Hippie exploitation films

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Hippie exploitation films are 1960s exploitation films about the hippie counterculture[1] with stereotypical situations associated with the movement such as marijuana and LSD use, sex and wild psychedelic parties.

Overview[edit]

From almost the beginning, Hollywood also got in on the action and produced a number of extremely lurid hippie exploitation films masquerading as cautionary public service announcements, but which were in fact aimed directly at feeding a morbid public appetite while pretending to take a moral stance. Often depicting drug-crazed hippies living and freaking out in "Manson family" style communes, such films as The Hallucination Generation (1967) and Riot on Sunset Strip (1967) depicted "hippie" youths running wild in an orgy of group sex, drugs, crime and even murder."[2] Other examples include The Love-ins, Psych-Out, The Trip, and Wild in the Streets.

One of the strangest of these films is the horror film I Drink Your Blood. Loosely inspired by Charles Manson's "family", the film follows a group of nomadic Satanist hippies when they ride into a small town and terrorize the inhabitants. The town has largely become a ghost town thanks to a large mining project nearby, and all but a couple of houses are abandoned. A young local girl is badly beaten. Her grandfather confronts the group but is attacked and dosed with LSD.

Main examples[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ MONDO MOD WORLDS OF HIPPIE REVOLT AND OTHER WEIRDNESS
  2. ^ "The Summer of Love Breeds a Season of Hate: The Effects of the Manson Murders on Public Perceptions of the Hippie Lifestyle" by Curt Rowlett
  3. ^ a b c Jeff Stafford (2009). "The Love-Ins". Turner Classic Movies. Turner Sports and Entertainment Digital Network. Retrieved 2009-04-05.
  4. ^ 10 Strange Things You'd Better Not Eat or Drink!

External links[edit]