2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Hiral Tipirneni)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

Arizona's nine seats in the United States House of Representatives
Turnout63.00%
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 4 5
Seats won 5 4
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 1,179,193 1,139,251
Percentage 50.37% 48.66%
Swing Increase5.65% Decrease3.82%

2018 U.S. House elections in Arizona.svg
  Democratic hold
  Republican hold
  Democratic gain

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona were held on November 6, 2018, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Arizona, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2018 Arizona gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The 2018 general elections saw the Democratic party gain the 2nd Congressional district, thus flipping the state from a 5–4 Republican advantage to a 5–4 Democratic advantage, the first time since the 2012 election in which Democrats held more House seats in Arizona than the Republicans.

Contents

Overview[edit]

Results of the 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona by district:[1]

District Republican Democratic Others Total Result
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
District 1 122,784 46.14% 143,240 53.83% 65 0.03% 266,089 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 2 133,083 45.24% 161,000 54.73% 69 0.02% 294,152 100.0% Democratic Gain
District 3 64,868 36.13% 114,650 63.87% 0 0.00% 179,518 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 4 188,842 68.16% 84,521 30.51% 3,672 1.33% 277,035 100.0% Republican Hold
District 5 186,037 59.42% 127,027 40.58% 0 0.00% 313,064 100.0% Republican Hold
District 6 173,140 55.19% 140,559 44.81% 0 0.00% 313,699 100.0% Republican Hold
District 7 113,044 85.61% 19,007 14.39% 132,051 100.0% Democratic Hold
District 8 168,835 55.46% 135,569 44.53% 13 0.01% 304,417 100.0% Republican Hold
District 9 101,662 38.91% 159,583 61.09% 0 0.00% 261,245 100.0% Democratic Hold
Total 1,139,251 48.66% 1,179,193 50.37% 22,826 0.97% 2,341,270 100.0%

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is home to the Grand Canyon and stretches along the eastern and northeastern portions of the state and includes Casa Grande, Flagstaff, and Marana. This district has a significant Native-American population, making up 25% of the population in the district. This district is home to a number of Indian reservations, including the Gila River Indian Community, Hopi Reservation, and the Navajo Nation. Incumbent Democratic Congressman Tom O'Halleran won election to his first term in 2016 with 50.90 percent of the vote over Republican nominee Paul Babeu.[2] This district is one of the most competitive in the state with a PVI of R+2. In 2018, the district was one of 36 Democratic-held House districts targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
Withdrew
  • Miguel Olivas[5]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom O'Halleran (incumbent) 64,114 100%
Total votes 64,114 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Wendy
Rogers
Tiffany
Shedd
Steve
Smith
Other Undecided
Grassroots Partners (R-Smith) July 15–16, 2018 393 ± 4.6% 23% 15% 27%
Data Orbital (R-Defending Rural Arizona PAC) June 28–30, 2018 450 ± 4.59% 22% 15% 10% 3% 50%

Endorsements[edit]

Steve Smith
Individuals
Groups

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wendy Rogers 30,180 43.74%
Republican Steve Smith 25,552 37.04%
Republican Tiffany Shedd 13,260 19.22%
Total votes 68,992 100%

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Tom
O'Halleran (D)
Wendy
Rogers (R)
Other Undecided
Optimus/DDHQ October 31 – November 1, 2018 756 ± 3.56% 48% 45% 1%[26] 6%
American Viewpoint (R) October 16–18, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 46% 46% 5%
Go Right Strategies (R-Rogers) October 9–10, 2018 943 ± 3.0% 38% 44% 18%
Go Right Strategies (R-Rogers) September 27–28, 2018 738 ± 4.0% 36% 39% 24%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[27] Likely D October 3, 2018
Inside Elections[28] Lean D September 28, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[29] Likely D October 4, 2018
Daily Kos[30] Likely D September 28, 2018
Fox News[31] Lean D September 21, 2018
CNN[32] Lean D October 2, 2018
RealClearPolitics[33] Lean D September 21, 2018
The New York Times[34] Likely D September 26, 2018
Politico[35][not in citation given] Lean D September 21, 2018

Results[edit]

