. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  4. ^ a b c d "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. United States Census Bureau. July 1, 2022. Retrieved May 22, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: date and year (link)
  5. ^ "Highland Park, Texas : Maps & Directions". Town of Highland Park. Archived from the original on October 25, 2011. Retrieved November 26, 2011.
  6. ^ "Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  7. ^ "First Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  8. ^ "Second Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "Turtle Creek Acreage Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  10. ^ "Acreage Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  11. ^ "Third Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  12. ^ "Fourth Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  13. ^ "Hackberry Creek Acreage Section of Old Highland Park Neighborhood". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  14. ^ "Highland Park Neighborhood West of Preston". Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  15. ^ "Highland Park, Texas Travel Weather Averages (Weatherbase)". Weatherbase. Canty and Associates LLC. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  16. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  17. ^ https://www.census.gov/[not specific enough to verify]
  18. ^ "About the Hispanic Population and its Origin". www.census.gov. Retrieved May 18, 2022.
  19. ^ "Highland Park town, Texas". US Census. Archived from the original on February 10, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2010.
  20. ^ "Highland Park book festival set to mark centennial". KXAS. April 26, 2013. Archived from the original on April 28, 2013. Retrieved July 9, 2019 – via www.nbcdfw.com.
  21. ^ a b c "Highland Park, Texas : About Town Hall". Town of Highland Park. Archived from the original on October 25, 2011. Retrieved November 29, 2011.
  22. ^ "McCulloch Intermediate School / Highland Park Middle School". mishpms.hpisd.org. Retrieved September 4, 2023.
  23. ^ "City of University Park" (PDF). City of University Park. March 23, 2009. Retrieved December 7, 2011.
  24. ^ a b "Map". Town of Highland Park. Archived from the original on January 4, 2011. Retrieved November 26, 2011.
  25. ^ "Boundary Maps". Highland Park Independent School District. Retrieved April 18, 2021. - PDF map - Compare this map to municipality maps.
  26. ^ "Trustee District 2 with School Locations" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 4, 2008. Retrieved November 24, 2008.
  27. ^ "Board of Trustees". Dallas Independent School District. Archived from the original on December 5, 2008. Retrieved November 24, 2008.
  28. ^ "Fall 2011 Maple Lawn Elementary Attendance Zone Grades PK-5" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. April 29, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  29. ^ "Fall 2011 Thomas J. Rusk Middle School Attendance Zone Grades 6-8" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. April 29, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  30. ^ "Fall 2011 North Dallas High School Attendance Zone Grades 9-12" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. April 29, 2011. Retrieved November 11, 2011.
  31. ^ "W. T. White High School Attendance Zone" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. April 18, 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 24, 2009. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  32. ^ "Marsh Middle School Attendance Zone" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. April 19, 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 29, 2008. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  33. ^ "Fall 2006 North Dallas High School (9-12) Attendance Zone" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. October 16, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 24, 2009. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  34. ^ "Fall 2006 Rusk Middle School (7-8) Attendance Zone" (PDF). Dallas Independent School District. October 16, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 24, 2009. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  35. ^ Dallas (TV Series 1978–1991) - Filming & production - IMDb, retrieved September 4, 2023
  36. ^ "Ralph K.M. Haurwitz, UT's 'Mr. Anonymous' a force behind research: Peter O'Donnell, Jr., wife have given more than $135 million for science, engineering efforts, July 4, 2010". Austin American-Statesman. Retrieved September 12, 2013.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]