Hiroki Ioka

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hiroki Ioka
Statistics
Real name Hiroki Ioka
Rated at Minimumweight
Light Flyweight
Flyweight
Junior bantamweight
Nationality Japan Japanese
Born (1969-01-08) January 8, 1969 (age 48)
Sakai, Osaka, Japan
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 42
Wins 33
Wins by KO 17
Losses 8
Draws 1
No contests 0

Hiroki Ioka (井岡 弘樹, born January 8, 1969, in Sakai, Osaka, Japan) is a former Lineal & WBC Minimumweight and WBA Light flyweight champion. He was the first ever WBC Minimumweight champion, winning the title immediately after the minimumweight division was created.

Biography[edit]

Ioka entered the Miwa Tsuda Gym (current Green Tsuda Gym) while attending middle school, and made his professional debut in 1986 at the age of 17. He won the Japanese Minimumweight title in his eighth professional fight in 1987, and fought for the newly created WBC Minimumweight title the same year, winning by unanimous decision to become the youngest Japanese boxer to win a world title, at 18 years and 9 months old. This record remains unbroken today.

Ioka made his first defense against IBF and Lineal Minimumweight champion Kyung-Yun Lee in January, 1988, winning by knockout in the 12th round.[1] Ioka's trainer, Eddie Townsend, was in the hospital during the fight, and died shortly after hearing that Ioka had won. Ioka made his second defense in June, 1988, against Napa Kiatwanchai of Thailand, retaining his title by a 12-round draw. The fight was highly controversial, as Kiatwanchai's side claimed that the last round was ended almost 30 seconds early in order to make the fight a draw. Ioka had almost been knocked out by Kiatwanchai in the final round. Ioka was ordered to have a rematch with Kiatwanchai for his third defense in December, 1988, and lost his title by 12-round decision. Ioka fought Kiatwanchai again in June, 1989, for his former title, but lost again by TKO in the 11th round.

Ioka moved up to the light flyweight division, and challenged undefeated champion Myung-Woo Yuh, for the WBA Light Flyweight title in December, 1991. Ioka won a close split-decision victory, and defended his title twice in 1992. He met Yuh again in his third defense of the title in November, 1992, but lost by decision, losing his title.

Ioka moved up to the flyweight division in 1993, aiming to win titles in three weight classes, but lost to David Griman in Round 8 of the WBA Flyweight title match. He would challenge the WBA Flyweight title two more times, losing by TKO both times, and challenged WBA Super Flyweight champion Satoshi Iida in April, 1998, losing by 12-round decision. In December of that year, Ioka lost a 10-round non-title match to an unranked fighter, and decided to retire from boxing. The unranked fighter was Masamori Tokuyama, who would later defend the WBC Super Flyweight title nine times. Ioka's career record was 33-8-1 (17KOs).

Post retirement[edit]

He currently trains and manages young fighters at the Ioka Boxing Gym (Ioka Promotions), and appears on local television shows from time to time.

In 2000, Ioka fought a 14-year-old Koki Kameda in a two-round exhibition match, which was broadcast as part of a television documentary on the Kameda family. Kameda was training at the Green Tsuda Gym at the time, where Ioka trained for much of his career. Kameda scored a knockdown on the former two division title holder from a left straight and right hook combination, but the referee ruled it as a slip. The fight ended up as a two-round draw decision. Kameda would go on to controversially win one of Ioka's former titles; the WBA light flyweight title.

His nephew, Kazuto Ioka, has won six amateur boxing titles, and current world champion of WBC at Strawweight.

Professional boxing record[edit]