Arizona's 1st congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Tom O'Halleran (incumbent) 143,240 53.83%
Republican Wendy Rogers 122,784 46.14%
Write-in 65 0.02%
Total votes 266,089 100%
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is based in the southeastern corner of Arizona and includes Cochise County and parts of suburban Tucson. Republican Martha McSally was reelected to a second term in 2016, defeating Democratic opponent Matt Heinz by a margin of 57 to 43 percent in the general election.[37] In 2018, this district was one of 80 Republican-held House districts targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.[38]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
Withdrew
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Randy
Friese
Matt
Heinz
Ann
Kirkpatrick
Billy
Kovacs
Mary
Matiella
Bruce
Wheeler
Other Undecided
FM3 Research (D-Heinz) August 1–2, 2018 402 ± 4.9% 31% 26% 13% 29%
FM3 Research (D-Heinz) April 29 – May 3, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 27% 23% 4% 6% 4% 36%
Public Policy Polling (D-Heinz) May 5–7, 2017 392 ± 5.0% 6% 40% 30% 24%

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick 33,938 41.85%
Democratic Matt Heinz 23,992 29.59%
Democratic Mary Matiella 7,606 9.38%
Democratic Bruce Wheeler 6,814 8.40%
Democratic Billy Kovacs 5,350 6.60%
Democratic Barbara Sherry 2,074 2.56%
Democratic Yahya Yuksel 1,319 1.63%
Total votes 81,093 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Withdrew[edit]

Declined[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Lea Márquez Peterson 23,571 34.15%
Republican Brandon Martin 19,809 28.70%
Republican Casey Welch 14,499 21.01%
Republican Daniel Morales, Jr. 11,135 16.13%
Total votes 69,014 100%

General election[edit]

Debates[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Lea
Marquez-Peterson (R)
Ann
Kirkpatrick (D)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College September 26 – October 1, 2018 502 ± 4.5% 39% 50% 11%
Public Policy Polling (D-Heinz) February 8–10, 2018 841 ± 3.4% 34% 43%

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[27] Lean D October 3, 2018
Inside Elections[28] Lean D September 28, 2018
Sabato's Crystal Ball[29] Likely D October 4, 2018
Daily Kos[55] Lean D September 28, 2018
Fox News[31] Lean D September 21, 2018
CNN[32] Lean D October 2, 2018
RealClearPolitics[33] Lean D September 21, 2018
The New York Times[34] Lean D September 26, 2018
Politico[35][not in citation given] Lean D September 21, 2018

Results[edit]

Arizona's 2nd congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick 161,000 54.73%
Republican Lea Márquez Peterson 133,083 45.24%
Write-in 69 0.02%
Total votes 294,152 100%
Democratic gain from Republican

District 3[edit]

The third district is based in Tucson and stretches along the southern border of Arizona including Yuma, rural portions of Maricopa County such as Gila Bend, and the western suburbs of Phoenix including Avondale, Buckeye, Goodyear, and parts of Litchfield Park. Raúl Grijalva has represented this district since 2002, and ran unopposed in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 45,186 99.82%
Write-in 81 0.18%
Total votes 45,267 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates
Withdrew
  • Bill Abatecola, businessmen (endorsed Arellano).[57]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican J. Nicholas Pierson 13,090 49.87%
Republican Sergio Arellano 7,400 28.20%
Republican Edna San Miguel 5,756 21.93%
Total votes 26,246 100%

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona's 3rd congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 114,650 63.87%
Republican Nicolas Pierson 64,868 36.14%
Total votes 179,518 100%
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

The fourth district takes up most of rural northwestern and western Arizona and includes Kingman, Lake Havasu City, Prescott, and San Tan Valley. This is the most Republican district in Arizona with a PVI of R+21. Republican Paul Gosar was reelected to a fourth term in 2016 with 71% of the vote.

