Highland Park Independent School District

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This article is about the district, which serves the cities of Highland Park and University Park and part of North Dallas. For the east Amarillo area, see Highland Park Independent School District (Potter County, Texas).
Highland Park Independent School District
Location
7015 Westchester Dr. Dallas, TX 75205-1061
Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, Texas
United States
Coordinates 32°51′02″N 96°48′24″W / 32.8506°N 96.8068°W / 32.8506; -96.8068 (District office)Coordinates: 32°51′02″N 96°48′24″W / 32.8506°N 96.8068°W / 32.8506; -96.8068 (District office)
District information
"Enter to learn. Go forth to serve."
Grades PreK12
Established  ()
Superintendent Dr. Dawson Orr
Schools 7
District ID 4823250[1]
Students and staff
Students 6689 [2]
Teachers 427 [2]
Student-teacher ratio 15.66 [2]
Other information
Website www.hpisd.org

Highland Park Independent School District (HPISD) is a public school district based in University Park, Texas, within the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex.[3]

HPISD serves most of the town of Highland Park, all of the city of University Park, two affluent cities, as well as portions of Dallas. HPISD administers seven schools. It is consistently ranked among the top school districts in Texas.[citation needed][who?]

Residents of Dallas who are in HPISD are in two areas: one that is north of Greenbrier Drive, south of Northwest Highway, east of the Dallas North Tollway, and west of Douglas Avenue; and in an area west of Preston Road and north of Colgate Avenue.[4] The Dallas Independent School District surrounds HPISD on all sides.[5]

History[edit]

The Highland Park Independent School District first opened its doors in October 1914 with John S. Armstrong School, a four-room building on Cornell Avenue. Since then, the district has grown to comprise seven campuses: four elementary schools, one intermediate school, one middle school and one high school. The district has an enrollment of approximately 7,000 students and employs 750 people, including more than 430 teachers. University Park Elementary School was designed by famed Dallas architects, Lang & Witchell who designed the Magnolia Building and the Kirby Building downtown.

From 1914–2014, HPISD has been led by seven superintendents. Dawson Orr became the seventh and current superintendent for Highland Park Independent School District on December 1, 2009. He replaced Cathy Bryce, who retired after eight years with the district. Orr was previously superintendent in Wichita Falls, Texas and Pampa, Texas. He also was president of the Texas Association of School Administrators. Orr received the Superintendent of the Year award in 2008 from Communities in Schools and the Key Communicator of the Year award in 2005 from the Texas School Public Relations Association.

In 2009, the school district was rated "exemplary" by the Texas Education Agency.[6]

HPISD and Highland Park High School received national attention in September 2014 for the banning of seven books previously used in high school English studies, after a group of parents protested the contents of these books.[7] The seven books were: The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein; The Working Poor: Invisible in America by David K. Shipler; Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse; The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie; An Abundance of Katherines by John Green; The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls; and Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison.

Orr reversed the decision to suspend the books, stating in an email to parents, "I made the decision in an attempt to de-escalate the conflict, and I readily admit that it had the opposite effect. I take full responsibility for the decision, and I apologize for the disruption it has caused."[8]

Academic programs[edit]

As of 2014 the district plans to establish an elementary school Spanish learning program.[9]

Schools[edit]

McCulloch Middle School and Highland Park Middle School
Armstrong Elementary School
Bradfield Elementary School

Schools[edit]

Secondary schools[edit]

  • Highland Park High School (University Park) - grades 9-12
  • Highland Park Middle School (Highland Park and University Park)[10][10] - grades 7-8
  • Arch H. McCulloch Intermediate School (Highland Park and University Park)[10][10] - grades 5-6
    • note: middle school and intermediate school occupy separate wings of one building

Elementary schools[edit]

  • John S. Armstrong Elementary School (Highland Park) 1985-86 National Blue Ribbon School[11]
  • John S. Bradfield Elementary School (Highland Park) National Blue Ribbon School in 1989-90[11] and 2005[12]
    • Named after HPISD president John S. Bradfield, it was the second elementary school built in HPISD. It is located in Block 150 of Highland Park West,[13] and uses a Spanish Colonial Revival style. Foshee & Creek designed the school building with a cost of $68,200 ($966076.1 according to inflation). The building permit was filed in 1930.[14]
  • Robert S. Hyer Elementary School (University Park) National Blue Ribbon School in 1993-94[11] and 2005[12]
  • University Park Elementary School (University Park) National Blue Ribbon School in 1987-88[11] and 2006[12]

A new elementary school, in the Dallas city limits on property formerly owned by Northway Christian Church, is scheduled to open in August 2017. Groundbreaking occurred on June 20, 2016.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Search for Public School Districts – District Detail for Highland Park Independent School District". National Center for Education Statistics. Institute of Education Sciences. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Highland Park Isd". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "HPISD Boundary Map." Highland Park Independent School District. Accessed October 12, 2008.
  4. ^ "Live in Dallas (But Don’t Use Its Schools)" (Archive). The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved on March 8, 2016.
  5. ^ Hanson, Royce. Civic Culture and Urban Change: Governing Dallas. Wayne State University Press, April 1, 2003. ISBN 0814337473, 9780814337479. p. 82.
  6. ^ "2009 Accountability Rating System". Texas Education Agency. 
  7. ^ Repko, Melissa. "Highland Park ISD Suspends Seven Books After Parents Protest Their Content". www.dallasnews.com. Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  8. ^ Melissa, Repko. "Highland Park ISD reverses book suspensions at high school". www.dallasnews.com. Dallas Morning News. Retrieved 29 September 2014. 
  9. ^ Mathis, Emily. "Highland Park May Be Just a Little Jealous of DISD's Bilingual Students" (Archive). Dallas Observer. Monday September 15, 2014. Retrieved on September 22, 2014.
  10. ^ a b c d "Map." City of Highland Park. Retrieved on August 1, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c d Blue Ribbon Schools Program, Schools Recognized 1982-1983 Through 1999-2002 (PDF)
  12. ^ a b c Microsoft Word - list-2003.doc
  13. ^ Ferguson, Cheryl Caldwell. Highland Park and River Oaks: The Origins of Garden Suburban Community Planning in Texas (University of Texas Press, 2014). ISBN 0292759371, 9780292759374. Google Books PT197. "The Highland Park School District purchased Block 150, measuring 800 by 253 feet, for a second elementary school, the John S. Bradfield School, named after the president of the school district."
  14. ^ Ferguson, Cheryl Caldwell. Highland Park and River Oaks: The Origins of Garden Suburban Community Planning in Texas (University of Texas Press, 2014). ISBN 0292759371, 9780292759374. Google Books PT197-PT198. "The building permit for the school, at 4300 Southern Boulevard, was filed in 1930 for the $68,200 Spanish Colonial Revival-style structure, designed by Fooshee & Clark."
  15. ^ "HPISD community celebrates groundbreaking of new elementary school First new elementary school in HPISD since 1948." Highland Park Independent School District. June 21, 2016. Retrieved on August 2, 2016.

External links[edit]