33 Wins (7 knockouts), 8 Losses (5 knockouts), 1 Draw[2]
Res. Record Opponent Type Round
Time
Date Location Notes
Loss 33–8–1 Japan Masamori Tokuyama TKO 5 (10)
1:13
1998–12–19 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 33–7–1 Philippines Jerry Pahayahay PTS 10 1998–09–03 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo
Loss 32–7–1 Japan Satoshi Iida MD 12 1998–04–29 Japan Aichi Prefectural Gymnasium,
Nagoya, Aichi
For WBA Super flyweight title.
Win 32–6–1 Japan Hidekazu Sakata TKO 9 (10)
1:13
1998–02–03 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 31–6–1 Philippines Pinoy Montejo UD 10 1997–11–18 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Loss 30–6–1 Venezuela José Bonilla TKO 7 (12)
2:49
1997–02–25 Japan Central Gym, Osaka, Osaka For WBA Flyweight title.
Win 30–5–1 Japan Hiroki Shinozaki KO 4 (10)
2:35
1996–10–18 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo
Win 29–5–1 Philippines Ricky Sales PTS 12 1996–06–03 Japan Green Arena, Hiroshima, Hiroshima
Win 28–5–1 Philippines Joel Nice KO 2 (10)
2:15
1996–03–31 Japan City Sogo Gym, Matsumoto, Nagano
Loss 27–5–1 Thailand Saen Sor Ploenchit TKO 10 (12)
2:42
1995–10–17 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
For WBA Flyweight title.
Win 27–4–1 South Korea Kim Dong-Soo TKO 4 (10)
1:52
1995–05–09 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 26–4–1 Philippines Lee Escobido UD 10 1995–01–10 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 25–4–1 Philippines Triffon Torralba KO 4 (10)
1:42
1994–06–27 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 24–4–1 Philippines David Franco KO 5 (10)
1:55
1994–04–13 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 23–4–1 Philippines John Medina TKO 6 (10)
2:38
1993–11–08 Japan Seaside Sports Center, Sakai, Osaka
Loss 22–4–1 Venezuela David Griman TKO 8 (12)
2:38
1993–06–21 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
For WBA Flyweight title.
Win 22–3–1 Philippines Ronnie Romero KO 2 (10)
2:31
1993–01–29 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Loss 21–3–1 South Korea Yuh Myung-Woo MD 12 1992–11–18 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Lost WBA Light flyweight title.
Win 21–2–1 South Korea Kim Bong-Jun UD 12 1992–06–15 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
For WBA Light flyweight title.
Win 20–2–1 Philippines Noel Tunacao UD 12 1992–03–31 Japan Municipal Sogo Gymnasium,
Kitakyushu, Fukuoka
For WBA Light flyweight title.
Win 19–2–1 South Korea Yuh Myung-Woo SD 12 1991–12–17 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Won WBA Light flyweight title.
Win 18–2–1 Japan Katsumi Komiyama KO 5 (10)
1:51
1991–06–27 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 17–2–1 Japan Kenji Tezuka PTS 10 1991–04–05 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo
Win 16–2–1 Philippines Max Forrosuelo UD 10 1991–01–17 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 15–2–1 Philippines Jaime Aliguin PTS 10 1990–11–24 Japan Seaside Sports Center, Sakai, Osaka
Win 14–2–1 Thailand Salagchit Sorchitphatana UD 10 1990–07–16 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 13–2–1 Indonesia John Ireng KO 9 (10)
2:17
1990–04–09 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo
Win 12–2–1 Indonesia Udin Barahudin UD 10 1990–01–29 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Loss 11–2–1 Thailand Napa Kiatwanchai TKO 11 (12)
1:12
1989–06–10 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
For Lineal & WBC Minimumweight titles.
Win 11–1–1 Japan Hidekazu Kakehashi KO 2 (10)
1:59
1989–02–08 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Loss 10–1–1 Thailand Napa Kiatwanchai MD 12 1988–11–13 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Lost Lineal & WBC Minimumweight titles.
Draw 10–0–1 Thailand Napa Kiatwanchai PTS 12 1988–06–05 Japan Kinki University Auditorium,
Osaka, Osaka
For Lineal & WBC Minimumweight titles.
Win 10–0 South Korea Kyung-Yun Lee TKO 12
1:36
1988–01–31 Japan Osaka-jō Hall, Osaka, Osaka For Lineal & WBC Minimumweight titles.
(Lee abandoned his IBF title to focus on winning the WBC title.)
Win 9–0 Thailand Mai Thomburifarm UD 12 1987–10–18 Japan Kinki University Auditorium,
Osaka, Osaka
Won WBC Minimumweight title.
Win 8–0 Japan Kenji Ono PTS 10 1987–07–08 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Won Japanese
Minimumweight title.
Win 7–0 Japan Akira Kiyono PTS 8 1987–04–28 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Osaka,
Osaka
Win 6–0 Japan Hisashi Nakatomi TKO 1 (6) 1987–02–22 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo
Win 5–0 Japan Dash Higashiho TKO 2 (4)
1:02
1986–10–07 Japan Sakuranomiya Skating Rink,
Osaka, Osaka
Win 4–0 Japan Masao Kasai PTS 4 1986–09–13 Japan City Sogo Gym, Matsumoto, Nagano
Win 3–0 Japan Osamu Uemoto KO 2 (4)
1:12
1986–03–05 Japan Nishinari Ward Center, Osaka, Osaka
Win 2–0 Japan Hiroshi Udo KO 2 (4)
1:44
1986–02–10 Japan Prefectural Gymnasium, Kōchi, Kōchi
Win 1–0 Japan Yukio Yorimochi KO 3 (4)
0:45
1986–01–23 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hiroki Ioka - Lineal Minimumweight Champion". The Cyber Boxing Zone Encyclopedia. 
  2. ^ "Hiroki Ioka Professional boxing record". BoxRec.com. 

External links[edit]

Achievements
Preceded by
new title created
WBC Minimumweight Champion
October 18, 1987 - November 13, 1988
Succeeded by
Napa Kiatwanchai
Preceded by
Kyung-Yun Lee
Lineal Minimumweight Champion
January 31, 1988 - November 13, 1988
Preceded by
Myung-Woo Yuh
WBA Light Flyweight Champion
December 17, 1991 - November 18, 1992
Succeeded by
Myung-Woo Yuh