This congressional race received national media coverage during the general election after Democratic nominee David Brill aired television advertisements in which six of Republican incumbent Paul Gosar's nine siblings each condemned their brother and endorsed Brill, imploring residents of the fourth district to vote their brother out of office.[58] Gosar responded to this advert with a tweet in which he dismissed his siblings' criticisms and characterized the six siblings as, "disgruntled Hillary supporters" who "put political ideology before family".[59]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Brill 19,048 52.40%
Democratic Delina Disanto 17,256 47.47%
Write-in 49 0.14%
Total votes 36,353 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 94,092 100%
Total votes 94,092 100%

Green primary[edit]

Candidates
  • Haryaksha Gregor Knauer[4]

Primary results[edit]

Green primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Haryaksha Gregor Knauer 323 100%
Total votes 323 100%

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Paul
Gosar (R)
David
Brill (D)
Other Undecided
OH Predictive Insights September 25, 2018 370 ± 5.09% 57% 25% 2%[61] 16%

Results[edit]

Arizona's 4th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 188,842 68.17%
Democratic David Brill 84,521 30.51%
Green Haryaksha Gregor Knauer 3,672 1.33%
Total votes 277,035 100%
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is based in the East Valley region of suburban Phoenix and includes Gilbert and Queen Creek, as well as portions of Chandler and Mesa. Republican Andy Biggs was elected to his first term in 2016 with 64% of the vote.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joan Greene 27,222 59.32%
Democratic Jose Torres 18,671 40.68%
Total votes 45,893 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Biggs (incumbent) 86,418 100%
Total votes 86,418 100%

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona's 5th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Biggs (incumbent) 186,037 59.43%
Democratic Joan Greene 127,027 40.57%
Total votes 313,064 100%
Republican hold

District 6[edit]

The sixth district is based in northeastern suburban Phoenix and is centered around Scottsdale, and also includes many affluent communities such as Fountain Hills and Paradise Valley. Republican David Schweikert was re-elected to a third term in 2016 with 62.23% of the vote. In 2018, this district was one of 80 Republican-held House districts targeted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.[38]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
  • Anita Malik,[4] tech executive
  • Garrick McFadden,[4] attorney
  • Heather Ross,[4] nurse practitioner

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anita Malik 22,666 42.21%
Democratic Heather Ross 20,203 37.63%
Democratic Garrick McFadden 10,825 20.16%
Total votes 53,694 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 83,406 100%
Total votes 83,406 100%

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
David
Schweikert (R)
Anita
Malik (D)
Undecided
NYT Upshot/Siena College October 11–15, 2018 500 ± 4.5% 50% 36% 14%

Results[edit]

Arizona's 6th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 173,140 55.19%
Democratic Anita Malik 140,559 44.81%
Total votes 313,699 100%
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

The seventh district is based in the city of Phoenix and also includes parts of Glendale and Tolleson. This is the most Democratic district in Arizona with a PVI of D+23. Democrat Ruben Gallego was elected to a second term in 2016 with 75.12% of the vote.[2] No Republican candidate filed to run in 2018.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego (incumbent) 32,231 74.80%
Democratic Catherine Miranda 10,856 25.20%
Total votes 43,087 100%

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona's 7th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego (incumbent) 113,044 85.61%
Green Gary Swing 18,706 14.17%
Write-in 301 0.22%
Total votes 132,051 100%
Democratic hold

District 8[edit]

The eighth district is based in the West Valley region of suburban Phoenix and includes the cities of El Mirage, Peoria, and Surprise, and also many retirement communities such as Sun City. Republican Congressman Trent Franks represented the district from 2003 to 2017, winning reelection in 2016 with 68.66% of the vote.[2] Franks resigned from Congress on December 8, 2017, after a controversy regarding surrogate mothers.[64] Republican Debbie Lesko won the special election that took place on April 24, 2018, defeating Democratic nominee Hiral Tipirneni with 52.6% of the vote. In the November 2018 general election, Lesko won a full term, again defeating Tipirneni.[65]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
Removed from the ballot
Declined
  • Brianna Westbrook, political activist, Arizona LGBTQ community leader[69] (Running for Arizona state senate)
  • Robert Kyle Schuster[70][71]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Hiral Tipirneni 52,215 100%
Total votes 52,215 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates
Declined

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Debbie Lesko (incumbent) 73,776 77.17%
Republican Sandra E. Dowling 21,825 22.83%
Total votes 95,601 100%

Independent candidates[edit]

