Hippocoon (king of Sparta)

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In Greek mythology, Hippocoön (/hɪˈpɒkˌɒn, -kəˌwɒn/; Ancient Greek: Ἱπποκόων) was a Spartan king.

Family[edit]

Hippocoon was the son of the Spartan King Oebalus and Bateia. His brothers (or half-brothers) were Tyndareus and Icarius.[1] Names of Hippocoön's sons include Lycon, Alcinous, Dorycleus, Scaeus, Enarophorus, Eurytus, Bucolus, Euteiches, Lycaethus, Hippothous, Tebrus, Hippocorystes,[2] Alcimus, Dorceus, Sebrus, Eumedes,[3] Enaesimus, Alcon and Leucippus (the last three were among the Calydonian hunters).[4] Diodorus Siculus states that there were twenty of them, but gives no individual names.[5]

Mythology[edit]

When their father died, Tyndareus became king. Hippocoön, with the help of his sons, overthrew him, took the throne and expelled his brothers from the kingdom . Later, Hippocoön refused to cleanse Heracles after the death of Iphitus. Because of that, Heracles became hostile to Hippocoön, killed him and reinstated Tyndareus.[2][6] All of Hippocoön's sons were also slain by Heracles, as a revenge for the death of the young Oeonus, son of Licymnius, whom they had killed because he had stoned their dog in self-defense.[7][8] Heracles's allies in the war against Hippocoön were Cepheus of Arcadia and his twenty sons, who all, as well as Heracles's brother Iphicles, died in the battle (according to Diodorus Siculus,[5] three of Cepheus' sons did survive).

Regnal titles
Preceded by
Tyndareus
(first reign)
King of Sparta
?–?
Succeeded by
Tyndareus
(second reign)

References[edit]

  1. ^ In Bibliotheca 3. 10. 4, all three are called sons of Oebalus and Bateia; in Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3. 1. 4, Tyndareus' s mother is Gorgophone
  2. ^ a b Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. 10. 5
  3. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3. 14. 6; 3. 15. 1
  4. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 173
  5. ^ a b Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 4. 33. 5
  6. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3. 1. 4; 3. 15. 2
  7. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2. 7. 3
  8. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3. 15. 4