Hiroki Moriya

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hiroki Moriya
Hiroki Moriya 13, 2015 Wimbledon Qualifying - Diliff.jpg
Country (sports)  Japan
Born (1990-10-16) 16 October 1990 (age 26)
Tokyo, Japan
Turned pro 2008
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $439,433
Singles
Career record 2–8
Career titles 0
1 Challengers, 5 Futures
Highest ranking No. 143 (5 January 2015)
Current ranking No. 166 (24 October 2016)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 1R (2015)
French Open Q2 (2012)
Wimbledon 1R (2015)
US Open 1R (2012)
Doubles
Career record 0–2
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 327 (4 November 2013)
Current ranking No. 1247 (6 June 2016)
Last updated on: 8 June 2016.

Hiroki Moriya (守屋 宏紀 Moriya Hiroki?, born 16 October 1990 in Tokyo) is a Japanese tennis player. He has won an ATP Challenger Tour singles title and achieved a career-high singles ranking of world No. 143 on 5 January 2015.[1]

Tennis career[edit]

Juniors[edit]

As a junior, Moriya compiled a singles win/loss record of 76-37, reaching as high as No. 17 in the junior combined world rankings in October 2008.[2]

Junior Grand Slam results:

Australian Open: 3R (2007, 2008)
French Open: Q1 (2007)
Wimbledon: 1R (2008)
US Open: Q2 (2006)

2008 - 11[edit]

Moriya had won three ITF Futures events in Japan and Chinese Taipei. He also had participated in a number of ATP Challenger Tour events, winning some matches of those tournaments. He ended 2011 as ranked world no. 327.

2012[edit]

Moriya failed to qualify for French Open and Wimbledon, but he qualified for the 2012 US Open to make his Grand Slam main draw debut, losing to Ivan Dodig in the first round.[3]

During the Asian hardcourt swing, he defeated Robin Haase in the Thailand Open to record his first ATP main draw win, and played a close match against Stanislas Wawrinka at the Japan Open, losing 5–7, 6–4, 4–6.[4] In November, Moriya reached his first ATP Challenger Tour final in Toyota, where he lost to Michał Przysiężny in straight sets.[5]

2013[edit]

He represented Japan for the first time in his career at the 2013 Davis Cup Asia/Oceania Zone Group I against South Korea. He played the doubles rubber with Yasutaka Uchiyama and Japan advanced into the World Group Play-offs.

Moriya was the runner-up of Shanghai Challenger, losing to his countryman Yuichi Sugita in the final, and he made quarterfinals or better of Asian Challenger events in this year.

2014[edit]

In Australian hard court season, Moriya reached the final in the Burnie Challenger for the third time at this level and the semifinal in West Lakes.

Moriya won his first challenger title, winning the $50,000+H Granby Challenger event in Canada by beating Fabrice Martin in the final.[6] Following this tournament, he entered the ATP rankings top 150. In Asian swing, Moriya competed in the ATP events of Kuala Lumpur and Tokyo, both losing in the first round.

2015[edit]

In the 2015 Australian Open, despite losing of the qualifying round, Moriya was into main draw as lucky loser instead of Juan Martín del Potro.[7] He was eliminated in the first round by Jerzy Janowicz with four sets. He won through the qualifying at the 2015 Wimbledon Championships, dropping just one set, but lost to ninth seed and reigning US Open champion Marin Čilić in the opening round.[8] In September, Moriya reached second round of the Shenzhen Open, beating Ričardas Berankis in straight sets. He lost to third seed Tommy Robredo.

ATP Challenger finals[edit]

Singles: 6 (2 titles, 4 runner-ups)[edit]

Legend
ATP Challenger Tour (2–4)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1. 25 November 2012 Toyota, Japan Carpet (i) Poland Michał Przysiężny 2–6, 3–6
Runner-up 2. 8 September 2013 Shanghai, China Hard Japan Yuichi Sugita 3–6, 3–6
Runner-up 3. 1 February 2014 Burnie, Australia Hard Australia Matt Reid 3–6, 2–6
Winner 1. 20 July 2014 Granby, Canada Hard France Fabrice Martin 7–5, 6–7(4–7), 6–3
Winner 2. 17 September 2016 Nanchang, China Hard South Korea Chung Hyeon 4–6, 6–1, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 23 October 2016 Ningbo, China Hard Chinese Taipei Lu Yen-hsun 3–6, 1–6

References[edit]

External links[edit]