Not on the ballot

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Debbie
Lesko (R)
Hiral
Tipirneni (D)
Undecided
Lake Research Partners (D-Tipirneni) September 24–26, 2018 400 ± 4.9% 48% 44% 8%
Lake Research Partners (D-Tipirneni) August 7–13, 2018 400 49% 40% 10%

Results[edit]

Arizona's 8th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Debbie Lesko (incumbent) 168,835 55.46%
Democratic Hiral Tipirneni 135,569 44.53%
Write-in 13 <0.01%
Total votes 304,417 100%
Republican hold

District 9[edit]

The ninth district is based in suburban Phoenix and is centered around Tempe, and also includes portions of Chandler, Mesa, and Scottsdale. This district is moderately competitive with a PVI of D+4. Democrat Kyrsten Sinema was re-elected to a third term in 2016 with 60.89% of the vote.[2] In 2018, Sinema did not seek reelection to the U.S. House, instead running for U.S. Senate in order to replace Jeff Flake. In 2018, this district was one of 36 Democratic-held House districts targeted by the National Republican Congressional Committee.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
Not on the ballot
  • Talia Fuentes,[4] 2016 Democratic nominee for the 5th district[78]
Declined

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Stanton 59,066 100%
Total votes 59,066 100%

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates
  • Irina Baroness von Behr,[4] pilot, 2016 Tempe City Council candidate[80]
  • Steve Ferrara,[4] retired Navy Chief Medical Officer.[81]
  • David Giles,[4] 2016 Republican nominee[82]
Declined

Endorsements[edit]

Steve Ferrara
Groups
  • National Republican Congressional Committee[84]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results, Arizona 2018[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steve Ferrara 31,006 59.92%
Republican David Giles 16,722 32.31%
Republican Irina Baroness von Behr 4,020 7.77%
Total votes 51,748 100%

