Hilde Lindemann

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Hilde Lindemann (also Hilde Lindemann Nelson) is an American philosophy professor and bioethicist currently teaching at Michigan State University. Lindemann earned her M.A. at the University of Georgia in theatre history and dramatic literature (1972) before going on to earn a Ph.D. in philosophy at Fordham University in 2000.[1] Previously, she taught at the University of Tennessee and Vassar College and served as the associate editor of the Hastings Center Report (1990–95). Lindemann currently teaches courses on feminist philosophy, identity and agency, naturalized bioethics, and narrative approaches to bioethics.

Contributions to philosophy[edit]

Lindemann's work primarily focuses on feminist bioethics, the ethics of families, feminist ethics, and the social construction of identities.[2] She is the former editor of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy and was also coeditor, with Sara Ruddick and Margaret Urban Walker, of the Feminist Constructions series for Rowman & Littlefield. In addition, she coedited, with James Lindemann Nelson, a series on Reflective Bioethics for Routledge.[2] Lindemann is a Hastings Center Fellow, a member of the advisory board for the Women’s Bioethics Project (2006–), and was the president of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (2008-2009).

Professional publications[edit]

Lindemann has published numerous peer-reviewed articles in journals such as The Journal of Medical Ethics,[3] The American Journal of Bioethics,[4] The Hastings Center Report,[5] Metaphilosophy,[6] and Hypatia.[7] Her books include Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities,[8] An Invitation to Feminist Ethics,[9] Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair,[10] Alzheimer’s: Answers to Hard Questions for Families,[11] and The Patient in the Family.[12] Lindemann has also edited five collections: Feminism and Families; Stories and Their Limits: Narrative Approaches to Bioethics; Rights, Recognition, and Responsibility: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory; Meaning and Medicine: A Reader in the Philosophy of Medicine; and, with Marian Verkerk and Margaret Urban Walker, Naturalized Bioethics (Cambridge 2008). Her most recent book, Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities, was published by Oxford University Press in 2014.

Awards and distinctions[edit]

In addition to being named a Hastings Center Fellow and having been elected President of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities, Lindemann was also awarded a NWO (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research) grant (2004–2008), a National Endowment for the Humanities grant, and several grants from the University of Tennessee including the Haines-Morris grant.[1] Lindemann has also received a Distinguished Service Award from the American Society of Bioethics and is both a Fulbright scholar (1969) and a Woodrow Wilson fellow (1969).

Selected works[edit]

  • Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities. Oxford University Press, 2014.
  • An Invitation to Feminist Ethics. San Francisco: McGraw-Hill, 2006. Chapter 1, “What Is Feminist Ethics?” reprinted in Russ Shafer-Landau, ed. The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). Chapter 1 also reprinted in Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, ed., Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 14th ed. (Boston: Wadsworth, 2011).
As Hilde Lindemann Nelson
  • Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001.
  • Alzheimer’s: Answers to Hard Questions for Families. New York: Doubleday, 1996 (with James Lindemann Nelson). In Dutch translation, Amsterdam: De Arbeiderspers, 1998.
  • The Patient in the Family. New York: Routledge, 1995 (with James Lindemann Nelson).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Michigan State University/philosophy/Hilde Lindemann/CV accessed May 30, (2011)
  2. ^ a b Michigan State University/philosophy/Hilde Lindemann/CV accessed June 6, (2011)
  3. ^ Lindemann, Hilde “Theoretical Resources for a Globalized Bioethics.” Journal of Medical Ethics, (with Marian Verkerk)
  4. ^ Lindemann, Hilde “Still Concerned.” American Journal of Bioethics 10, no. 9 (2010): 46-49 (with Alice Dreger and Ellen Feder).
  5. ^ Lindemann, Hilde “Autonomy, Beneficence, and Gezelligheid: Lessons in Moral Theory from the Dutch.” Hastings Center Report 39, no. 5 (2009): 39-45
  6. ^ Lindemann, Hilde “Holding One Another (Well, Wrongly, Clumsily) in a Time of Dementia.” Metaphilosophy 40, nos. 3-4 (2009): 416-24. Reprinted in Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy, ed. Eva Feder Kittay and Licia Carlson (Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010).
  7. ^ Lindemann, Hilde “'But I Could Never Have One’: The Abortion Intuition and Moral Luck.” Special Issue in Honor of Claudia Card. Hypatia 24, no. 1 (Winter 2009): 41-55.
  8. ^ Lindemann, Hilde. Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities. Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2012.
  9. ^ Lindemann, Hilde. An Invitation to Feminist Ethics. San Francisco: McGraw-Hill, 2006. Chapter 1, “What Is Feminist Ethics?” reprinted in Russ Shafer-Landau, ed. The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). Chapter 1 also reprinted in Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer-Landau, ed., Reason and Responsibility: Readings in Some Basic Problems of Philosophy, 14th ed. (Boston: Wadsworth, 2011)
  10. ^ Lindemann, Hilde. Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001. In Danish translation, Copenhagen: Gyldendal Uddannelse, in the Socialpaedagogisk Bibliotek series, 2003.
  11. ^ Lindemann, Hilde. Alzheimer’s: Answers to Hard Questions for Families. New York: Doubleday, 1996 (with James Lindemann Nelson). In Dutch translation, Amsterdam: De Arbeiderspers, 1998.
  12. ^ Lindemann, Hilde. The Patient in the Family. New York: Routledge, 1995 (with James Lindemann Nelson)