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates
On The Ballot

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona's 9th congressional district, 2018[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Greg Stanton 159,583 61.09%
Republican Steve Ferrara 101,662 38.91%
Total votes 261,245 100%
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "2016 General Election November 8, 2016 Unofficial Results". Arizona Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved November 15, 2016.
  3. ^ a b "NRCC Announces Initial Offensive Targets For The 2018 Cycle". NRCC. February 8, 2017. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at https://apps.arizona.vote/electioninfo/elections/2018-primary-election/federal/1347/3/0
  5. ^ https://www.pinalcentral.com/casa_grande_dispatch/area_news/cd-ld-candidates-withdraw-from-races-after-court-challenges/article_3481a809-03d4-5159-b3e0-a01bd7880506.html
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "2018 Arizona primary election results" (PDF). Arizona Secretary of State. Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  7. ^ Heather Smathers. "Shedd announces GOP bid for Congres s". Arizona City Independent. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  8. ^ "Tiffany Shedd". Ballotpedia. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  9. ^ "Republican Wendy Rogers announces run for Rep. Tom O'Halleran's seat". KTAR. January 23, 2018. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  10. ^ a b c Resnik, Brahm (May 15, 2017). "GOP lawmaker running for Congress in northern Arizona district". KPNX. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  11. ^ a b Steller, Tim (June 2, 2017). "Tim Steller's Notebook: Dems sense opportunity against Martha McSally". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved June 5, 2017.
  12. ^ Ted Cruz. "I urge everyone in Arizona's First Congressional District to join me in supporting @senstevesmith today". Twitter.
  13. ^ "Arizona State Treasurer and Trump Campaign COO Jeff DeWit Endorses Steve Smith for Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. January 18, 2018.
  14. ^ a b "House Freedom Caucus Co-Founders Proudly Endorse Steve Smith for Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. July 20, 2018.
  15. ^ "Congresswoman Debbie Lesko Endorses Steve Smith for Arizona's First Congressional District". Steve Smith for Congress. May 9, 2018.
  16. ^ "Former Congressman Barry Goldwater Jr. Endorses Steve Smith for Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. May 11, 2018.
  17. ^ a b c d e f "Major Endorsements Pile Up For Steve Smith". Steve Smith for Congress. October 6, 2017.
  18. ^ a b c d e f "Senate and House Leadership Endorses Steve Smith For Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. October 23, 2017.
  19. ^ Adam Kwasman [@AdamKwasman] (May 15, 2017). "I wholeheartedly support my good friend, @senstevesmith for #AZ01. He is a wonderful person, a proven constitutionalist and a true leader" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  20. ^ "Conservative Talk Show Host Josh Bernstein Endorses Steve Smith for Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. July 9, 2018.
  21. ^ David Bossie. "Along with Citizens United Political Victory Fund I'm proud to endorse full spectrum conservative @senstevesmith for Congress in AZ-1! Steve will come to Congress to support @realDonaldTrump America First agenda - build wall, cut taxes/red tape, take on failed DC status quo". Twitter.
  22. ^ "FRC Action PAC Announces Endorsement of State Sen. Steve Smith to U.S. Congress". FRC Action. April 23, 2018.
  23. ^ "Tea Party Express Endorses Steve Smith for U.S. Congress in Arizona". Tea Party Express.
  24. ^ "Gun Owners Of America Strongly Endorses Steve Smith For Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. June 15, 2018.
  25. ^ "Gun Owners Of America Strongly Endorses Steve Smith For Congress". Steve Smith for Congress. July 7, 2018.
  26. ^ "Will not vote" with 1%
  27. ^ a b "2018 House Race Ratings | The Cook Political Report". The Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2017-08-13.
  28. ^ a b "House Ratings | Inside Elections". insideelections.com. Retrieved 2018-08-18.
  29. ^ a b "2018 House". www.centerforpolitics.org. Retrieved 2017-08-13.
  30. ^ "Daily Kos: House 2018". Daily Kos. September 28, 2018. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  31. ^ a b "Fox News Midterms 2018 America's Election HQ". Fox News. Retrieved 2018-08-18.
  32. ^ a b "CNN Key Races: Path to House majority comes into focus as a dozen races move toward Democrats". Retrieved 2018-07-30.
  33. ^ a b "RealClearPolitics - 2018 Election Maps - Battle for the House 2018". www.realclearpolitics.com. Retrieved 2018-08-18.
  34. ^ a b "Elections 2018: Tracking the House Races to Watch in the 2018 Midterm Elections". Retrieved 2018-08-13.
  35. ^ a b "Who wins 2018? Predictions for Every House & Senate Election". POLITICO. Retrieved 2018-09-07.
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i "2018 Arizona general election results" (PDF). Arizona Secretary of State. Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  37. ^ Bennett, John T. (November 8, 2016). "GOP's McSally Wins Re-Election in Arizona's 2nd District". Roll Call. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  38. ^ a b http://dccc.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/MEMO-Charging-Forward-DCCC-Announces-Battlefield-Expansion-18.pdf
  39. ^ Bowman, Bridget (June 13, 2017). "McSally's 2016 Challenger Announces House Run". Roll Call. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  40. ^ Hansen, Ronald J. (July 20, 2017). "Kirkpatrick joins the list of Democrats running for McSally's congressional seat". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  41. ^ Ferguson, Joe (April 17, 2017). "Tucson Democrat Billy Kovacs announces run for seat held by McSally". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved April 18, 2017.
  42. ^ Ferguson, Joe (June 20, 2017). "Mary Matiella, retired assistant secretary of Army, enters CD2 race". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved June 20, 2017.
  43. ^ Ferguson, Joe (June 29, 2017). "Democrat Bruce Wheeler jumps into Congressional District 2 race". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  44. ^ a b Ferguson, Joe (July 24, 2017). "Local business owner Charlie Verdin steps into CD2 race". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  45. ^ Smith, Dylan (August 8, 2017). "Verdin out: And then there were ... still a number of CD2 candidates". Tucson Sentinel. Retrieved August 10, 2017.
  46. ^ a b c d Steller, Tim (April 21, 2017). "Tim Steller's Notebook: O'Reilly's priority on TV show was always O'Reilly". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved May 14, 2017.
  47. ^ a b Steller, Tim (May 11, 2017). "Tim Steller's Friday Notebook: Time for Arizona senators to stand up to Trump". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved May 14, 2017.
  48. ^ Smith, Dylan (September 29, 2017). "Friese ices Senate run after Sinema announcement". Tucson Sentinel. Retrieved September 29, 2017.
  49. ^ Nintzel, Jim (April 20, 2017). "Money and Challengers, Oh My". Tucson Weekly. Retrieved May 14, 2017.
  50. ^ Tim Steller. "Tucson Republican jumps into race for Martha McSally's seat". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  51. ^ "Arizona's 2nd Congressional District election, 2018". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 29 August 2018.
  52. ^ Whetten, Bruce (January 25, 2018). "Douglas city councilman resigns to run for Congress". Herald Review.
  53. ^ Steller, Tim. "Steller's Friday Notebook: Voters stage mini tax revolt across Tucson". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  54. ^ Ferguson, Joe. "US Rep. Martha McSally tells House colleagues she's running for Senate". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  55. ^ "Daily Kos: House 2018". Daily Kos. September 28, 2018. Retrieved October 5, 2018.
  56. ^ "12-12-17 Briefs". mcrcbriefs. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  57. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-11-10. Retrieved 2016-11-07.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  58. ^ CNN, Eric Bradner,. "Rep. Paul Gosar's siblings in new ad: Don't vote for our brother". CNN. Retrieved 2018-09-22.
  59. ^ "Siblings savage congressman in attack ad". BBC News. 2018-09-23. Retrieved 2018-09-23.
  60. ^ https://ballotpedia.org/Paul_Gosar
  61. ^ Haryaksha Gregor Knauer (G) with 2%
  62. ^ https://ballotpedia.org/United_States_House_of_Representatives_elections_in_Arizona,_2018#cite_note-9
  63. ^ Giles, Ben (January 2, 2018). "Miranda announces run for Congress". Arizona Capitol Times.
  64. ^ Bade, Rachel; Sherman, Jake (December 8, 2017). "Female aides said Franks suggested intercourse to impregnate them". Politico. Washington, D.C. Retrieved December 8, 2017.
  65. ^ Bowman, Bridget (April 25, 2018). "Republican Debbie Lesko Wins Arizona Special Election". Roll Call. Retrieved 2018-05-27.
  66. ^ "Glendale doctor enters race for Arizona's 8th Congressional District". KTAR. July 19, 2017. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  67. ^ a b Albanese, Giovanni (April 25, 2018). "Indian American Physician Hiral Tipirneni Comes Up Short in Arizona's 8th Congressional District Special Election Race". India-West. Retrieved May 26, 2018.
  68. ^ a b "Primary candidates drop off ballot following petition challenges". Glendale Star.
  69. ^ "Campaign finance data". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  70. ^ https://apps.arizona.vote/electioninfo/elections/2018-primary-election/federal/1347/3/0
  71. ^ "Schuster, Robert Kyle - Candidate overview". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  72. ^ a b Wingett Sanchez, Yvonne (December 7, 2017). "Trent Franks stepping down from Congress amid complaints from 2 former female staffers". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  73. ^ a b c d e f g h "UPDATED: Here's Everyone Who's Running To Replace Trent Franks". Phoenix New Times. December 12, 2017. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  74. ^ "Baker, Scott Allen 1972 - Candidate overview". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  75. ^ a b c d e "Arizona names who could enter the race for Franks' US House seat". KTAR. December 7, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2017.
  76. ^ "Sawdy, Steven - Candidate overview". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  77. ^ "Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton announces run for Congress". KTAR. October 5, 2017. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  78. ^ "Campaign finance data". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  79. ^ "Rep. Kyrsten Sinema says she will seek re-election to the U.S. House, won't run against Sen. Jeff Flake". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  80. ^ "Campaign finance data". FEC. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  81. ^ https://www.nationaljournal.com/hotline/print/2017/5/17
  82. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/999/201612079037709999/201612079037709999.pdf
  83. ^ "Díaz: How Kyrsten Sinema's Senate bid unravels Phoenix City Hall". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved April 15, 2018.
  84. ^ Bowman, Bridget (October 26, 2017). "NRCC Announces First 'On the Radar' Young Guns for 2018". Roll Call. Retrieved April 15, 2018.

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites for first district candidates
Official campaign websites for second district candidates
Official campaign websites for third district candidates
Official campaign websites for fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites for fifth district candidates
Official campaign websites for sixth district candidates
Official campaign websites for seventh district candidates
Official campaign websites of eighth district candidates
Official campaign websites of ninth district candidates